NYC Resources311Office of the Mayor

Official Website of the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation

Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Celebrating 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of our Art in the Parks program! Visit more than 50 public artworks currently on view in our parks, and celebrate with us at our upcoming anniversary events!

Celebrate 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Public Art Map and Guide

Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

View the map

Search Current and Past Exhibits

  to  

2018

Manhattan

Rendering Courtesy of the artist, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo, and Friends of the High Line. ©Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor, the floaters
March 17, 2017 to March 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Henry Taylor is a painter known for his intimate depictions of people, capturing a wide range of subjects that span from his close friends and family, to strangers whose appearances strike him, to celebrities within the African American community. His color–blocked compositions evoke compassion and a sense of shared space, setting the viewer in close conversation with those pictured.

For the High Line, Taylor presents a new version of a self-portrait adapted specifically for its setting on the side of a building at West 22nd Street. The work depicts the artist and a friend “blissed out,” relaxing in a swimming pool at a friend’s house in Palm Springs. Reminiscent of David Hockney’s paintings of Los Angeles swimming pools from the 1960s, the floaters, a title which references the eponymous Detroit R&B group, portrays the artist in a moment of pure, leisurely happiness.

This exhibition is presented by High Line Art.

Dora Budor, The Forecast (New York Situation), 2017. Part of Mutations, a High Line Commission. On view April 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Mutations
April 20, 2017 to March 31, 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Mutations is an open-air group exhibition that explores the relationship between man and nature, looking at how the boundaries between the natural world and culture are defined, crossed, and obliterated. The exhibition is inspired by the High Line as a controlled environment that encapsulates, on the one hand, the modern dream of humans taming nature, and on the other, the promise of nature reclaiming its control.

Artists who are part of this exhibition include Larry Bamburg, Alisa Baremboym, Sascha Bruanig, Dora Budor, Radamés Juni Figueroa, Guan Xiao, Marguerite Humeau, Veit Laurent Kurz, Joanna Malinowska, Jumana Manna, Jon Rafman, and Max Hooper Schneider.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape from Gravity, 2017. On view June 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity
June 2017 to March 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For over 50 years, American artist Sheila Hicks has redefined the boundaries of fiber as a medium, creating a distinctive body of work that falls between the fields of fine art, craft, design, and architecture. For her High Line Commission, Hicks draws inspiration from the many kinetic elements that dance around the High Line: the ballet of construction vehicles at the Rail Yards; the multitudinous interwoven layers of construction mesh that cover buildings, scaffolding, and streetscapes; unfinished architectural lattices; and lace of hanging crane cables. Her vibrant installation comprised of twisting tubes of various types of colored fiber will crawl along the rails at the Western Rail Yards, surprising and delighting passersby.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Erwin Redl, Whiteout, 2017. Steel, animated white LEDs, stainless steel cable, low voltage insulated wire, two sections: each 12 x 40 x 180 feet; overall: 12 x 110 x 180 feet. Collection of the artist. © Erwin Redl. Photos: Rashmi Gill

Erwin Redl, Whiteout
November 16, 2017 to March 25, 2018
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Whiteout, a newly commissioned public art project by artist Erwin Redl, is comprised of hundreds of transparent white spheres, each embedded with a discrete, white LED light and suspended from a square grid of steel poles and cabling. The orbs are opportunistic, gently swaying with the wind currents from their positions of one foot above the ground plane. The white LEDs are animated in large-scale patterns superimposing a virtual movement on top of the kinetic movement of the spheres. The sequence of light is an incandescent treatment of urban public space across the dark seasons of the late fall and winter. Erwin Redl is best known for creating spectacular light projects on the facades of buildings. Whiteout is the thirty-fifth outdoor exhibition organized by Madison Square Park Conservancy. 

This exhibition is presented by Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Image credit: Erwin Redl, Whiteout, 2017. Steel, animated white LEDs, stainless steel cable, low voltage insulated wire, two sections: each 12 x 40 x 180 feet; overall: 12 x 110 x 180 feet. Collection of the artist. © Erwin Redl. Photos: Rashmi Gill

Rendering courtesy of ArandaLasch + Marcelo Coelho with Formlabs.

ArandaLasch + Marcelo Coelho, Window to the Heart
February 1, 2018 to February 28, 2018
Father Duffy Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
?

In one of the world’s most Instagrammed places, filled with cameras of all shapes and sizes, Window to the Heart places the world’s largest lens in the center of Times Square. The 12 foot in diameter Fresnel lens was designed with 3D-printing manufacturer Formlabs to distort and capture the image of Times Square, optically bending light – and attention – to the heart-shaped window at its center. Visitors can look through the window or photograph themselves within it, completing the loop between the lens of the eye and the lens of the camera.

Rather than using the traditional lens-making methods of casting, cutting, and repeatedly polishing glass, Window to the Heart will leverage the latest advances in design, materials, and fabrication to craft something that was previously unattainable. Each lens segment is 3D-printed at a high resolution by Formlabs using clear resin, a material capable of the unique surface quality and clarity required by optical elements. With the lens made entirely from a 3D-printed material instead of glass, Window to the Heart upends the centuries-old methods of lens-making to invite individuals to reimagine how they see and photograph the world.

This project is presented by Times Square Alliance and Design Trust for Public Space.

Joy Brown, Joy Brown on Broadway
May 17, 2017 to February 17, 2018
Broadway Malls from 72nd Street to 166th Street
Broadway Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

The Broadway Mall Association celebrates its 30th anniversary with Joy Brown on Broadway, a sculpture exhibition of nine bronze works on the green malls at the center of Broadway from 72nd Street to 166th Street. The exhibition is the 10th sculpture show that the Broadway Mall Association has presented on the malls since 2005. Brown’s rounded forms and use of bronze convey the heavy gravity of stone. The playful expressions and gestures of her figures transcend that weight, suggesting warmth and lightness of being. Simplicity of form and earth-toned patina evoke a feeling of stillness and peace. The influence of the Japanese aesthetic on Brown’s sculpture springs from her childhood in Japan and apprenticeship in traditional Japanese ceramics.

This exhibition is presented by Broadway Mall Association and Morrison Gallery.

Image credit: Photo by Jason Wyche, courtesy of Public Art Fund

Ai Weiwei, Arch, Good Fences Make Good Neighbors
October 12, 2017 to February 11, 2018
Washington Square Park, Manhattan

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?

Ai Weiwei often visited Washington Square Park when he lived nearby in the 1980s, drawn to its vitality as a hub for creative and political expression. His 37-foot-tall steel cage echoes the iconic form of the marble arch, which commemorates George Washington leading the nation toward democracy. While seeming to create an obstruction, Ai opens a passageway through its center in the silhouette of two united figures. Visitors are able to pass through, reflected in an undulating ribbon of polished stainless steel.

This work is part of the citywide exhibition Good Fences Make Good Neighbors. Ai Weiwei conceived this multi-site, multi-media exhibition for public spaces, monuments, buildings, transportation sites, and advertising platforms throughout New York City. Collectively, these elements comprise a passionate response to the global migration crisis and a reflection on the profound social and political impulse to divide people from each other. Visitors will discover that Ai’s “good fences” are not impenetrable barriers but powerful, immersive, and resonant additions to the fabric of the city.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Photo by Ai Weiwei Studio, courtesy of Public Art Fund

Ai Weiwei, Gilded Cage, Good Fences Make Good Neighbors
October 12, 2017 to February 11, 2018
Central Park, Manhattan
Central Park, Manhattan

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For the entrance to Central Park, Ai has created a giant gilded cage that simultaneously evokes the luxury of Fifth Avenue and the privations of confinement. Visitors are able to enter its central space, which is surrounded by bars and turnstiles. Functioning as a structure of both control and display, the work reveals the complex power dynamics of repressive architecture.

This work is part of the citywide exhibition Good Fences Make Good Neighbors. Ai Weiwei conceived this multi-site, multi-media exhibition for public spaces, monuments, buildings, transportation sites, and advertising platforms throughout New York City. Collectively, these elements comprise a passionate response to the global migration crisis and a reflection on the profound social and political impulse to divide people from each other. Visitors will discover that Ai’s “good fences” are not impenetrable barriers but powerful, immersive, and resonant additions to the fabric of the city.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Image courtesy of Hudson Square Connection

Various Artists, Hudson Square: Through Our Eyes
July 12, 2017 to February 1, 2018
Spring Street Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Consisting of photographs taken in the neighborhood around Spring Street Park, this exhibition features the work of students from Chelsea Career & Technical Education High School. Magic Box Productions teaching artist Jon Appel and visiting artist Martin Crook worked closely with the senior students as a photography, documentary team on this project. Magic Box Productions addresses the growing need for exemplary media arts education in New York City’s public K-12 schools, particularly those serving disadvantaged students with limited access to art and technology. The images capture the unique aspects of history, commerce, architecture and other features of the Hudson Square neighborhood.

This exhibition is presented by Hudson Square Connection and Magic Box Productions.

Aaron Schraeter, Birdhouse Repo
January 30, 2017 to January 1, 2018
First Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Birdhouse Repo reflects on the effects of a constantly growing population alongside income disparities in one of the world’s fastest moving cities. This oversized birdhouse, which is boarded up and placed under foreclosure, sits in the heart of a neighborhood that is one of the most historical and notable examples of New York City’s gentrification and the real estate bubble. Simply put, the city has become so expensive that even the birds cannot afford to live here. This work is Aaron Schaeter’s first public sculpture exhibition.

This exhibition is presented by First Street Green.

Pages:< Prev12345Next >

Was this information helpful?