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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Celebrating 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of our Art in the Parks program! Visit more than 50 public artworks currently on view in our parks, and celebrate with us at our upcoming anniversary events!

Celebrate 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Public Art Map and Guide

Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

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Search Current and Past Exhibits

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2017

Queens

Meg Webster, Concave Room for Bees
May 8, 2016 to March 13, 2017
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

With robust plantings of native grasses and flowers, and herbs, Meg Webster’s Concave Room for Bees is both sculptural and ecological. Webster highlights the complex interactions of organic systems in the piece in a variety of ways, such as selecting greenery that attracts pollinators and exposing the soil layers for viewing. Park visitors are encouraged to use paths to walk through the work, experiencing it in the round. The work is multi-sensory, a mix of botanical aromas, insect hums, dewy air, and vibrantly colored flora.

This exhibition was originally part of LANDMARK, a series of artist commissions and projects that marked Socrates Sculpture Park’s 30th anniversary in 2016. The works transformed the land both physically and symbolically. LANDMARK directly addressed the idea of place as intimately tied to social and ecological structures, to maintenance and stewardship, and to evolution over time.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Various Artists, EAF16: Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition
September 25, 2016 to March 13, 2017
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Inaugurated in 2000, Socrates Sculpture Park’s annual Emerging Artist Fellowship (EAF) Exhibition offers a rare opportunity for emerging artists to realize original, large-scale, complex outdoor work. The 15 selected artists are provided with an open studio along with financial, administrative, and technical support. From May through September EAF artists work on-site, negotiating the physical and conceptual challenges of production in the park’s outdoor studio space, enhancing the park’s popular summer programming. The resulting site-specific works are physically and ideologically diverse and address the past, present, and future of the park as it celebrates its 30th anniversary year.

This year’s Emerging Artist Fellows were selected through a highly competitive process by the park’s 2016 Curatorial Advisors, Larissa Harris (Curator, Queens Museum) and Amanda Hunt (Assistant Curator, Studio Museum in Harlem). The 2016 Emerging Artist Fellows are: Liene Bosquê, Travis Boyer, Andrew Brehm, Lea Cetera, Dachal Choi and Mathew Suen, Onyedika Chuke, Galería Perdida, Dylan Gauthier, Dmitri Hertz, Madeline Hollander, Olalekan Jeyifous, Lia Lowenthal, Sable Elyse Smith, Elizabeth Tubergen, and Bryan Zanisnik.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Lisa Oppenheim, Broadway Billboard: APPLAUSE
September 25, 2016 to March 12, 2017
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

For her Broadway Billboard, APPLAUSE, Oppenheim creates the vision of a “truly” blue rose by digitally shifting color tones of a stock photograph. This work evolves from the artist’s ongoing study of color and perception, focusing on the impossibility of a “natural” blue rose. Through research Oppenheim learned that blue roses cannot occur without human intervention. For centuries blue roses were created by adding blue dye to white roses, but in 2004 a Japanese company produced a blue rose through genetic engineering.

Appropriately, folklore of various cultures often use the blue rose as symbols of the impossible or unattainable. In tales and poetry, it has also represented unrequited love, blinding phantasm, and deceptive illusion. Now situated in the leafy landscape and post-industrial neighborhood at Socrates Sculpture Park, it takes on an enigmatic tone. As genetic modification organisms are currently hotly debated—both championed as a solution to global hunger and derided as potentially toxic agents–are these blue roses ominous or gloriousΑ

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Staten Island

Lina Montoya, Mariposas Lamps
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Faber Pool and Park, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s Cien Años de Soledad, Montoya’s illuminated sculptures redefine the monarch butterfly as an icon of migration and freedom. This work is part of the series La Isla Bonita, a beautification project that seeks to transform public spaces through public art and community engagement.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Fitzhugh Karol, Eyes
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Tappen Park, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Eyes’ intersecting steel shapes are derived from the simple silhouettes of hillsides and stairs, and frame the park’s historic Village Hall. The integrated play feature provides a chance to engage with the work in a way that most sculptures do not allow, appealing to the community in a fundamental way.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Susan Stair, Tree Reflections
October 15, 2016 to October 14, 2017
Conference House Park, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Tree Reflections is a series of clay tiles cast from two Osage Orange trees combined with mosaic pieces that tells the story of two parks. The main components of this artwork are cast from an Osage Orange tree in Marcus Garvey Park near the artist’s home in Harlem. After visiting Conference House Park, Stair cast four clay extensions from the Osage Orange tree there, which were added to the existing artwork. Stair’s aims to create portraits of trees through her work. The clay that she presses onto living trees records their species, age, and strength. She was particularly attracted to the trees’ remarkable patterns, bending forms, and endurance, physical qualities that demonstrate the unique historical importance of this species.

An additional exhibition of Stair’s work in the Conference House Park Visitor Center’s Lenape Gallery will open on November 25 as part of Native American Heritage month.

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