Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

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2022

Manhattan

Image Courtesy of the artist.

Hilary Duffy, At the Hydrant
February 17, 2022 to April 17, 2022
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
At The Hydrant is a photography essay about a block in Harlem next to Marcus Garvey Park during the Covid-19 pandemic. It represents community spirit and improvisation. In cramped urban living spaces, we faced new challenges from working at home to juggling online school and safe activities for our children. We were isolated and mentally struggled with how to cope. This block converts the street into a public space as part of the Open Streets program in New York City. Three female community leaders develop programing for masked-up residents to safely use the street. When most public pools and summer camps were closed, neighbors come together for play, cooling off, live music, outdoor movies, yoga, spiritual services, drum circles and theme nights while buffered by parked cars. A little oasis thrives while food insecurity, rebellion, homelessness and addiction trouble our New York neighborhoods during tough economic times. Besides play and socializing, a humanitarian component also strengthens the block. Neighbors volunteer to bag and stock the community public fridge on the block and coordinated homeless outreach.

Image credit: Raul de Nieves, And the night mare rides on, image courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, The Musical Brain
April 30, 2021 to March 30, 2022
Multiple Locations
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
The Musical Brain is a group exhibition that reflects on the power music has to bring us together. The exhibition is named after a short story by the Argentine contemporary writer CÃ?©sar Aira, and explores the ways that artists use music as a tool to inhabit and understand the world. The featured artists approach music through different lenses—historical, political, performative, and playful—to create new installations and soundscapes installed throughout the park. This exhibition includes works by Rebecca Belmore and Osvaldo Yero, Vivian Caccuri, Raul de Nieves, Guillermo Galindo, David Horvitz, Mai-Thu Perret, Naama Tsabar, and Antonio Vega Macotela. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Ibrahim Mahama, 57 Forms of Liberty
April 30, 2021 to March 30, 2022
16th Street The High Line
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For the High Line, Ibrahim Mahama presents 57 Forms of Liberty, an inverted industrial tank from a defunct manufacturing facility in Wilmington, North Carolina. The work is inspired by a rusted smokestack the artist saw at the locomotive workshop in Sekondi, Ghana that now has a tree growing from its mouth. For Mahama, the workshop is an important reference to the British use of railways to divide and exploit resources until the country regained its independence in 1959. While the British railways, a former industrial tank from North Carolina, and the High Line have very different industrial histories, Mahama notes that it’s often when we zoom out, and remove ourselves from a specific space and time, that we can come to see our shared history all the better. The sculpture on the High Line also has a tree growing from its top, an important image for the artist that mirrors the torch of the Statue of Liberty to the south, and the non-human agents that continue to reinvent the conditions for living on this planet, even among the structures built and abandoned by humans. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Hannah Levy, Retainer
April 30, 2022 to March 30, 2022
23rd Street
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For the High Line, Hannah Levy makes an oversized orthodontic retainer from carved marble and stainless steel. The piece points to the strangeness of orthodontics and straight teeth as a marker of class, in part because of orthodontics’ exorbitant price. The organic form of the cast mouth contrasts with its smooth metal bars, which conjures the feeling of the rigid form inside one’s mouth and invites external structures inside one’s own body. Levy’s giant retainer is almost as tall as the park benches nearby, and the retainer wire is the size of the High Line’s exterior railings, which sets the piece in conversation with the architecture and design of the park and its surroundings. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo courtesy of worthless studios

Behin-Ha Design Studio, Be Heard
May 15, 2021 to March 18, 2022
Thomas Paine Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Be Heard is a large-scale megaphone made of plywood panels arranged to create the conical form of the megaphone and assembled to create the structural framework that holds it up. The plywood was previously used as a barrier, providing security to businesses from the perceived threat of the protests on one side, and a canvas for expression to street artists and protesters on the other. By transforming the plywood to a megaphone, a device for amplifying people's voices, the project builds on these layers of use and meaning. It aims to elicit a hopeful and optimistic reaction, highlighting the resilience of New York City by showcasing how a material once used as a barrier during protests can be transformed to celebrate free speech and civic engagement.

The Plywood Protection Project is an initiative to collect the plywood used by NYC businesses to board up their windows during the protests of 2020 and redistribute it to artists, extending and repurposing the life of this material. Arts not-for-profit worthless studios collected over 200 boards of plywood and initiated an open call for artists, eventually selecting five local makers to participate in a unifying public art project across all five boroughs of New York. This piece is one of the five created by the project, each installed in a different borough of New York City.

This exhibition is presented by worthless studios.

Habitat Workshop, Bloom
February 9, 2022 to March 9, 2022
Father Duffy Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?Designed by architecture and urban design practice Habitat Workshop, Bloom is the winner of the 14th Annual Times Square Love and Design Competition. From afar, Bloom resembles a pavilion — a circular roof supported by a series of interlocked pink and white PVC pipes. From above, it blooms from the center with an arrangement of pixelated hearts. And from below, it becomes a buoyant cloudscape where the pipes overhead, descending to different heights, become vaulted portals allowing light to peek through from all directions. The structure channels the brightness of Times Square and showers down rays of light that greet visitors once they enter the structure, serving as a reminder of the fleeting moments of happiness and joy that persevere even in the shroud of darkness.

The 14th Annual Times Square Love and Design Competition is presented by Times Square Arts in partnership with The Museum of Arts and Design.

Queens

Sherwin Banfield, Going Back to The Meadows, A Tribute to LL Cool J and Performance at FMCP
November 30, 2021 to November 23, 2022
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Going Back to The Meadows is a sculptural sonic performance artwork dedicated to Queens hip-hop legend LL Cool J, his hometown of Queens, NY, and historical performances at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The sculpture includes a traditionally sculpted portrait bust of LL Cool J sitting atop a mirror polished stainless steel radio design and steel pedestal frame. The pedestal design includes references to LL’s unique style and career accolades and Queens landmarks. The sculpture’s audio speakers are solar powered, highlighting the use of green technology.

This exhibition is made possible by the Art in the Parks: Alliance for Flushing Meadows Corona Park Grant, which supports the creation of site-specific public artworks by Queens-based artists for two sites within Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Haksul Lee, The Giving Tree
November 30, 2021 to November 23, 2022
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Giving Tree brings awareness to the environmental concerns in the Queens community and elevates Flushing Meadows Corona Park as one that leads the future. This artificial tree will use wind power to generate electricity to light the park and provide a charging station for park visitors. It serves as a form of altruism to promote a higher level of collective consciousness and cooperation, which are necessary to ensure our collective well-being and even survival.

This exhibition is made possible by the Art in the Parks: Alliance for Flushing Meadows Corona Park Grant, which supports the creation of site-specific public artworks by Queens-based artists for two sites within Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Photo Credit: Savannah Lauren

Hive Public Space and The Urban Conga, The Ribbon
October 1, 2021 to September 30, 2022
Rafferty Triangle, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This piece is a playful interactive platform that invites you to connect with LIC admirers, contribute a message, and engage with the surrounding space in new ways. It is part of a multisite installation throughout Court Square where kinetic units reveal “love notes” submitted by residents, workers, and visitors.

Image caption: Image courtesy BODYARMOR

MAST, Tennis Is a Game
August 26, 2021 to August 25, 2022
Detective Keith L Williams Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

In 2021, BODYARMOR Sports Drink and Naomi Osaka kicked off a court renovation initiative designed to revitalize tennis courts she grew up playing on, enriching the community, inspiring youth sports organizations through art, and ultimately reminding everyone to play to have fun, because after all, tennis is a game.

This exhibition is presented by BODYARMOR.

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