Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Amanda Long, Wishing Well, photo courtesy of the artist

Amanda Long, Wishing Well

October 29, 2016 to October 3, 2017
Dyckman Farmhouse Museum
, Manhattan

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Wishing Well, a playful, site-specific, interactive sculpture, is an updated, technological interpretation of a fairy tale wishing well, a popular theme in European folklore. Wishing wells were believed to grant requests by way of magical waters or deities residing within. Visitors of all ages are encouraged to speak a wish into the well. The words are translated into a video ripple inside, and an echo repeats the words back. Turning the well’s crank activates video and microphone recordings, which are captured in a database inside the sculpture. The recordings will be curated and presented on a dedicated website, wishingwellnyc.org, bringing the artwork beyond the physical space of the park.

The Dyckman Farmhouse, a Dutch Colonial style farmhouse built c. 1784, was opened as a museum in 1916. Today it is nestled in a small garden and is an extraordinary reminder of early Manhattan and important part of the diverse Inwood neighborhood. The original well has long been absent from the house, although a replacement well-head was constructed around 1915-1916 during the restoration of the farmhouse. This well-head was removed sometime in the 1980’s and replaced by a simple wood platform. Installed at the site of the original well on the Dyckman property, Long’s video sculpture enlivens the vacant well site as a fantasy restoration.

This exhibition is presented by the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and the Historic House Trust, with support from the New York State Council on the Arts.

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