Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

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2022

Manhattan

Image courtesy of the artist.

Glori Tuitt, Black, Trans, and Alive (Return Home), 2021
October 30, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Playground One Twenty Five CXXV, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?Inspired by Harlem Renaissance muralist Aaron Douglas, “Black, Trans & Alive” is a project honoring the lives and contributions of Black trans femme leaders and lovers centering care and humanity. This piece features (from left to right) Marsha P. Johnson, Miss Major, Tourmaline, Nala Simone Toussaint, Courtney Washington and Gia Love.

Black, Trans, and Alive (Return Home) is made possible in part with funding from ArtBridge, and Facebook Open Arts.

Image credit: Connie Lee

Zaq Landsberg, Reclining Liberty
May 7, 2021 to April 25, 2022
Morningside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Reclining Liberty is a mashup of the Statue of Liberty and the giant reclining Buddha statues of Asia. The piece, coated in plaster resin, is sturdy enough to allow viewers to touch, climb, sit atop, lean up against the figure, and interact with the monument at a human level. Finished with copper paint and an oxidizing acid, the patina mimics the actual Statue of Liberty. 

Reclining Liberty is made possible in part with funding from: Friends of Morningside Park, LMCC, Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, New York State Council on the Arts, and Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation (UMEZ).

Image Courtesy of the artist.

Hilary Duffy, At the Hydrant
February 17, 2022 to April 17, 2022
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
At The Hydrant is a photography essay about a block in Harlem next to Marcus Garvey Park during the Covid-19 pandemic. It represents community spirit and improvisation. In cramped urban living spaces, we faced new challenges from working at home to juggling online school and safe activities for our children. We were isolated and mentally struggled with how to cope. This block converts the street into a public space as part of the Open Streets program in New York City. Three female community leaders develop programing for masked-up residents to safely use the street. When most public pools and summer camps were closed, neighbors come together for play, cooling off, live music, outdoor movies, yoga, spiritual services, drum circles and theme nights while buffered by parked cars. A little oasis thrives while food insecurity, rebellion, homelessness and addiction trouble our New York neighborhoods during tough economic times. Besides play and socializing, a humanitarian component also strengthens the block. Neighbors volunteer to bag and stock the community public fridge on the block and coordinated homeless outreach.

Image credit: Raul de Nieves, And the night mare rides on, image courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, The Musical Brain
April 30, 2021 to March 30, 2022
Multiple Locations
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
The Musical Brain is a group exhibition that reflects on the power music has to bring us together. The exhibition is named after a short story by the Argentine contemporary writer CÃ?©sar Aira, and explores the ways that artists use music as a tool to inhabit and understand the world. The featured artists approach music through different lenses—historical, political, performative, and playful—to create new installations and soundscapes installed throughout the park. This exhibition includes works by Rebecca Belmore and Osvaldo Yero, Vivian Caccuri, Raul de Nieves, Guillermo Galindo, David Horvitz, Mai-Thu Perret, Naama Tsabar, and Antonio Vega Macotela. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Ibrahim Mahama, 57 Forms of Liberty
April 30, 2021 to March 30, 2022
16th Street The High Line
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For the High Line, Ibrahim Mahama presents 57 Forms of Liberty, an inverted industrial tank from a defunct manufacturing facility in Wilmington, North Carolina. The work is inspired by a rusted smokestack the artist saw at the locomotive workshop in Sekondi, Ghana that now has a tree growing from its mouth. For Mahama, the workshop is an important reference to the British use of railways to divide and exploit resources until the country regained its independence in 1959. While the British railways, a former industrial tank from North Carolina, and the High Line have very different industrial histories, Mahama notes that it’s often when we zoom out, and remove ourselves from a specific space and time, that we can come to see our shared history all the better. The sculpture on the High Line also has a tree growing from its top, an important image for the artist that mirrors the torch of the Statue of Liberty to the south, and the non-human agents that continue to reinvent the conditions for living on this planet, even among the structures built and abandoned by humans. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Hannah Levy, Retainer
April 30, 2022 to March 30, 2022
23rd Street
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For the High Line, Hannah Levy makes an oversized orthodontic retainer from carved marble and stainless steel. The piece points to the strangeness of orthodontics and straight teeth as a marker of class, in part because of orthodontics’ exorbitant price. The organic form of the cast mouth contrasts with its smooth metal bars, which conjures the feeling of the rigid form inside one’s mouth and invites external structures inside one’s own body. Levy’s giant retainer is almost as tall as the park benches nearby, and the retainer wire is the size of the High Line’s exterior railings, which sets the piece in conversation with the architecture and design of the park and its surroundings. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo courtesy of worthless studios

Behin-Ha Design Studio, Be Heard
May 15, 2021 to March 18, 2022
Thomas Paine Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Be Heard is a large-scale megaphone made of plywood panels arranged to create the conical form of the megaphone and assembled to create the structural framework that holds it up. The plywood was previously used as a barrier, providing security to businesses from the perceived threat of the protests on one side, and a canvas for expression to street artists and protesters on the other. By transforming the plywood to a megaphone, a device for amplifying people's voices, the project builds on these layers of use and meaning. It aims to elicit a hopeful and optimistic reaction, highlighting the resilience of New York City by showcasing how a material once used as a barrier during protests can be transformed to celebrate free speech and civic engagement.

The Plywood Protection Project is an initiative to collect the plywood used by NYC businesses to board up their windows during the protests of 2020 and redistribute it to artists, extending and repurposing the life of this material. Arts not-for-profit worthless studios collected over 200 boards of plywood and initiated an open call for artists, eventually selecting five local makers to participate in a unifying public art project across all five boroughs of New York. This piece is one of the five created by the project, each installed in a different borough of New York City.

This exhibition is presented by worthless studios.

Habitat Workshop, Bloom
February 9, 2022 to March 9, 2022
Father Duffy Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?Designed by architecture and urban design practice Habitat Workshop, Bloom is the winner of the 14th Annual Times Square Love and Design Competition. From afar, Bloom resembles a pavilion — a circular roof supported by a series of interlocked pink and white PVC pipes. From above, it blooms from the center with an arrangement of pixelated hearts. And from below, it becomes a buoyant cloudscape where the pipes overhead, descending to different heights, become vaulted portals allowing light to peek through from all directions. The structure channels the brightness of Times Square and showers down rays of light that greet visitors once they enter the structure, serving as a reminder of the fleeting moments of happiness and joy that persevere even in the shroud of darkness.

The 14th Annual Times Square Love and Design Competition is presented by Times Square Arts in partnership with The Museum of Arts and Design.

Queens

Photo: courtesy of RPGA Studio

Yvonne Shortt, Joel Esquite, & Community, Hair Salon
June 21, 2022 to June 17, 2023
Captain Tilly Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This public artwork celebrates hair as a form of cultural identity, beauty, and beliefs. In this initiative RPGA Studio worked with community members to capture the diversity in our community and engaged students at Queens College about hair, cultural identity, and community empowerment. Through these conversations RPGA Studio designed 21 hairstyle illustrations to go along the fence of Captain Tilly Park. Hairstyles include community member with gray hair, no hair, afros, braids, ponytails, 3c and 4c hair curl patterns, Indian traditional styles, male top buns, and more.

Photo: courtesy of RPGA Studio

Yvonne Shortt, Mayuko Fujino, Joel Esquite, & Community, Leaf Boats and Reflections
June 21, 2022 to June 17, 2023
MacDonald Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This public art piece is in remembrance of those we have lost to COVID-related deaths. Working with the community, RPGA Studio collected stories that inspired the ceramic relief tiles attached on the concrete border of the reflection pond. The pond is a mirrored acrylic pane that reflects the sky above and the individual looking down at the pond. Leaf boats serve as a space for community members to put flowers, silent notes to reach loved ones.

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