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Best Places to See NYC's Bridges 

The bridges of New York City stand as landmarks for the city's parks and waterfronts, creating a unique way to experience NYC's great outdoors. Whether running, relaxing, or getting a great photo for your Instagram account, we know where to find the most stunning views of these majestic works of engineering. Here are some highlights:

The Hell Gate

Some say this bridge most resembles Australia's Sydney Harbour Bridge. In fact, the Hell Gate Bridge was the inspiration for the design of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, which opened 15 years after the Hell Gate Bridge first opened in 1917. When it opened, the Hell Gate Bridge was the world’s longest steel arch bridge at 1,017 feet. It stretches across the "Hellegat",  a channel so named by Dutch sailors for the treacherous currents at this turn in the East River. Where to see it from a park:

Ralph Demarco Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Ralph Demarco Park

Astoria Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Astoria Park

Randall’s Island Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Randall's Island Park

Floating Pool at Barretto Point Park, Bronx


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about the Floating Pool

Bayonne Bridge

When it opened in 1931, the Bayonne Bridge surpassed the Hell Gate to become the longest steel arch bridge in the world and remained so for 45 years. The same scissors that was used to cut the ribbon on the Bayonne Bridge was used to cut the ribbon on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, referred to as its "sister bridge". The Bayonne Bridge connects Staten Island with Bayonne, New Jersey. Where to see it from a park:

Faber Park, Staten Island


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Faber Park

Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (formerly the Triborough Bridge)

The Robert F. Kennedy Bridge opened in 1936 and comprises three bridges, a viaduct, and 14 miles of approach roads that connect Manhattan, Queens, and the Bronx. Perhaps the most recognizable of the three bridges is the Queens crossing suspension bridge that towers over Astoria Park. The bridge opened a few days after the City first opened Astoria Pool, New York City's oldest and largest swimming pool. It has been said that Robert Moses intended Astoria Pool to be the grandest of the new pools because it had the best view of the bridge. Where to see the bridge from a park:

Astoria Pool in Astoria Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Astoria Park

Randall’s Island Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Randall's Island Park

Carl Schurz Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Carl Schurz Park

Brooklyn Bridge

Since it first opened—right before Memorial Day Weekend in 1883—the Brooklyn Bridge has remained, to this day, the most iconic of New York’s 1,145 bridges. At the time it was built, it was the longest suspension bridge in the world with a main span of 1,595 feet. It reaches across the East River and connects Manhattan’s southern end to Brooklyn’s west side. Where to see Brooklyn Bridge from a park:

Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Brooklyn Bridge Park

Williamsburg Bridge

When it opened in 1903, the Williamsburg Bridge won Brooklyn Bridge's title for the longest suspension bridge in the world with a span of 1,600 feet—surpassing the Brooklyn Bridge's span by only five feet. The bridge links Manhattan and Brooklyn and carries the J, M, and Z subway lines. There are pedestrian walkways and bikeways as well as lanes for motorists. Where to see it from a park: 

East River Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about East River Park

WNYC Transmitter Park, Brooklyn


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Transmitter Park

Manhattan Bridge

The Manhattan Bridge towers the East River in between the Brooklyn and Williamsburg bridges. The bridge carries motorists and the N, Q, B, and D subway lines, as well as pedestrian and bicycle lanes. The bridge, which opened on New Year's Eve in 1909, was designed by the same person (Leon Moisseiff) who assisted in designing the George Washington and Robert F. Kennedy Bridges. Where to see it from a park: 

Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Brooklyn Bridge Park

George Washington Bridge

This giant bridge in northern Manhattan has a 3,500-foot center span and its towers are 570 feet tall. The George Washington Bridge connects Fort Washington Park in Manhattan to New Jersey’s Fort Lee Historic Park and the Palisades. Just under the bridge on the Manhattan side is the Little Red Lighthouse, Manhattan island’s only lighthouse. The bridge first opened in 1931.

Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Fort Tryon Park

Fort Washington Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Fort Washington Park

Other great parks: Riverside Park and Riverside Park South.

Wards Island Bridge

This pedestrian bridge connects East 103rd street in Manhattan to Wards Island. The original bridge was built in 1807 but a storm in 1821 damaged most of it, so a new one was built in 1951. Where to see it from a park:

Randall's Island Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Randalls Island Park

High Bridge

The High Bridge, NYC’s oldest standing bridge—which connects Manhattan to the Bronx at the Harlem River—reopened in 2015 after closing for more than 40 years for rehabilitation. The bridge was built in the mid-19th century as part of the Croton Aqueduct system, which carried water from the Croton River in Westchester down to Manhattan. The High Bridge is open to pedestrians and cyclists only. Where to see it in a park:

Highbridge Parks, Manhattan & Bronx


Photo by Malcolm Pinckney/NYC Parks. More information about the High Bridge

Harlem River Bridges at Bridge Park, Bronx

Here at Bridge Park's greenway, you’ll be able to see a trio of some the Harlem River's bridges—the High Bridge, the Alexander Hamilton Bridge, and the Washington Bridge.


Photo by Malcolm Pinckney/NYC Parks. More information about Bridge Park

The Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge

NYC’s tallest bridge (its towers are 693 feet tall)  helped transform southern Brooklyn and Staten Island's beaches and parks into new destinations. Before it opened in November, 1964, ferries were the only means of travel between Staten Island and its Manhattan and Brooklyn neighbors. On its opening day, about 10,000 cars crossed the 4,260 foot-span bridge, the world's longest suspension span at that time. The bridge helped bring more businesses, new neighbors, and frequent visitors to Brooklyn’s south shore waterfront, Coney Island Beach and Boardwalk, Staten Island’s beach end, and the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Today, you can see a sign at Fourth Avenue and Shore Road that points to Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Where to see the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge from a park:

Shore Road Park and Parkway, Brooklyn


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Shore Road Parkway

Staten Island's East Shore Beaches: South Beach and Midland Beach


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about South Beach and Midland Beach

Kaiser Park, Brooklyn


Photo by Malcolm Pinckney/NYC Parks. More information about Kaiser Park

Because of the bridge’s tremendous height, you can see it from almost any point near Brooklyn’s southern end and Staten Island’s east end. Other great park views of the Verrazzano Narrows Bridge include Von Briesen Park, John Paul Jones Park, and Alice Austen Park.

The Bronx-Whitestone Bridge

The Whitestone Bridge looks very similar to the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge but it is about half the height and span. It opened on April 29, 1939—one day before the opening day of 1939-1940 World’s Fair—just in time to bring New Yorkers from the Bronx and upstate New York to the fair at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The bridge boasts a serene view, connecting Ferry Point Park on the Bronx side to Francis Lewis Park on the Queens side. Where to see it from a park:

Ferry Point Park, Bronx


Photo by Malcolm Pinckney/NYC Parks. More information about Ferry Point Park

Francis Lewis Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Francis Lewis Park

The Throgs Neck Bridge

The Throgs Neck Bridge opened in 1961, 22 years after the Whitestone Bridge opened. It is located about two miles east of the Whitestone Bridge and connects the Bronx’s Throggs Neck area to Bayside, Queens. Where to see it from a park: 

Fort Totten Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Fort Totten Park

Little Bay Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Little Bay Park

Henry Hudson Bridge

The bridge is named for the famed explorer Henry Hudson, who anchored here near the site of the bridge in 1609. The Henry Hudson Bridge connects Manhattan and the Bronx and is best admired from Inwood Hill Park.

Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan


Photo by Malcolm Pinckney/NYC Parks. More information about Inwood Hill Park

Muscota Marsh at Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Muscota Marsh

Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge

The bridge, named for one of New York City’s former mayors, first opened to traffic a few days before summer in 1909. It is 7,449 feet long and spans the East River at 3,725 feet. The bridge crosses over Roosevelt Island and connects Manhattan to Queensbridge, Queens. The Roosevelt Island Tramway runs alongside the bridge. Where to see it from a park:

Queensbridge Park, Queens


Photo by Daniel Avila/NYC Parks. More information about Queensbridge Park

Carl Schurz Park, Manhattan


More information about Carl Schurz Park

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