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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Image caption: Benches installed in Prospect Park Parade Ground, Brooklyn (image courtesy of CEI Arts Education)

Center for Educational Innovation, CEI Arts Education BENCHMARKS: Youth Setting the Standard for Social Change
June 8, 2019 to September 6, 2019
Various Locations

Description:

In this current climate, BENCHMARKS provides NYC youth with a public platform to express themselves on current issues in a constructive, creative and powerful way to effect social change. This comprehensive, student arts residency program inspires young people to confront major social issues and become engaged citizens through creating large-scale, meaningful artworks on benches for public display citywide, to effect social change. The resulting 30 benches have been colorfully painted to share the students’ messages with parkgoers in all five boroughs. This program serves up to 750 New York City public school students in grades 5-9 in 30 schools in disadvantaged communities citywide.

Locations: The benches can be found in Mullaly Park in the Bronx, Prospect Park Parade Ground in Brooklyn, Tompkins Square Park in Manhattan, Hoyt Avenue Sitting Area in Queens, and North Shore Esplanade in Staten Island.

This exhibition is presented by the Center for Educational Innovation’s Arts Education Program.

Image credit: Wood panels by students from World Journalism Preparatory School, Queens, installed in Auburndale Park, Queens (image courtesy of LEAP)

LEAP, LEAP's Public Art Exhibition: Empowering Students Through Social Justice and Visual Arts
June 5, 2019 to August 26, 2019
Various Locations

Description:
LEAP’s Public Art Program uses a social justice framework to empower middle and high school students to have a voice in their communities and express themselves on social issues through the creation and public exhibition of art. This program instills social responsibility and civic engagement, imparts artistic skills, concepts and techniques, and fosters peer leadership, self-confidence and collaboration. As part of each residency, students have a unique opportunity to meet with world-renowned artists at their studios, as well as galleries, museums, exhibitions, and other sites. For this year’s public art exhibition, students from seven New York City public middle schools in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island have adorned wood panels and small sculptural seating elements with colorful painted murals that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe.

The tables can be found in Joyce Kilmer Park and Tremont Park in the Bronx, Coffey Park and South Oxford Park in Brooklyn, Auburndale Park and Evergreen Park in Queens, and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

This exhibition is presented by LEAP.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Various Artists, Sing for Hope Pianos
June 4, 2019 to June 23, 2019
Various Locations

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?The Sing for Hope Pianos places artist-designed pianos throughout NYC’s parks and public spaces for anyone and everyone to play. Each summer, the pianos bring individuals and communities together in an open festival of art for all. After their time on the streets, Sing for Hope transports the instruments to NYC public schools, where they become hubs for Sing for Hope’s ongoing creative programs and enrich students’ lives for years to come. This June, Sing for Hope will place its 500th unique piano artwork in the five boroughs, making NYC host to more street pianos than any other city in the world. As New York City’s largest recurring public art project, the Sing for Hope Pianos impacts an estimated 2 million people each year. 

For more information and a list of locations visit Sing for Hope’s Pop-Up Pianos website

This exhibition is present by Sing for Hope.

Image Credit: Justin Brice Guariglia, Climate Signals, courtesy of the artist

Justin Brice Guariglia, Climate Signals
September 1, 2018 to November 6, 2018

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Prominent, unexpected messages about climate change dot the New York City landscape, sparking curiosity and raising awareness. The exhibition consists of ten large, solar-powered highway signs with phrases that draw passers-by into the climate conversation. The signs will appear in parks across the city in a range of neighborhoods, including some of those most vulnerable to climate change, and will flash translations into several of the many languages of NYC.

This fall programming is made possible by a range of intense collaborations that appropriately represent the partnership and joint action needed to tackle climate change. Fifteen citywide partners will co-host a broad range of programming related to the exhibition and to moving forward together on the climate challenge. NYC Parks locations include Hunts Point Riverside Park and St. Mary’s Park, Bronx; Sunset Park, Brooklyn; St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan; Flushing Meadows Corona Park (starting Sept 10) and Rockaway Beach at Beach 94th Street, Queens. Visit climate-signals.org for the full list of locations.

This exhibition is presented by the Climate Museum.

courtesy of NYC Parks

Various Artists, Sing for Hope Pianos
June 4, 2018 to June 24, 2018
Various Locations

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?In one of New York City’s most vibrant public art installations, 51 unique artist-designed pianos are placed in parks and public spaces throughout the city’s five boroughs, including 32 in NYC Parks, for anyone and everyone to play. For three weeks this June, the pianos will bring individuals and communities together in an open festival of art for all. After their time on the streets, Sing for Hope will transport the instruments to permanent homes in NYC public schools, where they will become hubs for Sing for Hope’s ongoing creative programs and enrich students’ lives for years to come. As New York City’s largest recurring public art project, the Sing for Hope Pianos impacts an estimated 2 million people each year. For more information and a list of locations visit Sing for Hope’s Pop-Up Pianos website.

This exhibition is present by Sing for Hope.

Image credit: Chat Travieso, The Boogie Down (Youth) Booth, courtesy of the artist.

Chat Travieso, The Boogie Down (Youth) Booth
June 1, 2019 to May 31, 2020
Keltch Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Boogie Down (Youth) Booth is colorful public installation that brings Bronx music, solar-powered lights, seating, and community art to an underutilized space at Keltch Park on 170th Street and Jerome Avenue in the Highbridge/Concourse area of the South Bronx.

it follows three previous booths, installed between 2014 and 2016 at different sites in Crotona Park East and Melrose. Designed by Chat Travieso, this newest booth was informed by the “Yes Loitering” Project, a public space and safety youth initiative that sought to investigate how teens might be excluded from or targeted in public spaces, and developed ideas on how to create more youth-powered spaces. The research project was led by Travieso and a team of Bronx teens from the area. The group of young researchers met with community members, merchants, and other key stakeholders to gather valuable input regarding neighborhood needs.

Like all previous booths, the Boogie Down (Youth) Booth pays tribute to the rich culture of the Bronx, as expressed through music. It incorporates solar-powered speakers that stream music continuously, featuring a playlist curated by Elena Martinez and Bobby Sanabria of WHEDco’s Bronx Music Heritage Center, showcasing the sounds of the borough, including salsa, jazz, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, hip-hop, Garifuna, and blues.

This exhibition is presented by WHEDco

Image: Lovie Pignata, Bronx River Native, Courtesy of the artist.

Sohhee Oh, Lovie Pignata, and Moses Ros, Art in Concrete Plant Park
September 28, 2018 to September 27, 2019
Concrete Plant Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Artists Sohhee Oh, Lovie Pignata, and Moses Ros have installed public artworks along the length of Concrete Plant Park. The Communal Bench by Sohhee Oh is an uncommonly long bench made out of painted concrete blocks with images of native plants from the Foodway—materials that unify the conflicting history of the site. Pignata installed three geometric designs created with large, painted concrete pavers. Bronx River Native references the borough’s original inhabitants, the Mohegan, as well as its current residents. Ros’ Paradise Trail uses a series colorful flags to guide the public between the entrances at Westchester Avenue and Bruckner Boulevard. The flag designs were created with input from the community and celebrate the river, the Foodway, and the community’s heritage.

Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections.

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented by the Bronx River Alliance, with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image Credit: Andre Trenier, Rep Your Flag, Courtesy of ArtBridge

Andre Trenier, Rep Your Flag
September 20, 2018 to September 19, 2019
Inwood Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Lifelong Bronx resident Andre Trenier presents “Rep Your Flag”—an homage to the immigrant communities that give the Bronx its strength.  The 16 included flags were determined directly from community feedback: Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Ghana, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Italy, Jamaica, Mexico, Pan-African, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago

This exhibition is presented by the ArtBridge.

Art in the Parks: Active Open Space is a partnership between NYC Parks and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, in collaboration with the Fund for Public Health in NYC and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to activate park space with health-inspired art installations that promote physical activity and strengthen community connections. Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image Credit: Cara Lynch, I’m So Happy You’re Here, Courtesy of the artist

Cara Lynch, I’m So Happy You’re Here
July 18, 2018 to July 19, 2019
Virginia Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Cara Lynch explores the tension between high and low, and private and public space in I’m So Happy You’re Here. Its patterns reference traditional parquet flooring, typically found in homes of the wealthy as a symbol of status and importance. By recontextualizing these patterns in a public mural, the work challenges notions of value and accessibility, as well as destination and origin.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Lady K Fever, Pond
July 15, 2018 to July 14, 2019
Mosholu Playground, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
?Lady K Fever’s mural creates the impression of a lush pond in the middle of the playground spray shower. The formerly worn utility now hosts vibrant images of plant life, turtles, and a spritely seal.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of Mosholu Parkland.

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