Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

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2022

Manhattan

Image: courtesy of the artist

Capucine Bourcart, Plastic Fantastic!
June 9, 2021 to June 26, 2022
Harlem Art Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
With Plastic Fantastic the artist takes a new approach to her public artworks working with new materials, shapes and proportions to create a site-specific work. The installation illustrates the abundance and overuse of plastic bags and packaging in our daily lives.

The scale of the installation will illustrate the abundance of single use plastics and their impact on our public spaces and on our environment. Viewers entering the park and facing the photographic assemblage will see the installation in its entirety, a colorful intervention in the space but once they get closer, they will recognize the common subject matter.

The goal of this project is to support the ban of plastic bags in New York City and to encourage residents to take responsibility for their own environmental footprint. 

Plastic Fantastic! is made possible in part with funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Friends of Art Park Alliance, and individual donors.

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

MIDABI, The Only Other
June 24, 2021 to June 23, 2022
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Created by the artist MIDABI, this steel sculptural text piece stands at 10 feet tall and 20 feet long, covered in a silver acrylic paint. His original literary works of esoteric origin are formed into visual art and produced for public display as a means of sharing information. Although agitation is a primary effect, and the approach can be cryptic, the work has an empathic core value that reaches a wide array of individuals.

Zaq Landsberg, Tomb Effigy of Margaret Corbin
June 18, 2021 to June 11, 2022
Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Tomb Effigy of Margaret Corbin pays tribute to Revolutionary War hero Margaret Corbin (1751–1800), considered the first woman to fight for America, and namesake of several Fort Tryon Park features. Corbin took control of her fallen husband’s cannon and fought during the Battle of Fort Washington at this site in 1776. The artwork takes the form of the tomb effigies at The Met Cloisters, figuratively and aesthetically stitching together the Revolutionary War battlefield and the ahistorical, relocated medieval French abbeys that comprise the Cloisters. In addition to paying homage to a lesser-known female historical figure, Landsberg’s sculpture contributes to the contemporary conversation around representation in monuments and public commemoration.

This exhibition was made possible by the Clare Weiss Emerging Artist Award. This award was made possible with support from Janet and John Koehne.

Image caption: Image courtesy Kasmin. Photography by Diego Flores

George Rickey, George Rickey Sculpture
August 30, 2021 to May 9, 2022
E. 52nd Street
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

This exhibition features nine of George Rickey’s classic, large-scale kinetic sculptures, some of them not exhibited in many years. These works will showcase much of Rickey’s diverse and energetic repertoire, with the oldest first made in 1964, and the latest officially completed in 2002. On verdant Park Avenue, the show will fully realize Rickey’s theses about the bridge between the built and natural worlds. 

This exhibition is presented by Kasmin, the George Rickey Foundation, and the Fund for Park Avenue.

Image credit: Photo by Yasunori Matsui, Courtesy of Madison Square Park Conservancy

Hugh Hayden, Brier Patch
January 18, 2022 to May 1, 2022
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Presented across four separate lawns in the park, Brier Patch features a total of one-hundred wooden elementary school-style desks that erupt with tree branches, cohering into tangled assemblies with complex and layered meanings. The accumulations of desks summon the grid arrangement of classroom seating. Referencing folklore traditions around the world, the work calls on the notion of the brier patch as a place protective for some and dangerous for others, drawing connections to similar disparities within the education system and the ideal of the American Dream.

This exhibition is presented by Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Image credit: Courtesy of Taglialatella Galleries

Rubem Robierb, Dream Machine II
May 4, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Description: Dream Machine II is a tribute to the human spirit. However fragile we are in our own circumstances, despite these challenges, we remain strong, resilient, and even defiant. As a monument, the wings take flight to carry the hopes of an increasingly challenged generation that dreams of a fair and just society.

This exhibition is presented by Taglialatella Galleries and Randall’s Island Park Alliance.

Image credit: Courtesy of Taglialatella Galleries

Rubem Robierb, The Peace Makers
May 4, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Inspired by recent and ongoing events and protests for racial justice, the Peace Makers is a 10-foot sculpture that serves as a tribute to peace makers around the world, who tirelessly fight for peace and justice. The sculpture is a dynamic form that represents the spirit of different cultures and races while recognizing the potential for unity in the name of progression and peace.

This exhibition is presented by Taglialatella Galleries and Randall’s Island Park Alliance.

Image credit: Image courtesy of the artist

J Maya Luz, Good Neighbors
October 22, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Anibal Aviles Playground, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Begun in 2010, Good Neighbors became a way to celebrate and preserve the history of a place by photographing its residents and business owners. This year, in the midst of a pandemic, a project that began in admiration of a neighborhood and its inhabitants has new significance. With support from the Columbus-Amsterdam BID, El Taller Latino Americano, and City Artists Corps, this project has expanded to bring a larger sense of optimism to our minds as we face this moment, unclear of when it will end and what our return will look like.

Image courtesy of the artist.

Glori Tuitt, Black, Trans, and Alive (Return Home), 2021
October 30, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Playground One Twenty Five CXXV, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?Inspired by Harlem Renaissance muralist Aaron Douglas, “Black, Trans & Alive” is a project honoring the lives and contributions of Black trans femme leaders and lovers centering care and humanity. This piece features (from left to right) Marsha P. Johnson, Miss Major, Tourmaline, Nala Simone Toussaint, Courtney Washington and Gia Love.

Black, Trans, and Alive (Return Home) is made possible in part with funding from ArtBridge, and Facebook Open Arts.

Image credit: Connie Lee

Zaq Landsberg, Reclining Liberty
May 7, 2021 to April 25, 2022
Morningside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Reclining Liberty is a mashup of the Statue of Liberty and the giant reclining Buddha statues of Asia. The piece, coated in plaster resin, is sturdy enough to allow viewers to touch, climb, sit atop, lean up against the figure, and interact with the monument at a human level. Finished with copper paint and an oxidizing acid, the patina mimics the actual Statue of Liberty. 

Reclining Liberty is made possible in part with funding from: Friends of Morningside Park, LMCC, Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, New York State Council on the Arts, and Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation (UMEZ).

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