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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Current Exhibits

Bronx

Art Students League, ...and We Breath
September 15, 2016 to September 15, 2017
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with NYC Parks that has culminated in the installation of the collaborative sculpture, …and We Breathe, at Van Cortlandt Park. This is the sixth year for the M2M program, which has installed nearly 50 monumental works in NYC parks since 2011. This piece by all seven M2M sculptors celebrates and explores the various aspects of “Air,” this year’s theme for Van Cortlandt Park. This installation was created by artists Aaron Bell, Sheila Berger, James Mikhel Emerson, Tanda Francis, Markus Rudolph Holtby, Shiho Sato, and Sarah Thompson Moore. The group also has works concurrently on view in Riverside South Park in Manhattan.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program.

Diana Perea, Bronx Tracks
July 2016 to July 2017
Railroad Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Created by Bronx artist Diana Perea, the Bronx Tracks was inspired by French muralist Nelio as well as the unique sounds, movement and cityscape of the Bronx. The mural is a site-specific installation designed to activate the park and to create a more pedestrian-friendly experience along E. 161st Street between the bustling courthouse center at Morris Avenue and the less trafficked three-block stretch to Elton Avenue. A team of young DreamYard artists and an intergenerational team of community volunteers installed the mural, spurring conversation, creativity, and a new favorite destination among community members and groups.

The mural’s abstract forms and vibrant colors reenergize Railroad Park, the adjacent NYCHA Morrisania Air Rights building, and the path to the often-overlooked Metro North Station directly behind it. Perea’s innovative techniques emphasize the beauty of the existing structures, and the mural’s influences by Picasso, Delaunay, Kandinsky, and Malevich can be admired by all who play in and pass by Railroad Park and E. 161st Street.

This exhibit is presented by WHEDco and The DreamYard Project in partnership with the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA).

Brooklyn

Image courtesy of Public Art Fund

Anish Kapoor, Descension
May 3, 2017 to September 10, 2017
Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

As part of its 40th Anniversary season, Public Art Fund brings Descension, one of Anish Kapoor’s most viscerally arresting installations, to New York City for the first time. Sited at Pier 1 in Brooklyn Bridge Park, this massive, continuously spiraling funnel of water will harness one of the most evanescent of materials and create a striking contrast with the adjacent East River. Kapoor, among the most influential artists of his generation, has had a career-long engagement with space and the limits of perception. With Descension, he has created a dynamic negative space that descends into the ground, disturbing the familiar boundaries of our world. In the midst of a quintessential New York park, Kapoor invites us to experience the sheer perceptual wonder of an ordinary material like water made to behave in an extraordinary way.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Photo credit Jacob Farber

Jacob Farber, Rene
August 22, 2016 to August 13, 2017
Valentino Pier, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

René is comprised of scrap wood found in nearby Gowanus, Brooklyn. The sculpture speaks to the community members and organizations that are being forgotten as neighborhoods develop. This work enhances the conversations related to sustainability and usefulness as they apply to Brooklyn, but also other communities where residents, businesses, and artists have been forced out by neighborhood change. Farber hopes that this work will serve as a reminder that communities can come together and find a sustainable way in which to move forward. The name of the sculpture relates to the theme of again finding a voice, being found, and–through cooperation and collaboration–being reborn

Carole Eisner, Monumental Sculptures at Prospect Park
May 2016 to May 2017
Prospect Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For more than 45 years Eisner has been welding massive abstract sculptures from scrap and recycled metal. The four works that will be on view in Prospect Park are from a series Eisner created in the past 10 years from I–beams, rolled and twisted to create lyrical, elegant forms. This yearlong exhibition utilizes four key sites throughout the Park, chosen to maximize visitor access. The grassy triangle entrance facing Grand Army Plaza is home to Dancer, a 17–foot tall sculpture which spirals and soars upwards. Zerques, one of the smaller sculptures standing six and half feet tall will be placed on the lawn in front of the historic Litchfield Villa on 5th Street. Skipper, rising 13 feet and also constructed with curved I–beams, will greet visitors entering the Park from Bartel–Pritchard Square. Valentine II, named for its elegant heart shaped form, will be placed on the Peninsula in front of the Lake.

This exhibition is presented by Susan Eley Fine Art and the Prospect Park Alliance.

Manhattan

Rendering Courtesy of the artist, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo, and Friends of the High Line. ©Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor, the floaters
March 17, 2017 to March 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Henry Taylor is a painter known for his intimate depictions of people, capturing a wide range of subjects that span from his close friends and family, to strangers whose appearances strike him, to celebrities within the African American community. His color–blocked compositions evoke compassion and a sense of shared space, setting the viewer in close conversation with those pictured.

For the High Line, Taylor presents a new version of a self-portrait adapted specifically for its setting on the side of a building at West 22nd Street. The work depicts the artist and a friend “blissed out,” relaxing in a swimming pool at a friend’s house in Palm Springs. Reminiscent of David Hockney’s paintings of Los Angeles swimming pools from the 1960s, the floaters, a title which references the eponymous Detroit R&B group, portrays the artist in a moment of pure, leisurely happiness.

This exhibition is presented by High Line Art.

Dora Budor, The Forecast (New York Situation), 2017. Part of Mutations, a High Line Commission. On view April 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Mutations
April 20, 2017 to March 31, 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Mutations is an open-air group exhibition that explores the relationship between man and nature, looking at how the boundaries between the natural world and culture are defined, crossed, and obliterated. The exhibition is inspired by the High Line as a controlled environment that encapsulates, on the one hand, the modern dream of humans taming nature, and on the other, the promise of nature reclaiming its control.

Artists who are part of this exhibition include Larry Bamburg, Alisa Baremboym, Sascha Bruanig, Dora Budor, Radamés Juni Figueroa, Guan Xiao, Marguerite Humeau, Veit Laurent Kurz, Joanna Malinowska, Jumana Manna, Jon Rafman, and Max Hooper Schneider.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Photo by Toby Tenenbaum, courtesy of Randallâ??s Island Parks Alliance

Rose DeSiano, Island of Empirical Data and Other Fabrications, FLOW.17
May 6, 2017 to November 30, 2017
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Rose DeSiano’s Island of Empirical Data and Other Fabrications uses historical records, statistical data, photo archives and government documents - data points portraying a web of American values and struggles - to explore the complexity and reflexivity of culturally-constructed histories. Focusing on Randall’s Island Park as a microcosm of urban planning and transformation, DeSiano will photograph buildings, sites, and landmarks representing this data, mining the city’s archives to fill in gaps.

Welcoming park visitors at the touchdowns of crossings from East Harlem and the South Bronx, each series will comprise a multi-paneled, oversized photographic predella, visualizing the Island’s historical and socioeconomic data. The predella structure will reference Northern Renaissance altarpieces, elaborately-painted panels using Biblical characters to display challenges facing kingdoms. DeSiano’s panels will loom over Park visitors, extending the periphery and enveloping them within the city’s history of challenges and triumphs; at the same time, their own images will be reflected and superimposed upon the scene, in turn updating the archival images within modern-day Randall’s Island Park.

FLOW.17 is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance and The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

Joy Brown, Joy Brown on Broadway
May 17, 2017 to November 17, 2017
Broadway Malls from 72nd Street to 166th Street
Broadway Malls, Manhattan
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Description:

The Broadway Mall Association celebrates its 30th anniversary with Joy Brown on Broadway, a sculpture exhibition of nine bronze works on the green malls at the center of Broadway from 72nd Street to 166th Street. The exhibition is the 10th sculpture show that the Broadway Mall Association has presented on the malls since 2005. Brown’s rounded forms and use of bronze convey the heavy gravity of stone. The playful expressions and gestures of her figures transcend that weight, suggesting warmth and lightness of being. Simplicity of form and earth-toned patina evoke a feeling of stillness and peace. The influence of the Japanese aesthetic on Brown’s sculpture springs from her childhood in Japan and apprenticeship in traditional Japanese ceramics.

This exhibition is presented by Broadway Mall Association and Morrison Gallery.

KAWS, New York Made: Stanton Street Courts, photo courtesy of Nike

KAWS, New York Made: Stanton Street Courts
November 17, 2016 to November 16, 2017
Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Manhattan
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Description:

New York Made: Stanton Street Courts by KAWS encompass two side-by-side full basketball courts (approximately 116 by 80 feet), as well as four hoops. “My approach to the courts was very similar to how I would work on canvas. I wanted to create something that was true to my language, but also considerate of this being a court that people are playing on,” the Brooklyn–based, world–renowned artist Brian Donnelly (KAWS) explains. “I wanted to find the sweet spot where it works visually and functionally – how its broken up by the game’s lines and works with my images. It will have an intimate effect on the players that use the court.”

KAWS first moved to Manhattan in 1996, and lived on the corner of Clinton and Stanton Street. His familiarity with the park and its neighborhood is thus extremely personal.

This exhibition is presented with Nike.

William Logan, Flame
May 15, 2017 to November 15, 2017
Tramway Plaza, Manhattan
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Description:

With a background in architecture and design, William Logan has focused on large scale public sculpture for the past 15 years. Drawing and model-making have been constant endeavors while his experience in engineering and boat-building has given him an intuitive feel for structure. Flame is the result of experimental work with carbon fiber and lightweight structures. The intricate surface texture reflects the laborious effort that went into the fabrication of the piece by hand and allows the piece to catch the light in unexpected ways. The open lattice of the upper element lends the work a diaphanous quality, while its construction in aluminum gives it structure.

Amanda Long, Wishing Well, photo courtesy of the artist

Amanda Long, Wishing Well
October 29, 2016 to October 3, 2017
Dyckman Farmhouse Museum, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Wishing Well, a playful, site-specific, interactive sculpture, is an updated, technological interpretation of a fairy tale wishing well, a popular theme in European folklore. Wishing wells were believed to grant requests by way of magical waters or deities residing within. Visitors of all ages are encouraged to speak a wish into the well. The words are translated into a video ripple inside, and an echo repeats the words back. Turning the well’s crank activates video and microphone recordings, which are captured in a database inside the sculpture. The recordings will be curated and presented on a dedicated website, wishingwellnyc.org, bringing the artwork beyond the physical space of the park.

The Dyckman Farmhouse, a Dutch Colonial style farmhouse built c. 1784, was opened as a museum in 1916. Today it is nestled in a small garden and is an extraordinary reminder of early Manhattan and important part of the diverse Inwood neighborhood. The original well has long been absent from the house, although a replacement well-head was constructed around 1915-1916 during the restoration of the farmhouse. This well-head was removed sometime in the 1980’s and replaced by a simple wood platform. Installed at the site of the original well on the Dyckman property, Long’s video sculpture enlivens the vacant well site as a fantasy restoration.

This exhibition is presented by the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and the Historic House Trust, with support from the New York State Council on the Arts.

Liz Glynn, Open House
March 1, 2017 to September 24, 2017
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Open House transforms Doris C. Freedman Plaza into an open air ballroom where only scattered furniture and arches remain eight blocks south from the original mansion. It references one of the grandest Fifth Avenue interiors designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White: the now–demolished William C. Whitney Ballroom.Glynn’s lavish Louis XIV sofas, chairs, and footstools evoke the historic home, but with a twist–these objects feature sculpted additions and are cast in concrete, a populist material more commonly seen in modern architecture. With this revision, the artist invites the public to enjoy a previously exclusive interior space that is now open and accessible to all.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Phyllis Hammond, Beyond the Edge
October 15, 2016 to August 25, 2017
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
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Description:

Hamptons-based artist Phyllis Hammond has created five new sculptures for Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, entitled Tempo, Alien, Flying, Gateway, and Sign of Freedom. Exhibited together under the title Beyond the Edge, the steel and aluminum sculptures feature narrow stem-like bases topped by whimsical, kinetic elements that rotate in the wind. Hammond uses an improvisational method to create her colorful, large-scale sculptures. The metal cutouts are based on playful, looping doodles on paper that she scans and modifies using a computer program. Once the drawings have been refined digitally, the designs are cut from sheets of metal using a water jet machine. After the metal shapes are hammered, bent and welded into curved shapes, they are powder-coated with brightly colored paint.

Courtesy of the artist

Yasumitsu Morito, Spirit of New York City
October 25, 2016 to August 25, 2017
Carl Schurz Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Japanese artist Yasumitsu Morito designed Spirit of New York City to harmonize with the setting of Carl Schurz Park. The work sits just above the Hoop Garden, surrounded by trees lining the pathway to the promenade along the East River. Yasumitsu’s work addresses the human form within space, what it is to be human, and how the human spirit responds to social, political, and religious circumstances. For this installation, he considered both the practical and aesthetic experiences of the viewer. The sculpture conveys a sense of spiritual presence and prompts park visitors to contemplate the past, present, and future of sculpture in tandem with that of the park. Sitting on a vessel symbolizing the melting pot, the human figure represents a moment of serene contemplation amidst the commotion of the city.

Martin Ramone Delossantos, Little Oil Well
October 5, 2016 to August 6, 2017
Ahearn Park, Manhattan
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Description:

This work by Hoboken–based artist Martin Ramone Delossantos is an abstraction of an oil well. Consisting of a four–part lower portion made of thick steel tubes, the sculpture is topped by two bicycle wheels that give it a kinetic quality. Delossantos is a sculptor, painter, and artisan who creates whimsical sculptures out of metal and found metal objects that interact with space. His sculptures represent rhythm, feelings, and emotions. The artist hopes that this work will bring attention to the vibrant arts community in his hometown of Hoboken across the Hudson River. This is only the second exhibit ever placed in Ahearn Park, on New York’s Lower East Side.

Bjorn Skaarup, Hippo Ballerina
February 7, 2017 to July 31, 2017
Dante Park, Manhattan
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Description:

“Hippo Ballerina,” a copper tutu-clad bronze sculpture standing over 15 feet tall, by Danish artist Bjørn Skaarup plants her sizable slippered feet across from Lincoln Center. Inspired by Degas’ “Little Dancer Aged Fourteen” and the dancing hippos of Walt Disney’s “Fantasia,” “Hippo Ballerina” vividly illustrates the artist’s ability to reinterpret subjects and themes found in ancient myths, art history, modern animation, and contemporary popular culture in playful ways that engage the viewer. This is Skaarup’s first US public art installation.

This exhibition is presented by Cavalier Galleries.

Lluis Lleo, Morpho's Nest in the Cadmium House
May 1, 2017 to July 31, 2017
Park Avenue Malls from 52nd Street to 56th Street
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
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Description:

Morpho’s Nest in the Cadmium House is a site-specific installation of five double-sided paintings on carved Catalonian sandstone by New York-based Spanish artist Lluis Lleó. The 13-foot, 7,000-pound paintings are Lleó’s first public art exhibition in New York.

For Lleó, the paintings are an encounter between tradition and modernity, a merger of Catalan Romanesque frescoes and the work of modern American masters such as Mark Rothko, Ellsworth Kelly, and Agnes Martin. With poetic finesse, Lleó carves into the thick and dense sandstone, which he combines with ancestral fresco painting to create a tension between color and form. The title of the work references the morpho butterfly, a beautiful and fragile species found in Mexico and Central and South America.

This exhibition is presented with the Fund for Park Avenue.

Photo credit Liz Gwinn

Kevin Beasley, Who's Afraid to Listen to Red, Black and GreenΑ
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
Morningside Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Kevin Beasley is a New York-based artist interested in materials, sculpture, sound, and social exchange. Each of these three sculptures features a color of the Pan-African flag and consists of a mixture of resin, clothing, and housedresses sourced from a dress shop in East Harlem. Beasley calls the sculptures “acoustic mirrors,” and invites visitors to listen carefully as one speaks, sings, or otherwise projects sound into them.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Photo credit Liz Gwinn

Simone Leigh, A particularly elaborate imba yokubikira, or kitchen house, stands locked up while its owners live in diaspora
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Simone Leigh is a Brooklyn-based artist with a longstanding interest in African and African-American material culture and women’s work. These three round, clay-and-thatch hybrid sculptures, called imbas, resemble kitchen houses from rural areas of Zimbabwe and were created in collaboration with architect Maxwell Mutanda. They celebrate the expansiveness of the African diaspora, but also evoke the experience of living outside the place considered home.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Photo credit Alani Bass

Kori Newkirk, Sentra
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan
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Description:

A New York native now based in Los Angeles, Kori Newkirk is well known for creating multimedia works, often using materials associated with urban black life. Reminiscent of the artist’s signature beaded curtains, this work reframes the steps rising from St. Nicholas Avenue, and invites park visitors to reimagine an ordinary walk as a ceremonial procession.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Photo credit Liz Gwinn

Rudy Shepherd, Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
Jackie Robinson Park, Manhattan
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Description:

A longtime resident of Upper Manhattan, Rudy Shepherd creates sculptures and performances intended to dispel people’s feelings of prejudice, violence, or disdain. Created from colored concrete, this work is a playful form with a very serious purpose—to open hearts and inspire positive energy, dialogue, and compassion.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Kenny Scharf, TotemOh
June 22, 2016 to June 21, 2017
116th street
East River Esplanade, Manhattan
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Description:

This vibrant mural by internationally renowned artist Kenny Scharf is installed along the waterfront at 116th Street on the East River Esplanade in Harlem. Painted on an idle brick column, the totem of colorful faces is designed in Scharf’s recognizable cartoon-inspired style. A banner spanning over 50 feet, NEVERENDINGOGO, is installed adjacent to the column and will be on view through September 30, 2016. This public artwork corresponds with an exhibition of the artist’s work at the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn Harbor, NY.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th Streets).

Aaron Schraeter, Birdhouse Repo
January 30, 2017 to June 6, 2017
First Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Birdhouse Repo reflects on the effects of a constantly growing population alongside income disparities in one of the world’s fastest moving cities. This oversized birdhouse, which is boarded up and placed under foreclosure, sits in the heart of a neighborhood that is one of the most historical and notable examples of New York City’s gentrification and the real estate bubble. Simply put, the city has become so expensive that even the birds cannot afford to live here. This work is Aaron Schaeter’s first public sculpture exhibition.

This exhibition is presented by First Street Green.

Queens

Courtesy of the artist

Jennifer Cecere, Double Doily
November 18, 2016 to November 17, 2017
PS1 Greenstreet (Jackson Avenue and 46th Avenue), Queens
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Description:

Jennifer Cecere’s artwork aims to integrate a feeling of domestic handiwork into the built environment. Doilies were invented by industrious women to hide and protect worn and frayed furnishings (maybe feelings too). Through the variety of materials that they can be made from, the ways in which they can be displayed, and their references to a variety of subject matter makes doilies very diverse. This double–sided, doily–shaped bench enlivens this small park in the midst of a busy thoroughfare and new construction by taking something intimate and domestic and placing it outdoors. The handicraft of the bench demonstrates a familiarity with domestic materials that ties us with our fragile environment and revives traditions that when integrated with art and architecture reflect our hopes and dreams.

Antonia A Perez, Light Spectrum
April 15, 2017 to August 6, 2017
Lewis H Latimer House, Queens
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Description:

Installed amidst a grove of trees adjacent to the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum, Light Spectrum draws the viewer’s attention to the science of light and color. Composed of discarded metal lampshade frames welded together in a totemic form, Perez’s sculpture is wrapped with crocheted plastic bags that turn the column into a filter for natural light infused with color. Her sculpture is an homage to the house’s former inhabitant, inventor Lewis Howard Latimer who played an integral role in patenting the light bulb and telephone.

This exhibition is presented by the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum, with support from the Queens Council on the Arts with public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Staten Island

Susan Stair, Tree Reflections
October 15, 2016 to October 14, 2017
Conference House Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Tree Reflections is a series of clay tiles cast from two Osage Orange trees combined with mosaic pieces that tells the story of two parks. The main components of this artwork are cast from an Osage Orange tree in Marcus Garvey Park near the artist’s home in Harlem. After visiting Conference House Park, Stair cast four clay extensions from the Osage Orange tree there, which were added to the existing artwork. Stair’s aims to create portraits of trees through her work. The clay that she presses onto living trees records their species, age, and strength. She was particularly attracted to the trees’ remarkable patterns, bending forms, and endurance, physical qualities that demonstrate the unique historical importance of this species.

An additional exhibition of Stair’s work in the Conference House Park Visitor Center’s Lenape Gallery will open on November 25 as part of Native American Heritage month.

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