Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

Public Art Map and Guide

Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

View the map

Search Current and Past Exhibits

  to  

2019

Queens

Image credit: Courtesy of Lewis H. Latimer House Museum

Shervone Neckles, Beacon Sails
June 22, 2019 to October 20, 2019
Lewis H Latimer House, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

The landmark status of Lewis H. Latimer House and Museum serves as inspiration for the Beacon Sails. The artwork affirms the Museum’s sense of place and belonging within the Flushing and greater Queens community and honors the groundbreaking lifework of humanitarian, Lewis H. Latimer. The outdoor installation features two triangular-shaped shade sails which function as a focal point to attract the local public and serve as a locator for visitors. The patterned designs featured on each canopy draw inspiration from Latimer’s mechanical drawings and patents, specifically the 1882 patent for processing carbon filament. Also embedded into the designs are scientific symbols for light and energy. The patterned designs pay tribute to Lewis H. Latimer’s vision for bridging art and science to improve the conditions of society and our overall quality of life.

This exhibition is presented by the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum, made possible in part by public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Creative Art Works, Baby Park 2050
September 15, 2018 to September 14, 2019
Queensbridge "Baby" Park (12th Street and 41st Road), Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?This mural is part of the Long Island City Partnership’s “Community Arts Connection,” an arts-based strategy to better connect all areas of Long Island City to enhance cultural vitality.  Youth residents of Queensbridge Houses and the Jacob Riis Neighborhood Settlement created this community art mural, which was inspired by responses to a survey of Queensbridge residents. The mural installation was led by artist Michael Mitchell and Creative Art Works, an organization that empowers young people through arts programming.

The mural is presented by the Long Island City Partnership, Jacob Riis Neighborhood Settlement at Queensbridge Houses, and Creative Art Works. 

Image credit: Miya Ando, Ginga (Silver River), photo by Scott Lynch, courtesy of Socrates Sculpture Park

Various Artists, Chronos Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space
May 5, 2019 to September 3, 2019
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
Chronos Cosmos: Deep Time, Open Space transforms Socrates Sculpture Park into a gateway to the universe, presenting artworks that consider space, time, and matter in relationship to celestial entities and earth-bound processes. In the open-air environment of the Long Island City waterfront park, the exhibition uses scale to put the universe in context, creating connection points to space and time. Participating artists include Radcliffe Bailey, Beatriz Cortez, Alicja Kwade, Eduardo Navarro, Heidi Neilson, and Oscar Santillán with new commissions by Miya Ando, William Lamson, and (MDR) Maria D. Rapicavoli. Each artist’s own notions of time, history, space, and site challenge the reigning system regulated by technocratic and colonial standards. Together the works reveal a coexistence of disjointed times in our contemporary world: clocked and measured time, rhythmic biological time, earthly time, the flowing time of human experience, anticipatory time, historical and anachronistic time, serial and simultaneous time, as well as technologically mediated time.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park .

Matt Keegan, what was & what is, 2019, installation view, Commissioned by SculptureCenter, New York. Courtesy the artist and Altman Siegel, San Francisco. Photo: Kyle Knodell

Matt Keegan, what was & what is
May 12, 2019 to August 18, 2019
Court Square Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

what was & what is speaks the language of urban development while prompting opportunity for reflection on the fastest-growing neighborhood in New York City. what was & what is is an 8-foot-tall rectangular perimeter, a nearly empty room of about 180 square feet. The site positions the work at the feet of brand new residential buildings. Like its neighbors, Keegan’s work is constructed mostly in transparent panes, a model home approaching 1:1 scale. Its interior floor shows an enlarged dollhouse view of an empty one-bedroom rental apartment in the Hayden, a building across Jackson Avenue.

On three sides, the phrase “For a long time this neighborhood was about what will be, and now I think it’s about what is.” traces the upper edges of the sculpture. The quotation is pulled from a developer’s comment in a 2017 New York Times article titled “Long Island City Grows Ever Skyward.” Expressing the apotheosis of longtime speculative interest in Long Island City, it takes stock of the present with a puzzling formulation of self-reflection. If Long Island City is now “about what is,” then what is it about? Has “what will be” turned out to be “what is”? What was the present like when it was ostensibly about the future? The phrase begs the question of whose timeline and whose sense of anticipation guides narratives of a neighborhood’s arrival. To this end, the sculpture’s back wall is made of mirrored glass, a surface capturing a constant stream of traffic and passersby inside.

This exhibition is presented by SculptureCenter.

RPGA Studio, Peppermint in Pieces, Park Delight, and The Park Fence Project
August 10, 2018 to August 9, 2019
Captain Tilly Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

RPGA Studio, Inc. uses art as a tool to promote healthy lifestyles and engage the surrounding community of Captain Tilly Park. RPGA worked with parkgoers, including students from Ideal Montessori School and MS 358, to design this multi-component, parkwide exhibition. In addition flowers and umbrellas along the park’s entryway on Highland Avenue, visitors will find creative signage that encourages positive park usage and maintenance, as well as local flora and fauna. When surveyed what would encourage more people to visit the park, children frequently requested a dog—RPGA happily obliged placing a sculpture of Peppermint the pup on the park’s south end to greet people. The work is in 12 pieces and takes the viewer a little while to locate the perfect spot to view the piece. It draws additional inspiration from an eye condition called Retinitis Pigmentosa that artist Yvonne Shortt suffers from.

Art in the Parks: Active Open Space is a partnership between the NYC Parks and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in collaboration with the Fund for Public Health in NYC and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to activate park space with health-inspired art installations that promote physical activity and strengthen community connections. Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Image: Karl Orozco, Hospicio Caba�±as (Playable Stage for Thunder Hawk) with Tonalxochitl Danza Mexica at the opening event, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Karl Orozco, Hospicio Cabañas (Playable Stage for Thunder Hawk)
June 30, 2019 to July 15, 2019
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Hospicio Cabañas (Playable Stage for Thunder Hawk) by Karl Orozco is an interpretation of the oldest hospital complex and orphanage in the Americas located in Guadalajara, Mexico. Hospicio Cabans was a playable stage in the arcade hit Super Street Fighter II and served as home court for Thunder Hawk, the first Mexican video game character. Using colorful dried corn kernels, Orozco will create a pixelated mosaic of Thunder Hawk’s stage on a large column at the entrance on 111th Street. He will inject the character’s backstory with greater historical and cultural relevance that is lost in the video game’s culturally insensitive depiction. Instead, Orozco will draw inspiration from Danza de la Pluma (a traditional dance originating in Oaxaca, Mexico that reinterprets the Spanish conquest of the Zapotec people) and today’s elote vendors along the park. 

This exhibition is made possible by the Art in the Parks: Alliance for Flushing Meadows Corona Park Grant, which supports the creation of site-specific public artworks by Queens-based artists for two sites within Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Image: Rose DeSiano, Absent Monuments, Courtesy of the Artist.

Rose DeSiano, Absent Monuments
July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019
Rufus King Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
Absent Monuments consists of several mirrored obelisks. The viewer’s mirrored reflection both celebrates them and subtly brings them into Jamaica, Queens’ complex history of colonization, war, abolitionism, immigration and rural urbanization. The obelisks’ stone plinths feature blue and white Dutch Delft photographic tiles that display the history of Rufus King Park and are surrounded by floral tiles inspired by Native American pattern work. Through these motifs, the obelisks honor the complex history of the Native American people, while also acknowledging the various periods of cultural displacements that have occurred in Queens.

Image caption: Courtesy of Yvonne Shortt

Yvonne Shortt, Joel Esquite & Mayuko Fujino, with the Jackson Heights Community, What We Carry
October 25, 2019 to June 30, 2019
Dunningham Triangle, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
What We Carry celebrates immigrants through a two-part installation. The first element, an aluminum sculpture of a silhouetted woman, is adorned with cut-out designs illustrating the journey of those who come by plane, water, and land. She holds a bowl that symbolizes what binds all of us: our family and our community. A series of flower sculptures representing the love and beauty that spring forth from us into our community comprises the second part of the installation. The flowers were co-created by the community members at the collaborative workshops, then fabricated in wood and hung around the iron fence, which traditionally sets boundaries but here communicates a sense of togetherness and collaboration.

This project is part of Queens Council on the Arts' public art program titled, ArtSite, supported by the Queens Council on the Arts with funds from NYS Regional Economic Development Council in partnership with the New York State Council on the Arts, with additional support from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

Image: Brittany Baldwin, Steinway Cipher, Courtesy of the artist

Brittany Baldwin, Steinway Cipher
June 11, 2018 to June 10, 2019
Steinway Playground, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For Steinway Cypher, Baldwin merged contributions of the Steinway family with elements of present-day Astoria to create a piece that reflects the visual landscape of the neighborhood. In 1870 William Steinway began building a company town, Steinway Village in what is now known as Astoria. The Steinway Piano Factory was built on this land accompanied by employee housing, a church, a library, a kindergarten, and a public trolley line. Steinway also founded the resort town North Beach and spearheaded a project to extend his town’s trolley lines under the East River, which led to the creation of the current subway tunnel

A large, white piano-like shape positioned in the middle of the mural commemorates the industry titan. Aquatic and seashell forms are a nod to North Beach and the East River. Arrows highlight the progressive nature of Steinway’s ideas. Some of Baldwin’s other shapes are a response to the mosaics seen on Mombar, a restaurant in Astoria’s Little Egypt. Additional elements of commerce are sprinkled throughout to honor local businesses that find their home on Steinway Street.

Image: Zaq Landsberg, Islands of the Unisphere, photo courtesy of the artist.

Zaq Landsberg, Islands of the Unisphere
June 11, 2018 to June 10, 2019
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Zaq Landsberg recreated several of the famed Unisphere’s islands from various continents at scale and placed them together to form a global archipelago. The collection of islands act as seating, stages, and meeting places, and reflects the diversity Queens. These continents, figuratively stitched together, are recognizable by their shapes, but will have neither labels nor borders.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Pages:< Prev191011121314Next >

Was this information helpful?