Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Current Exhibits

Citywide

Photo credit: Zynab Cewalam, “Malikah: Building Power and Safety in Our Communities” in Astoria Park; Courtesy of Photoville

Various Artists, Photoville NYC 2021
September 18, 2021 to December 1, 2021
Various Locations

Description:

Photoville NYC 2021 marks the 10th year of the annual festival and its second year bringing photography to all five boroughs in New York City. The festival celebrates and showcases photographers and organizations from New York and around the world and vitally broadens the possibilities of art experienced beyond museum and gallery spaces. At Photoville NYC 2021, the beauty and specificity of New York’s myriad outdoor settings become backdrops for arresting visions of multitudinous and diverging realities.

In addition to the public displays, Photoville has also put together a calendar of events surrounding the festival, including artist talks, workshops, demonstrations, educational programs, storytelling events, and community programming.

Locations: Exhibitions in parks can be found in Barretto Point Park and Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx; Anchorage Plaza in Brooklyn; Chelsea Park, East River Esplanade, First Park, Little Flower Playground, and St. Nicholas Park in Manhattan; Astoria Park and Travers Park in Queens; and Alice Austen House and South Beach Promenade in Staten Island. This exhibition is presented by Photoville.

Bronx

Image credit: courtesy of the artist

Anina Gerchick, BIRDLINK
May 22, 2021 to May 21, 2022
Crotona Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

BIRDLINK is an interactive habitat sculpture whose mission is to support migratory birds by inserting native plant systems throughout the urban and suburban corridors through which they travel. BIRDLINK attracts the wild birds that reside or migrate through the city with native plants at the empty lower and middle canopy levels. It responds to community interests, highlights the shared the urban ecosystem, bridges cultural differences through the universality of birds, and serves as an educational tool.

Image credit: Photo courtesy of worthless studios

KaN Landscape Design and Caroline Mardok, In honor of Black Lives Matter
May 15, 2021 to April 18, 2022
Poe Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This interactive installation of multiple cut out figures made of plywood are applied with collage and photographs from Mardok’s @ny.strong photography project. As people walk through the portals they’re transported into the energy of the protests of 2020: the unified experience of citizens across ethnicities and genders fighting for freedom and justice for Black lives. The team has also collaborated with the Bronx River Art Center on a program focused on public art and activism, offered to a team of young adults who are creating their own sculptures and photographs. Their work will be shown in a group exhibition responding to the Black lives Matter movement, in conjunction with the installation of KaN+Mardok’s sculptures at Poe Park in the Bronx.

The Plywood Protection Project is an initiative to collect the plywood used by NYC businesses to board up their windows during the protests of 2020 and redistribute it to artists, extending and repurposing the life of this material. Arts not-for-profit worthless studios collected over 200 boards of plywood and initiated an open call for artists, eventually selecting five local makers to participate in a unifying public art project across all five boroughs of New York. This piece is one of the five created by the project, each installed in a different borough of New York City.

This exhibition is presented by worthless studios.

Image courtesy of Publicolor

Publicolor, Fractured Spectrum
November 9, 2020 to November 8, 2021
Franz Sigel Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This mural’s abstract design captures motion with colors that convey an abundance of energy and brings life to this exterior retaining wall along Walton Avenue. Residents in the community and park visitors will develop a joy and appreciation of color, and how it affects our moods and behavior. This mural was painted by Publicolor, a youth development program that fights poverty by aggressively addressing the alarming dropout rate and low levels of educational attainment and youth employment in New York City. The program engages high-risk, low-income students, ages 12-24, in a multi-year continuum of design-based programs to encourage academic achievement, college preparation, job readiness, and community service.

Photo credit: Sean Desiree, Beam Ensemble, 2021, sculpture, 12' x 12' x 5', installation view, Crotona Park, Bronx, August 26 - October 26, 2021. Photo courtesy of More Art.

Sean Desiree, BEAM ENSEMBLE
August 26, 2021 to October 26, 2021
Crotona Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

BEAM ENSEMBLE is an outdoor orchestra that creates a space intended for the public to establish a connection with the buried history of African American composers. The piece has four distinct sections, each representing a different instrument originating from the African diaspora, including a kora, percussion, an amadinda, and a tongue drum. The significance of this structure runs deeper than the visual appeal of art in public spaces—it is an invitation for interpersonal and intercultural connection. Even if it’s only for a few minutes, both friends and strangers become a part of an impromptu ensemble.

This exhibition is presented by More Art.

Brooklyn

Image credit: Courtesy of Community Heroes

Jasmin Chang and Trellis, Community Heroes
August 10, 2021 to August 9, 2022
St. Andrew's Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Community Heroes aims to bring together residents in the neighborhood of Bedford-Stuyvesant and celebrate those who empower and nourish these neighborhoods. Individuals were selected as representatives of the community, or heroes, from a pool of nominations collected during a community outreach process. Community Heroes seeks to tell the stories of the neighborhoods’ unsung heroes through the collaboration of newer residents and long-time residents, often people of color whose families have lived in the community for generations. Community Heroes continues to collect nominations for heroes and seeks photographers to take their portraits.

Image credit: Courtesy of Community Heroes

Jasmin Chang and Trellis, Community Heroes
July 7, 2021 to July 6, 2022
Commodore Barry Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Community Heroes aims to bring together residents in the neighborhoods of Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, and Farragut, and celebrate those who empower and nourish these neighborhoods. Individuals were selected as representatives of the community, or heroes, from a pool of nominations collected during a community outreach process. Community Heroes seeks to tell the stories of the neighborhoods’ unsung heroes through the collaboration of newer residents and long-time residents, often people of color whose families have lived in the community for generations. Community Heroes continues to collect nominations for heroes and seeks photographers to take their portraits.

Image credit: Courtesy of Community Heroes

Jasmin Chang and Trellis, Community Heroes
July 7, 2021 to July 6, 2022
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Community Heroes aims to bring together residents in the neighborhoods of Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, and Farragut, and celebrate those who empower and nourish these neighborhoods. Individuals were selected as representatives of the community, or heroes, from a pool of nominations collected during a community outreach process. Community Heroes seeks to tell the stories of the neighborhoods’ unsung heroes through the collaboration of newer residents and long-time residents, often people of color whose families have lived in the community for generations. Community Heroes continues to collect nominations for heroes and seeks photographers to take their portraits.

Image credit: Photo by Sebastian Bach, Courtesy of BRIC

Emily Oliveira, We Are At a Moment That Will Be Remembered as the Beginning of the Great Change, For Who Can Say When a Wall Is Ready To Come Down
October 1, 2020 to May 31, 2022
Lena Horne Bandshell
Prospect Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This monumentally scaled mural at Prospect Park’s Lena Horne Bandshell depicts a vividly colored natural landscape inhabited by humans and gods who take part in a Promethean sense of rebirth and new ways of being. The mural aims to recognize the forms of collective action that have taken place over the past year against violence, hate, and separation through walls. Oliveira envisions rebirth through such forms of collective action as joy and care—celebrating acts that often take place in public parks and natural areas like Prospect Park as a site for imagining and enacting utopia. We are at a Moment that Will be Remembered... is informed by the worlds of play and imagination, and encourages viewers to use their imaginations to envision and enact new ways of being in a post-COVID era.

This exhibition is presented by BRIC and Prospect Park Alliance.

Image credit: Max Yawney

Lara Saget, The Roots of Tuckahoe Marble
May 17, 2021 to May 16, 2022
Clumber Corner, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Roots of Tuckahoe Marble is an 8 foot-tall, public Tuckahoe marble, bronze, and glass sculpture.

Tuckahoe marble became extremely popular in the early 1800s and was used to build Borough Hall, the Washington Memorial Arch in Washington Square, and more. This historic Tuckahoe marble has mostly been quarried but there were remains in a former marble quarry turned Marriott Suites construction site in Tuckahoe, New York.

This Tuckahoe marble is encased inside of molten glass, generating a transparent, crystalline form. This form is embedded in a bronze cast piece of an organism known as Pando found in Utah's Fishlake National Forest. The glass and marble form merges with the bronze. This work suspends the marble structural material in glass, crystallizing its impermanence while contextualizing it in relation to Pando. Pando has been growing for at least 80,000 years and is the world's largest organism by mass. It has created a forest of thousands of genetically identical quaking aspen trees, which all stem from a single root system.

The Roots of Tuckahoe Marble is coupled with The Sound of Pando In Collaboration with Jerry J. Adams and the SoundMapApp The Sound of Pando is the recorded electrical differential between the leaves and the roots of Pando translated into sound.

The Roots of Tuckahoe Marble is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

The Roots of Tuckahoe Marble is a sponsored project of New York Foundation for the Arts.

Daniele Frazier, Big Bird, courtesy of the artist

Daniele Frazier, Big Bird
December 28, 2020 to December 27, 2021
Highland Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Big Bird features a six-foot-tall aluminum cutout of a white-bellied caique parrot, hand-painted in sign enamel. The bird is perched twenty feet above the ground, as if it were surveying the activities of park-goers below. Hanging from the perch is a bronze bell, recalling the types of "enrichment" toys that are provided for caged birds. In keeping with themes of Frazier's past works that depend on interaction with the weather, the bell rings in high winds and can be heard even where the piece cannot be seen.

Image credit: Courtesy of Arthur Hunking

Bryce Peterson, Hanging Gardens
August 28, 2021 to November 26, 2021
Highland Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Hanging Gardens of Brooklyn project proposes a public art installation and community gathering space, envisioned as the synthesis of an interactive sculptural pavilion and a hanging botanical garden.

The pavilion supports a hanging garden which grows in spiraling channels mounted on the trellised roof. The garden will feature a mixed palette of vining flowers and vegetables and will employ an automated drip irrigation system.

This exhibition is presented by Brooklyn Arts Council, City Artist Corps, and SITU

Image credit: Photo courtesy of worthless studios

Michael Zelehoski, Miguelito
May 15, 2021 to November 1, 2021
McCarren Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This installation proposes a new kind of public monument, one that represents all people, not just the political and economic elite. The artist uses plywood salvaged from storefronts boarded up during the Black Lives Matter protests to reexamine Egyptian obelisks, which were traditionally raised in pairs in keeping with the Egyptian values of balance and harmony. In uniting two in this sculpture, Zelehoski seeks to reclaim the symbol and propose a reconciliation of extremes. The two obelisks come together to form a caltrop, a spiked, metal object that protestors have traditionally thrown in the path of oncoming cop cars. Two decades later, participating in Black Lives Matter protests around Manhattan and Brooklyn – many culminating in McCarren park – he was reminded of these caltrops and how protest can be a powerful force for socio-political reconciliation.

The Plywood Protection Project is an initiative to collect the plywood used by NYC businesses to board up their windows during the protests of 2020 and redistribute it to artists, extending and repurposing the life of this material. Arts not-for-profit worthless studios collected over 200 boards of plywood and initiated an open call for artists, eventually selecting five local makers to participate in a unifying public art project across all five boroughs of New York. This piece is one of the five created by the project, each installed in a different borough of New York City.

This exhibition is presented by worthless studios.

Photo credit: courtesy of the artist

Rocko Rupert, TimberWolf
October 31, 2020 to October 25, 2021
Maria Hernandez Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

TimberWolf takes utilitarian materials like reclaimed lumber to beautify this corner of the park and serves as a metaphor for how everyday materials can be repurposed. It plays into the importance of resourcefulness, breathing use back into what is considered to be “used-up.” The artwork takes the form of a dog’s head, a nod to the popular nearby dog park. At the end of the public art installation period, TimberWolf will be donated to another public space to be enjoyed. The possibility to be reused or repurposed with additional functionalities gives this living installation another life.

Manhattan

Image credit: Photo by Jon Lopez, Courtesy of NBPA

A$AP Ferg, The Warrior
October 9, 2021 to October 8, 2022
Holcombe Rucker Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) commissioned Harlem native A$AP Ferg and curator Set Free Richardson to create this design for the Greg Marius Court at Holcombe Rucker Park, which pays homage to the warrior spirit of the Harlem community and embodies the essence of the many great basketball warriors of the Rucker from the past, present, and future.

This exhibition is presented by the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA).

Thomas J Price, Thomas J Price: Witness
October 2, 2021 to October 1, 2022
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Thomas J Price: Witness marks the British sculptor’s first US solo institutional exhibition. Price’s nine-foot bronze figure, The Distance Within (2021), is sited within Harlem’s Marcus Garvey Park and depicts a young Black man looking down at his cell phone. With Witness, the artist continues his exploration of blackness and Black masculinity at monumental scales. In The Distance Within, Price asks us to consider what is projected onto Black bodies as they move in the world and in what ways they are made monolithic via broader archetypes and stereotypes, as well as how Black bodies in the ordinary everyday are subject to extraordinary surveillance and spectatorship.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Image credit: Photo courtesy of the artist

Felix Marzell, BIG APPLE
October 13, 2021 to September 12, 2022
Bella Abzug Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Sitting in the Apple, users will be able to enjoy a 360-degree view of their surroundings at all times. Since the arrival of Covid-19, citizens have taken to the streets and local parks more frequently to get their daily exercise and enjoy a change of scenery. This Apple is BIG on ensuring that distancing measures are maintained while participants enjoy their urban discoveries. Not only is the modern cutout slices design airy, but the space also allows for only one family or couple at a time in the core.

This exhibition is presented by Hudson Yards Hells Kitchen Alliance.

Photo credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Sam Durant, Untitled (drone)
June 7, 2021 to August 31, 2022
The High Line Spur at West 30th Street
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This large-scale fiberglass sculpture in the shape of an abstracted drone atop a 25-foot-tall steel pole is the second High Line Plinth commission. With this work, Durant seeks to make visible the intentionally obscured drone warfare perpetuated by the US, and to remind the public that drones and surveillance are a tragic and pervasive presence in the daily lives of many living outside—and within—the United States. At the same time, drones are employed daily for humanitarian purposes, such as delivering supplies and medicine to isolated locations, to survey mine fields, and to tame wild fires that have ravaged landscapes. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image Credit: Image courtesy of Project Backboard

Faith Ringgold, Windows of the Wedding #1: Woman
August 9, 2021 to August 8, 2022
St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This basketball court mural is based on Faith Ringgold’s 1974 work, Windows of the Wedding #1: Woman. After exploring abstract shapes in the 1970s, Ringgold received acclaim for her narrative quilts created in in the 1980s. The basketball courts at St. Nicholas Park begin as an abstract pattern, but as hundreds, if not thousands, of stories play out across the courts surface it will be transformed into something of living narrative quilt. Ringgold was born in Harlem in 1930 and graduated from City College of New York (adjacent to the St. Nicholas Park).

This exhibition is presented by Project Backboard.

Naomi Lawrence, Flowers of Turtle Island
August 25, 2021 to August 4, 2022
Eugene McCabe Field, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Flowers of Turtle Island is a fiber art installation depicting a field of wild flowers that appear to be growing from the ground up so that when you walk past you will feel as if you are walking through an oversized field of flowers.

All the flower species are native to North America, in particular the northeastern part of the country. The larger flowers, lady slipper orchids and coneflowers, will loom overhead in bright colors of pink, yellow, and purple, with several shades of green.

Flowers of Turtle Island is installed on the fence that surrounds Eugene McCabe Field, adjacent to the elevated train tracks on Park Avenue.

The beauty of flowers connects people to nature and this installation will also inform people with a series of artist-guided tours. Many flowers that we now consider native to New York and New England were brought here by European settlers. The artist researched what was growing here prior to colonization to determine which species should be included. Echinacea, Coneflowers, Bluebells, Oypripedium, Lady Slipper, Aster, Goldenrod Solidago, Sanguinaria Bloodroot, Sunflowers, Violets, Rosehips all grew wild on Turtle Island, the name that the Lenape Indians used to identify the region.

Flowers of Turtle Island is made possible in part with funding from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and administered by LMCC. Additional funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance.

Image courtesy of Gotham to Go

Julio Valdez, I Can’t Breathe
July 24, 2021 to July 10, 2022
Collyer Brothers Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
I Can't Breathe is produced from a series of 6 drawings by East Harlem based artist Julio Valdez. Inspired by the images of racial injustice that have collectively entered our minds through the media over the past year. The drawings take on a transparency of almost impressionistic quality rendered with grey tones and fluid circular lines. This allover imagery reminds us the importance of not only reacting to news of injustices, but to also reflect and remember that as a community, we can overcome and reveal the creative potential in all of us, the human family.

The installation will honor Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and others, it is imperative that we continue to move the conversation forward.

I Can’t Breathe is made possible in part with funding from LMCC and Department of Cultural Affairs. Additional funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance.

Image courtesy of Marcus Garvey Park Alliance

Susan Stair, Ascending the Mountain
July 17, 2021 to July 2, 2022
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Ascending the Mountain is a public art installation that celebrates the urban forest that grew up the east side of the mountain of Manhattan Schist. Visitors climb the stairs heading up to the Harlem Fire Watchtower viewing the artwork in 3 parts as the mountain changes from rock to the tree canopy.

At the base of the stairs the first section will explore "Roots in Rock", visitors will be able to see through the fence to a view of roots growing into the rocks of the mountain. Part way up the stairs the second section "Growing Powerhouse", illustrates the trees bringing gallons of water and minerals thru their trunks to photosynthesize and produce leaves. The third section near the top of the staircase and mountain " Tree Canopy" draws the viewers focus to the view of the treetops adjacent to the Harlem Fire Watchtower

Ascending the Mountain is made possible in part with funding from the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation and administered by LMCC. Additional funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance.

Image: courtesy of the artist

Capucine Bourcart, Plastic Fantastic!
June 9, 2021 to June 26, 2022
Harlem Art Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
With Plastic Fantastic the artist takes a new approach to her public artworks working with new materials, shapes and proportions to create a site-specific work. The installation illustrates the abundance and overuse of plastic bags and packaging in our daily lives.

The scale of the installation will illustrate the abundance of single use plastics and their impact on our public spaces and on our environment. Viewers entering the park and facing the photographic assemblage will see the installation in its entirety, a colorful intervention in the space but once they get closer, they will recognize the common subject matter.

The goal of this project is to support the ban of plastic bags in New York City and to encourage residents to take responsibility for their own environmental footprint. 

Plastic Fantastic! is made possible in part with funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Friends of Art Park Alliance, and individual donors.

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

MIDABI, The Only Other
June 24, 2021 to June 23, 2022
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Created by the artist MIDABI, this steel sculptural text piece stands at 10 feet tall and 20 feet long, covered in a silver acrylic paint. His original literary works of esoteric origin are formed into visual art and produced for public display as a means of sharing information. Although agitation is a primary effect, and the approach can be cryptic, the work has an empathic core value that reaches a wide array of individuals.

Zaq Landsberg, Tomb Effigy of Margaret Corbin
June 18, 2021 to June 11, 2022
Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Tomb Effigy of Margaret Corbin pays tribute to Revolutionary War hero Margaret Corbin (1751–1800), considered the first woman to fight for America, and namesake of several Fort Tryon Park features. Corbin took control of her fallen husband’s cannon and fought during the Battle of Fort Washington at this site in 1776. The artwork takes the form of the tomb effigies at The Met Cloisters, figuratively and aesthetically stitching together the Revolutionary War battlefield and the ahistorical, relocated medieval French abbeys that comprise the Cloisters. In addition to paying homage to a lesser-known female historical figure, Landsberg’s sculpture contributes to the contemporary conversation around representation in monuments and public commemoration.

This exhibition was made possible by the Clare Weiss Emerging Artist Award. This award was made possible with support from Janet and John Koehne.

Image caption: Image courtesy Kasmin. Photography by Diego Flores

George Rickey, George Rickey Sculpture
August 30, 2021 to May 9, 2022
E. 52nd Street
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This exhibition features nine of George Rickey’s classic, large-scale kinetic sculptures, some of them not exhibited in many years. These works will showcase much of Rickey’s diverse and energetic repertoire, with the oldest first made in 1964, and the latest officially completed in 2002. On verdant Park Avenue, the show will fully realize Rickey’s theses about the bridge between the built and natural worlds. 

This exhibition is presented by Kasmin, the George Rickey Foundation, and the Fund for Park Avenue.

Image credit: Courtesy of Taglialatella Galleries

Rubem Robierb, Dream Machine II
May 4, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Description: Dream Machine II is a tribute to the human spirit. However fragile we are in our own circumstances, despite these challenges, we remain strong, resilient, and even defiant. As a monument, the wings take flight to carry the hopes of an increasingly challenged generation that dreams of a fair and just society.

This exhibition is presented by Taglialatella Galleries and Randall’s Island Park Alliance.

Image credit: Courtesy of Taglialatella Galleries

Rubem Robierb, The Peace Makers
May 4, 2021 to April 30, 2022
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inspired by recent and ongoing events and protests for racial justice, the Peace Makers is a 10-foot sculpture that serves as a tribute to peace makers around the world, who tirelessly fight for peace and justice. The sculpture is a dynamic form that represents the spirit of different cultures and races while recognizing the potential for unity in the name of progression and peace.

This exhibition is presented by Taglialatella Galleries and Randall’s Island Park Alliance.

Image credit: Connie Lee

Zaq Landsberg, Reclining Liberty
May 7, 2021 to April 25, 2022
Morningside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Reclining Liberty is a mashup of the Statue of Liberty and the giant reclining Buddha statues of Asia. The piece, coated in plaster resin, is sturdy enough to allow viewers to touch, climb, sit atop, lean up against the figure, and interact with the monument at a human level. Finished with copper paint and an oxidizing acid, the patina mimics the actual Statue of Liberty. 

Reclining Liberty is made possible in part with funding from: Friends of Morningside Park, LMCC, Marcus Garvey Park Alliance, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, New York State Council on the Arts, and Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation (UMEZ).

Image credit: courtesy of the artist

Jon Isherwood, Broadway Blooms
July 15, 2021 to April 19, 2022
Broadway Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Broadway Blooms is a series of eight marble sculptures installed at eight major intersections along Broadway starting at 64th Street (Dante Park/Lincoln Center), then 72nd, 79th, 96th, 103rd, 117th, 148th, and ending at 157th Street. The artist chose the floral forms for their universality and accessibility. Carved from seven different types of marble, their ephemerality is contrasted against the durability of the hard stone.

This exhibition is presented by the Broadway Mall Association and Morrison Gallery.

Image credit: Raul de Nieves, And the night mare rides on, image courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, The Musical Brain
April 30, 2021 to March 30, 2022
Multiple Locations
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The Musical Brain is a group exhibition that reflects on the power music has to bring us together. The exhibition is named after a short story by the Argentine contemporary writer CÃ?©sar Aira, and explores the ways that artists use music as a tool to inhabit and understand the world. The featured artists approach music through different lenses—historical, political, performative, and playful—to create new installations and soundscapes installed throughout the park. This exhibition includes works by Rebecca Belmore and Osvaldo Yero, Vivian Caccuri, Raul de Nieves, Guillermo Galindo, David Horvitz, Mai-Thu Perret, Naama Tsabar, and Antonio Vega Macotela. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Ibrahim Mahama, 57 Forms of Liberty
April 30, 2021 to March 30, 2022
16th Street The High Line
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For the High Line, Ibrahim Mahama presents 57 Forms of Liberty, an inverted industrial tank from a defunct manufacturing facility in Wilmington, North Carolina. The work is inspired by a rusted smokestack the artist saw at the locomotive workshop in Sekondi, Ghana that now has a tree growing from its mouth. For Mahama, the workshop is an important reference to the British use of railways to divide and exploit resources until the country regained its independence in 1959. While the British railways, a former industrial tank from North Carolina, and the High Line have very different industrial histories, Mahama notes that it’s often when we zoom out, and remove ourselves from a specific space and time, that we can come to see our shared history all the better. The sculpture on the High Line also has a tree growing from its top, an important image for the artist that mirrors the torch of the Statue of Liberty to the south, and the non-human agents that continue to reinvent the conditions for living on this planet, even among the structures built and abandoned by humans. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Hannah Levy, Retainer
April 30, 2022 to March 30, 2022
23rd Street
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For the High Line, Hannah Levy makes an oversized orthodontic retainer from carved marble and stainless steel. The piece points to the strangeness of orthodontics and straight teeth as a marker of class, in part because of orthodontics’ exorbitant price. The organic form of the cast mouth contrasts with its smooth metal bars, which conjures the feeling of the rigid form inside one’s mouth and invites external structures inside one’s own body. Levy’s giant retainer is almost as tall as the park benches nearby, and the retainer wire is the size of the High Line’s exterior railings, which sets the piece in conversation with the architecture and design of the park and its surroundings. 

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Image credit: Photo courtesy of worthless studios

Behin-Ha Design Studio, Be Heard
May 15, 2021 to March 18, 2022
Thomas Paine Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Be Heard is a large-scale megaphone made of plywood panels arranged to create the conical form of the megaphone and assembled to create the structural framework that holds it up. The plywood was previously used as a barrier, providing security to businesses from the perceived threat of the protests on one side, and a canvas for expression to street artists and protesters on the other. By transforming the plywood to a megaphone, a device for amplifying people's voices, the project builds on these layers of use and meaning. It aims to elicit a hopeful and optimistic reaction, highlighting the resilience of New York City by showcasing how a material once used as a barrier during protests can be transformed to celebrate free speech and civic engagement.

The Plywood Protection Project is an initiative to collect the plywood used by NYC businesses to board up their windows during the protests of 2020 and redistribute it to artists, extending and repurposing the life of this material. Arts not-for-profit worthless studios collected over 200 boards of plywood and initiated an open call for artists, eventually selecting five local makers to participate in a unifying public art project across all five boroughs of New York. This piece is one of the five created by the project, each installed in a different borough of New York City.

This exhibition is presented by worthless studios.

Image credit: Photo by Casey Kelbaugh, courtesy of The Armory Show

Untitled (AFH Installation), David Cavaliero and Niyi Olagunju
September 9, 2021 to December 3, 2021
Bella Abzug Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
A collaborative project between New York-based artist David Cavaliero and Houston-based artist Niyi Olagunju, this interactive installation invites the public to identify themselves and question their passive complicity in the dysfunctional ecosystem of global trade. Ubiquitous in international commerce, shipping pallets are arranged in a grid to reference geographical coordinates and the place of the African continent within this economic structure. When engaged with the installation, viewers are forced to confront their own image and position in this global system.

This exhibition is presented by TAFETA (London) in partnership with the Hudson Yards Hell’s Kitchen Alliance for Armory Off-Site.

Photo courtesy of the artist

Joanne Howard, The Elders
April 18, 2021 to November 30, 2021
Carl Schurz Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Joanne Howard’s public art installation The Elders is comprised of small brass sculptures cast from carved apples. Howard carves faces into apples before letting them sit for a period of time. As the apples dehydrate, their faces take on the role of wizened elders. Howard sees these miniature characters as guardians of nature, here to protect the natural environment and also to gently remind passersby of the preciousness and precarious state of our green spaces. The artworks can be found on the fences near the park entrance at East 86th Street and East End Avenue and the Hoop Garden.

Image credit: Courtesy of Photoville

Various Artists, FACES OF HARLEM
August 7, 2021 to November 30, 2021
Holcombe Rucker Park, Jackie Robinson Park, Marcus Garvey Park, Morningside Park, Manhattan, Manhattan

Description:

FACES OF HARLEM is a multi-site outdoor photography installation curated by founder Sade Boyewa El and Kate Sterlin, featuring portraits of friends and neighbors in Harlem; a documentation of who we are today, 100 years after the Harlem Renaissance. In early 2021 Sade Boyewa El, a longtime Harlemite invited nine other photographers to create portraits of people from this beloved neighborhood in hopes of inspiring meaningful conversations, fostering connection, and bridging some of the many visible gaps in the community.

Image credit: Melvin Edwards,

Melvin Edwards, Brighter Days
May 4, 2021 to November 28, 2021
City Hall Park, Manhattan
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Description:

For over 50 years, Melvin Edwards has created public art for communities all around the world. His work reimagines monumental civic sculpture by uniting abstract forms with personal symbols to address issues of race, labor, and the African Diaspora. Brighter Days is a focused look at Edwards’ career through five sculptures from 1970 to 1996, and a sixth large-scale work commissioned in 2020. Each one incorporates some form of chain.

The context of City Hall Park adds resonance to the historical associations of these metal forms as tools of slavery and violence. This is the site of the African Burial Ground, a colonial-era cemetery for enslaved and freed individuals of African descent. More recently it became a geographic center of Black Lives Matter protests with the occupation of City Hall. Brighter Days, a title chosen by the artist, affirms his optimistic view of our shared future. Tracing the long arc of Edwards’ career, these six sculptures encourage us to remain mindful of the past as we cherish the social linkages that are more important than ever.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Photo credit: Photo by Andy Romer, Courtesy of Madison Square Park Conservancy

Maya Lin, Ghost Forest
May 10, 2021 to November 14, 2021
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Maya Lin’s Ghost Forest, a towering stand of forty-nine haunting Atlantic white cedar trees, is a newly-commissioned public art work. Lin brings her vision as an artist and her agency as an environmental activist to this project, a memory of germination, vegetation, and abundance and a harsh symbol of the devastation of climate change. The height of each tree, around forty feet, overwhelms human scale and stands as a metaphor of the outsized impact of a looming environmental calamity.

This exhibition is presented by the Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Image credit: Courtesy of NYC Parks/Adrian Sas

Chris Carnabuci, FLOYD, JOHN LEWIS, BREONNA
September 30, 2021 to October 30, 2021
Union Square Park, Manhattan
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Description:

This exhibition is part of Confront Art’s SEEINJUSTICE series and features three sculptures by Chris Carnabuci: "FLOYD," "BREONNA," and "JOHN LEWIS." The SEEINJUSTICE series is inspired by the events of 2020 and has empowered many to take a stand in demanding justice, as Congressman John Lewis once did. The series aims to honor the lives and ongoing messages through art, tying together three iconic people. The sculptures stand at 10-feet tall, composed of layers of precision-cut wood to craft a detailed and realistic monument of each subject.

This exhibition is presented by Confront Art and Union Square Partnership.

Image credit: Image courtesy of Adrian Sas.

Adrian Sas, Source to Spout
June 18, 2021 to October 29, 2021
Riverside Park, Manhattan
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Description:

"Source to Spout" features a series of photographs of the reservoirs and watersheds which supply NYC's drinking water, wrapped around ten drinking fountains in Riverside Park from 64th Street to 174th. In the context of an impending global water crisis, the public installation seeks to bring awareness to the issue by asking people locally to consider where their water comes from, and to reconsider using single use plastic bottles, especially when water fountains offer free refills. At the same time, Source to Spout leverages the visual, nonverbal power of photography to communicate and delight.

Source to Spout is made possible in part with public funds from Creative Engagement, supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts and administered by LMCC. More information, including the locations of the fountains and photographs, can be found here.

Queens

Image caption: Image courtesy BODYARMOR

MAST, Tennis Is a Game
August 26, 2021 to August 25, 2022
Detective Keith L Williams Park, Queens
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Description:

In 2021, BODYARMOR Sports Drink and Naomi Osaka kicked off a court renovation initiative designed to revitalize tennis courts she grew up playing on, enriching the community, inspiring youth sports organizations through art, and ultimately reminding everyone to play to have fun, because after all, tennis is a game.

This exhibition is presented by BODYARMOR.

Photo credit: courtesy of Richard West

Afro Pick: Remembering & Moving Forward, Yvonne Shortt with Mayuko Fujino+ Joel Esquite + Queens Community
July 12, 2021 to July 11, 2022
MacDonald Park, Queens
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Description:

The piece is a way to honor those who have died during COVID. It’s also a way to celebrate the community moving forward to make a better world for our youth by taking what we as a community have learned and working together for change.

The Afro pick originated over 5500 years ago in Africa as a way to honor, celebrate, educate, and empower.

Funded by RPGA Studio, Council member Koslowitz, and ConEd

Photo: courtesy of Richard West

Yvonne Shortt with Mayuko Fujino, Joel Esquite, Anna Sedova, Elizabeth Barksdale, Peppermint
June 12, 2021 to June 11, 2022
Forest Park, Queens
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Description:

A whimsical take on the ever-present New York Poop pickup predicament. Made of porcelain, metal, and acrylic, this mixed media installation reminds dog owners to clean up after their four-legged friends. This work is inspired by artist Yvonne Shortt and her adventures in Forest Park’s dog run with her Airedale terrier Peppermint.

This exhibition is presented by RPGA Studio, Inc.

Image credit: Photo courtesy of worthless studios

Tanda Francis, RockIt Black
May 15, 2021 to April 18, 2022
Queensbridge Park, Queens
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Description:

RockIt Black is a continuation of sculptor Tanda Francis’ work, dedicated to undoing the stigmatization of Blackness by presenting Black identities as divine and the foundation of our shared humanity. The aim of RockIt Black is to open up the public’s consciousness to the divine feminine energy for the purpose of balance and healing. Mami Wata, Oshun, an African Goddess by the East River is the inspiration. She is a cleansing spirit for this world on fire. Rockit Black’s polished mirror ornament is inspired by Oshun’s mirror and its shape and surface is made to suggest a nestled and a portal to another dimension. The mirrored surface faces the tree-filtered rising sun and faces the neighboring Queensbridge Houses.

The Plywood Protection Project is an initiative to collect the plywood used by NYC businesses to board up their windows during the protests of 2020 and redistribute it to artists, extending and repurposing the life of this material. Arts not-for-profit worthless studios collected over 200 boards of plywood and initiated an open call for artists, eventually selecting five local makers to participate in a unifying public art project across all five boroughs of New York. This piece is one of the five created by the project, each installed in a different borough of New York City.

This exhibition is presented by worthless studios.

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

Judith Modrak, Endangered Fossils
August 6, 2021 to April 10, 2022
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
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Description:

Endangered Fossils”represent an imagined archaeological excavation of New York State’s large fossil record. The sculptures are inspired by the trilobites, brachiopods and crinoids who flourished during the Devonian period, ~400 million years ago. These crab, clam, and starfish like organisms lived in marine environments very similar to the coral reefs of today. The project ponders the origin of the ecosystem we inhabit and our role, relationship, and responsibility to that environment in light of cataclysmic climate change and global pandemics.

Image credit: Courtesy of NYC Parks

Jeff Kasper, soft spots
August 31, 2021 to March 18, 2022
Rockaway Beach and Boardwalk, Queens
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Description:

Soft Spots, is a mindfulness path that takes inspiration from the playful style of self-help and mutual aid graphics that gained popularity on social media during the pandemic. Subverting the language of "social distance" signage, Soft Spots, is designed for taking a moment to contemplate seeking support when you feel unsafe.

This exhibition is presented by ArtBridge, and Facebook Open Arts.

Image: River Whittle; â??LENAPEHOKING / LAND BACKâ??; Image by Scott Lynch

River Whittle, LENAPEHOKING / LAND BACK 2021
September 29, 2021 to March 6, 2022
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
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Description:

River Whittle renders the cityscape of what we now call Manhattan in deep blue and the stippled effect of half-tone newsprint. In bright red gothic-style script, the word “Lenapehoking,” the true name for the homeland of the Lenape People, is cut out of the city. The Lenape, the original inhabitants of this land, are also known as the Delaware, a name brought by European settler colonists, and who lived in the area surrounding the Delaware River and Hudson Valley River Sheds, including parts of present-day Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The second part of the title references the campaign to return governing power, as well as physical land, back to Indigenous people in their ancestral territories, which globally have been misappropriated and degraded by white colonizers.

The image’s starkness, the outmoded printing technique, and Gothic script evince the traumatic past of the Lenape diaspora—systematic genocide, forced relocation, and centuries of oppression. The landmass spotted by Europeans upon arrival, now tower-filled Lower Manhattan, is hazy and suggests the difficulty of seeing the past horrors revealed in the present. The amalgamation of time and land markers with the demand for “land back” highlights the artist’s insistence that collective healing, land reparations, and historical reckoning are all deeply imbricated. 

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Image: Yvonne Shortt, Jenna Boldebuck, & Kelly Li; â??African American Marbleization- An Act of Civil Disobedience: Hair Sanctuaryâ?? 2021; Image by Scott Lynch

Various Artists, Sanctuary: The 2021 Socrates Annual
October 2, 2021 to March 6, 2022
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
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Description:

Since its inception in 1986, Socrates Sculpture Park has been a sanctuary for artists and the public. Applicants to the 2021 open call were asked to submit proposals that addressed the many meanings of sanctuary – as spaces of rest and protection; as sacred sites; and as supportive environments. Most crucially, artists were asked: how can art function as a sanctuary, a place of refuge, rest and meditation – without resorting to escapism?

The eleven projects selected represent a range of interpretations, drawing from diverse communities, traditions, and artistic strategies to create unique sculptures and installations. Several threads emerge throughout the exhibition, including practices of self-care, the spiritual elements of natural phenomena, and meditations on the conditions that necessitate sanctuary. Some projects provide space for mourning modes of oppression and acknowledge that sanctuaries are not always spaces free from fear.

For many of the artists, sanctuary is not necessarily a fixed geographical location, but a time-bound space that is created and recreated against the backdrop of threats such as illness, climate change, the collapse of the social service systems, and violence of racism and colonialism. Sound – both musical and spoken words – situate and unite communities of sanctuary in many of these works, a visceral mode of communicating refuge. This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Image credit: Image courtesy of Pictures for Elmhurst

Various Artists, Art Is Healing
September 22, 2021 to November 22, 2021
Frank D. O'Connor Playground, Queens
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Description:

Art is Healing celebrates the staff at NYC Health + Hospitals/Elmhurst, who continue to fight COVID-19, and the community of artists who came together to support the hospital at the height of the pandemic. Pictures For Elmhurst collaborated with the photographer Camila Falquez to create 31 original portraits to share the faces of those behind the hospital’s immeasurable dedication to its community through these challenging times. Falquez’s new portraits sit alongside 33 photographs from the original April 2020 Pictures For Elmhurst fundraiser to illustrate how intimately art and health are intertwined – how art can be healing. 

This project is presented by Pictures for Elmhurst.

Staten Island

Musa Hixson, Healing Arch
June 21, 2022 to June 17, 2022
Tompkinsville Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Healing Arch is an 8 ½ foot tall stainless steel sculpture that is inspired by a photo of Eric Garner. The artwork prompts others to stand in the shoes of the humanity of someone like Garner, to experience human love, imagining a hug, or standing in meditation as you take in a view of the surroundings. It gives us an opportunity for pause and reflection. Healing Arch is the result of a long community driven selection process managed by The Friends of Tompkinsville Park to find an artist who could create a symbol to launch their Peace Justice & Healing Community Campaign.

This exhibition is presented by The Friends of Tompkinsville Park.

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