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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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2018

Manhattan

Cheryl Wing-Zi Wong, Constellation
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Seward Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Constellation is an architectural sculpture, performance, and panel series that activates the underused plaza in Seward Park as a transformative community public space. The site-specific sculptural pavilion is composed of interlocked wooden modules that will be re-arranged and transformed seasonally in three different configurations over the course of the exhibition.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Capucine Bourcart, LINOUQ
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Thomas Jefferson Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

From 2008 to 2012, Capucine Bourcart walked every street in Manhattan, from State Street to 220th Street, taking photographic details of walls along her route. This collection of photographs is used to create a photo-assemblage made of 4,170 metal squares that hang from a chain link fence in a design inspired by those of Native Americans’, the island’s first inhabitants.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

RECLINING FIGURE (Buddhaâ??s Classic Pose) 2018, Installation in Seward Park, Hestor & Essex Streets, Lower East Side, NY, supported by the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant, Ann Gillen sculptor/Artists Rights Society(ARS) NY, photo Mark

Ann Gillen, RECLINING FIGURE (Buddhaâ??s Classic Pose)
February 9, 2018 to May 25, 2018
Seward Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
RECLINING FIGURE (Buddha’s Classic Pose) explores the theme of the reclining figure, a form that can be found in sculpture all over the world. The white and yellow painted sculpture is constructed in three overlapping units that represent the legs, torso, head and arm of an abstracted, lounging human form. The simplicity of the sculpture will make a restful addition to the park for the many who use it. The path of the sun allows for the daily drama of shadow and light to illuminate each tilted plane at different times. 

Leonard Ursachi, What a Wonderful World
June 26, 2017 to May 15, 2018
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Romanian artist Leonard Ursachi’s “What a Wonderful World” is a large, egg-shaped sculpture woven from branches, on which a world map has been sketched with pigmented cement. It has two recessed embrasures, each inset with a stainless steel mirror. The form and woven branches evoke nests, birth, history, and nature, while the map may be read as humanity’s trace. The title can be interpreted as ironic, cautionary, or celebratory, depending on the viewer’s perspective. Ursachi’s art often addresses the impact of people and their governments on the earth, in addition to examining the impact of borders on individuals and societies.

Installation view of Darren Bader, such are promises, 2016. On view January 21 – February 20, 2016 at Sadie Coles HQ, London. Courtesy of the artist and Sadie Coles HQ

Darren Bader, chess: relatives
May 6, 2017 to April 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Located on the High Line at 13th Street, New York-based artist Darren Bader’s chess: relatives consists of a large-scale chessboard designed by the artist. Visitors are invited to take part in chess games during open park hours in which they take the place of chess pieces, their positions determined by their familial relationships to others. In order to play, visitors bring a group of 32 people together, who will be “played” by two additional people. Visitors are encouraged to assemble teams with their own friends or family, or to branch out and recruit strangers also visiting the High Line. Referring to the onsite instructions, the group self-organizes according to chess: relatives rules.

Once the group is organized into the pieces they fit into, the two players play the game, moving the human “pieces” as in a standard game of chess. Once the game begins, the players are no longer allowed to ask for clarification on what kind of piece each person represents. As one of the most interactive artworks exhibited on the High Line, chess: relatives will spark new connections, conversations, and debate amongst visitors. The piece also gives visitors the chance to become a part of an artwork that aims to ask more questions about art than it can answer.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Courtesy of the artist

Suprina, In Someone Else’s Shoes
October 19, 2017 to April 30, 2018
Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Suprina’s installation titled In Someone Else’s Shoes is a 5’ high shoe that one can sit in, on, or under and imagine what it’s like to literally and figuratively be in someone else’s shoes. The surface of the shoe is a mosaic of objects that any of us might toss away but also binds us together. Viewers and sitters are encouraged to explore the surface with sight and touch to find objects with which they or a fellow sitter might personally relate.  

The New Bench is a series of public art projects in which three artists reinvent the park bench to challenge ideas around parks, communal places and how communities coexist within these spaces. The artists play with materials and structure to encourage conversation across ages and cultures and create a dialogue with the natural and urban environments. 

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance  and the Art in FLUX.

Courtesy of the artist

Hugh Hayden, The Jones Part II
November 4, 2017 to April 30, 2018
Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
The Jones Part II by Hugh Hayden is part of a body of work that explores camouflage as a means of assimilation into social environments.  The work mimics a park picnic table constructed from rough-hewn fallen trees.  The profusion of branches appear static and unclear, as if they are either growing from the wood or disintegrating.  The branches prevent the picnic table from being used, instead offering a reflection on our relationship with nature as a material resource and the setting of social interactions.

The New Bench is a series of public art projects in which three artists reinvent the park bench to challenge ideas around parks, communal places and how communities coexist within these spaces. The artists play with materials and structure to encourage conversation across ages and cultures and create a dialogue with the natural and urban environments. 

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance  and Art in FLUX. 

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

William Logan, Flame
May 15, 2017 to April 14, 2018
Tramway Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

With a background in architecture and design, William Logan has focused on large scale public sculpture for the past 15 years. Drawing and model-making have been constant endeavors while his experience in engineering and boat-building has given him an intuitive feel for structure. Flame is the result of experimental work with carbon fiber and lightweight structures. The intricate surface texture reflects the laborious effort that went into the fabrication of the piece by hand and allows the piece to catch the light in unexpected ways. The open lattice of the upper element lends the work a diaphanous quality, while its construction in aluminum gives it structure.

Dora Budor, The Forecast (New York Situation), 2017. Part of Mutations, a High Line Commission. On view April 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Mutations
April 20, 2017 to March 31, 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Mutations is an open-air group exhibition that explores the relationship between man and nature, looking at how the boundaries between the natural world and culture are defined, crossed, and obliterated. The exhibition is inspired by the High Line as a controlled environment that encapsulates, on the one hand, the modern dream of humans taming nature, and on the other, the promise of nature reclaiming its control.

Artists who are part of this exhibition include Larry Bamburg, Alisa Baremboym, Sascha Bruanig, Dora Budor, Radamés Juni Figueroa, Guan Xiao, Marguerite Humeau, Veit Laurent Kurz, Joanna Malinowska, Jumana Manna, Jon Rafman, and Max Hooper Schneider.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape from Gravity, 2017. On view June 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity
June 2017 to March 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For over 50 years, American artist Sheila Hicks has redefined the boundaries of fiber as a medium, creating a distinctive body of work that falls between the fields of fine art, craft, design, and architecture. For her High Line Commission, Hicks draws inspiration from the many kinetic elements that dance around the High Line: the ballet of construction vehicles at the Rail Yards; the multitudinous interwoven layers of construction mesh that cover buildings, scaffolding, and streetscapes; unfinished architectural lattices; and lace of hanging crane cables. Her vibrant installation comprised of twisting tubes of various types of colored fiber will crawl along the rails at the Western Rail Yards, surprising and delighting passersby.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

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