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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Celebrating 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of our Art in the Parks program! Visit more than 50 public artworks currently on view in our parks, and celebrate with us at our upcoming anniversary events!

Celebrate 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Public Art Map and Guide

Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

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Current Exhibits

Citywide

Talking Statues
July 12, 2017 to June 30, 2018
Various Locations

Description:

Talking Statues brings together internationally acclaimed authors and actors to give voice to carefully selected statues worldwide. Started in Copenhagen, Denmark in 2013 by documentary filmmaker David Peter Fox, the project has since expanded to Helsinki, London, San Diego, Berlin, and Chicago. The New York installation of this project will feature 35 monuments throughout the city’s five boroughs that share stories via smartphones. Signs printed with QR codes will be posted near the participating statues, which will prompt the statue to “call” the visitor. The monuments will “speak” 18 different languages and represent more than 20 nations.

Participating statues can be found in Columbus Park, Continental Army Plaza and Steeplechase Park in Brooklyn; D’Auria-Murphy Triangle in the Bronx; The Battery, Bryant Park, Central Park, Kimlau Square, Riverside Park, Stuyvesant Square and Union Square Park in Manhattan; Athens Square, Columbus Square and Flushing Meadows Corona Park in Queens; and Tompkinsville Park in Staten Island. For a full list and map, please visit www.newyorktalkingstatues.com.

Bronx

LAMKAT in collaboration with Laura Alvarez, Untitled
November 5, 2017 to November 4, 2018
Mullaly Park, Bronx

Description:

Through the use of layering, pattern, geometry and the visual suggestion of movement, the collection of murals throughout Mullaly Bikepark strive to aesthetically represent the technical precision and skill necessary to accomplish tricks on and off the ramp. 

Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections.

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented by Mullaly Bikepark with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image Credit: LAMKAT in collaboration with Laura Alvarez, Untitled, Courtesy of the Artist

Courtesy of DreamYard

Matthew Westerby and Harold Simmons, Faces of Railroad Park
October 11, 2017 to October 10, 2018
Railroad Park, Bronx

Description:

Through "Faces of Railroad Park," DreamYard artists Harold Simmons and Matthew Westerby, along with David Flores, facilitated conversations with community members about healthy habits that people are already engaged with, discussion around how folks make use of parks and other public open spaces, and participants' thoughts on what they would like to see more of when it comes to their parks and public spaces. Interview subjects were also photographed, and these digital images were printed onto a vinyl material and then installed around the comfort station in Railroad Park. The artists will also release a podcast episode focusing on the project (and featuring interviews with participants). 

DreamYard programs develop artistic voice, nurture young peoples’ desire to make change and cultivate the skills necessary to reach positive goals. Young people in the Bronx need a continuous set of supports to help them towards positive outcomes as they navigate their educational pathway. Through offering sustained and meaningful supports, youth will develop the necessary tools to become creative and engaged citizens, life-long learners and the leaders and innovators of the 21st century.

Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections.

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lady K Fever, Birds Eye View; Soaring; Natural Elements
August 2017 to August 2018
Mosholu Playground, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Painted along the walls of this community playground, this installation consists of three murals by Lady K Fever. Birds Eye View offers a seasonal journey through the eyes of a soaring red–tailed hawk overlooking the park. Located on the park’s entrance ramp, Soaring transforms Bronx skies into a fantastical scene of hot air balloons, butterflies, dragonflies, moths, and ladybugs. Natural Elements presents a narrative of the seasonal life cycle of leaves as well as recognizable flora and fauna like the ruby–throated hummingbird and daylily, Bronx’s official flower.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of Mosholu Parkland.

Patricia Cazorla and Nancy Saleme, Flying High for Equality
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Joyce Kilmer Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inspired by American novelist Richard Bach’s bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Patricia Cazorla and Nancy Saleme use oversized, colorful sculptures of the city’s sparrows as a metaphor for the search for equality. Sparrows are creatures of resilience, audacity, intelligence, and beauty that mirror many of the qualities of New York City’s communities.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Lovie Pignata, Daylighting
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Virginia Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Lovie Pignata activates a blacktop with a bold, painted replica of the nearby Bronx River, highlighting the importance of this waterway. She has also installed retired canoes from local non-profits, which will be retrofitted with seating, chessboards, planters, and wayfinding signage.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Brooklyn

Image: Askew One, Artwork Inspired by The Last O.G. on TBS, NYC Parks

ASKEW ONE, Artwork Inspired by The Last O.G. on TBS
April 17, 2018 to April 16, 2019
Marcy Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
A newly refurbished basketball courts and an artistic mural at Marcy Playground include new asphalt, four new polycarbonate backboards, and a mural designed by artist ASKEW ONE, recognized worldwide for his unique approach to graffiti art. 

Image Credit: William Ellis, People of the Sun, Image courtesy of the Artist

William Ellis, The People of the Sun
December 12, 2017 to November 29, 2018
Lincoln Terrace / Arthur S. Somers Park, Brooklyn

Description:

The People of the Sun includes four metal sculptures along the pathway and entrances to the Lincoln Terrace Park. Each of these sculptures will function as rotating artistic billboards. Throughout the 2018 spring and summer seasons, The People of the Sun will cycle through new banners that feature themed artwork from local artists as well as celebrated members of the community. In an effort to foster holistically healthy lifestyles in the community, the monthly banners will also provide wellness instruction such as suggested exercises, stretches, healthy living tips.

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented by Friends of Brownsville Parks with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Photo Courtesy of BMS Family Health & Wellness Centers.

Building Mind, Body, and Spirit: BMS Art in the Park at Howard Playground
November 3, 2017 to November 2, 2018
Howard Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Twenty panels painted by Katya Joseph (K4Kreative), Chessica Rose, Jade Miranda (Jem Stone), Mathamatics Patterson, and Jazmine Hayes line Howard Playground’s fence. The works are part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections.

Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of BMS Family Health & Wellness Centers.

Image Credit: Fitzhugh Karol, Reaches, courtesy of the artist

Fitzhugh Karol, Searches and Reaches
November 15, 2017 to October 23, 2018
Prospect Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Located at Grand Army Plaza and Bartel Pritchard Square in Prospect Park, Fitzhugh Karol’s two sculptures of colorful intersecting steel shapes reference familiar silhouettes of stairs and hillsides. Their abstract and playful shapes invite interaction and are a reminder of man’s imprint on the landscape.

Image Credit: Fitzhugh Karol, Reaches, courtesy of the artist

Julia Sinelnikova, Triquerta for Healing, courtesy of the artist

Julia Sinelnikova, Triquerta for Healing
September 30, 2017 to September 29, 2018
Brower Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Triquerta for Healing is a sculpture that provides a sun-activated light bath to visitors of Brower Park. The artwork aims to bring neighborhood residents of all ages together to enjoy the surprising light effects from the sun. The shapes and color schemes that are present in the artwork represent healing and unity.

The Crown Heights Community Mediation Center provides anti-violence programs, youth programs and resource links to community residents. Its mission is to encourage communication and understanding, prevent future conflicts, and help foster stronger, healthier neighborhoods.

Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections.

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Deborah Kass, OY/YO
July 11, 2017 to July 10, 2018
North 5th Street Pier and Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Walking the line between respectful homage and brazen appropriation, Brooklyn-based artist Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of iconic 20th century, often with a feminist twist. OY/YO is sourced from urban and Brooklyn slang, the statement “I am” in Spanish, and the popular Yiddish expression. OY/YO has been a significant and reoccurring motif in Kass’ work since its first appearance in 2011, taking form in paintings, prints, and tabletop sculptures. In a provocative gesture, OY/YO, measuring 8 x 17 x 5 ft and painted bright yellow on aluminum along the Williamsburg waterfront, is visible from Manhattan’s skyscrapers including the Empire State Building.

This exhibition is presented by Paul Kasmin Gallery and Douglaston Development.

Blythe Cain, Circadia
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Circadia is an interactive luminescent sculpture and seating system made from concrete and glow-sand, which will act as a guide to the park entrance. Resembling a historic building foundation, Circadia also mimics the park’s rolling hills and natural rhythms found in nature.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Musa Hixson, The Conversation Sculpture
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Herbert Von King Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Musa Hixson’s steel sculpture includes several stools enclosed within a flower-shaped frame, which provide a space for intimate conversation in the public park. The sculpture’s horticultural form references the park’s mature landscape.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Image courtesy of Liz Sales

Jane Manus, Danielle
June 12, 2017 to June 11, 2018
Dr. Ronald McNair Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Jane Manus’ strongly geometric aluminum sculptures, personally welded by hand, draw their primary inspiration from the angularity and structure of architecture. With the play of its cheery, vibrant yellow paint and a dynamic use of negative space, Danielle transforms its surroundings and inspires an interactive viewing experience. The sculpture’s angular lines and joyful hue spring forth from the green lawns and trees surrounding it.

Image courtesy of the Fort Greene Park Conservancy

Amanda Patenaude, One Map of Many Moments
July 3, 2017 to May 25, 2018
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

One Map of Many Moments is an artist led, community generated project that transforms trash into inspiring public art by turning hundreds of broken glass shards collected from Fort Greene Park into a mosaic map of the park. Drawings from park visitors depicting everything from historic figures of Fort Greene to the current day activities and horticultural wonders of the grounds are sprinkled throughout the map. Each piece of the larger whole offers a contemplative view of our neighborhood’s waste and deep dedication to our park and highlights the role of community in preserving urban green spaces.

This exhibition is presented by the Fort Greene Park Conservancy.

Photo courtesy of the artist

Conrad Stojak, 4 Seasons of Lindens at the Linden Sitting Area
July 30, 2017 to April 30, 2018
Linden Sitting Area, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

4 Seasons of Lindens at the Linden Sitting Area consists of four decommissioned parking meters, each outfitted with a small diorama of linden trees throughout the seasons. The meters pay homage to the trees that this small park is named after. These works are part of an ongoing series of work, The Parking Meter Project, by artist Conrad Stojak. Stojak works with obsolete New York parking meters, many of which can be found out on the city streets and in warehouses, by upcycling them into public works of art. Each one is an individualistic, self-contained micro-world depicting New York City scenes in the form of urban dioramas that are community specific.

Manhattan

Image caption: Rendering of Sable Elyse Smith, C.R.E.A.M., 2018, courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Agora
April 19, 2018 to March 31, 2019
Multiple locations
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Agora is a group exhibition that looks at the role of art in defining, creating, and using public space. For centuries, artists have used public locations—and the public in general—as the heart of for their work. The exhibition looks at the power of art to change society, the role of art in public space, and whether art can be a form of protest. Artists working in public often take a political tone, mobilizing the public for social and political change, and for the possibility of realizing an alternate future. On the High Line—a public space and a natural platform—nine artists share their experiences inhabiting, speaking out of, and challenging the assumed boundaries of public space, where different voices can be heard, addressing important topics such as women’s rights, mass incarceration, the environment, and immigration.

Artists who are part of this exhibition include Maria Thereza Alves, Andrea Bowers, Mariechen Danz, Pope.L, Duane Linklater, Naufus Ramirez-Figueroa, Marinella Senatore, Timur Si-Qin, and Sable Elyse Smith.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Rendering of Dorothy Iannone, I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door, 2014. Courtesy the artist, Air de Paris, and Friends of the High Line.

Dorothy Iannone, I Left My Lamp Beside the Golden Door
March 5, 2018 to February 28, 2019
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Dorothy Iannone’s mural features three colorful Statues of Liberty. Between them runs the words, “I Lift My Lamp Beside the Golden Door,” which is the final line from Emma Lazarus’s poem “The New Colossus,” the ode to the freedom promised by immigration to America engraved on a bronze plaque mounted inside the statue at Liberty Island. Iannone’s piece was conceived before the recent months of upheaval in the United States around immigration, an already contested topic; these recent debates have raised the Statue of Liberty anew as a symbol of the openness of New York City and the United States to those seeking asylum, freedom, or simply a better life. Iannone’s vibrant Liberties bring a bit of joy to an often exhausting and demoralizing political debate.

This exhibition is presented by High Line Art.

Patricia Cazorla & Nancy Saleme, Once You Hear Me, You Won't Forget Me, Courtesy of the Artist

Patricia Cazorla & Nancy Saleme, Once You Hear Me, You Won't Forget Me
November 17, 2017 to November 16, 2018
Howard Bennett Playground, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Once You Hear Me, You Won't Forget Me is a colorful 30-foot landscape along the fence at Howard Bennett Playground. The installation depicts the imagined journey of a coqui, a small frog native to Puerto Rico known for its unique call, and his journey to New York. Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections. 

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented by El Museo del Barrio with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Image Credit: Patricia Cazorla & Nancy Saleme, Once You Hear Me, You Won't Forget Me, Courtesy of the Artist

Image caption: Courtesy of NYC Parks

Yinka Shonibare MBE, Wind Sculpture (SG) I
March 7, 2018 to October 14, 2018
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Created from fiberglass and covered with an intricate pattern, the 23-foot-tall Wind Sculpture (SG) I will rise above the plaza, reminiscent of the untethered sail of a ship billowing in the breeze. Its unique, hand-painted pattern in turquoise, red, and orange — colors that the artist associates with his childhood on the beaches of Lagos — is inspired by Dutch wax batik print, which Shonibare has called the “perfect metaphor for multilayered identities.” This is the first work in a second generation of his celebrated Wind Sculpture series and continues Shonibare’s ongoing examination of the construction of cultural identity through the lens of colonialism. The work creates an opportunity to reflect on social issues, including the movement of people and ideas across borders and the role of monuments in heterogeneous societies. 

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

NYC Parks/Daniel Avila

Dale Chihuly, Rose Crystal Tower
October 6, 2017 to October 5, 2018
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rose Crystal Tower stands 31-feet tall and is composed of Polyvitro crystals and steel. Polyvitro—an invention of Chihuly Studio—is the artist’s term for a plastic material which he casts into individual chunks which resemble glass, but are lighter and more resilient. Chihuly first used Polyvitro crystals in the composition “Crystal Mountain,” a 40-foot sculpture featured in the artist’s landmark exhibition, Chihuly in the Light of Jerusalem 2000.

Dale Chihuly is an American artist known for revolutionizing the Studio Glass movement and elevating the perception of the glass medium from the realm of craft to fine art. Over his 50-year career, the artist has become known for his iconic glass sculptures and ambitious architectural installations in historic cities, museums and gardens around the world.

Courtesy of Marcus Garvey Park Alliance

Jorge Luis Rodriguez, Atlas of the Third Millennium
November 10, 2017 to October 1, 2018
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Atlas of the Third Millennium represents the cross-section of stellar individuals who have called Harlem their home and those who continue to live, work and contribute to its cultural vibrancy. It is a "universe" of stars celebrating actors, writers, composers, musicians, painters, sculptors, educators, historians, activists, entrepreneurs, and community leaders. Atlas of the Third Millennium pays homage to and renews the resilience and endowment of all daughters and sons of Harlem.

This exhibition is presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance Public Art Initiative .

Image credit: Courtesy of Marcus Garvey Park Alliance

East Harlem at Play, Courtesy of the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance.

Giannina Gutierrez, Ralph Serrano, Jeremy Vega, East Harlem At Play
October 1, 2017 to September 30, 2018
White Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The White Park Art Wall is a collaborative effort by three local Latino artists: Giannina Gutierrez, Ralph Serrano and Jeremy Vega. Collectively, the three separate and distinct murals weave together a scene of sport, art and community, and embody the energy of the park and surrounding neighborhood. Pictured at center is basketball legend Cesar Fantauzzi, who is an East Harlem native. He is surrounded by colorful images of park and street scenes. 

East Harlem At Play is produced by the Public Art Initiative of the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance in collaboration with Friends of White Park, and Friends of Art Park Alliance. Funding for this project was made possible by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as part of an initiative to create health-inspired public art installations that encourage park use and strengthen community connections. 

This exhibition is part of Art in the Parks: Active Open Space presented with the Department for Health and Mental Hygiene, the Fund for Public Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

Bennett Lieberman, Color Columns
April 1, 2018 to August 24, 2018
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Interspersed among benches in the park, three “color columns” create fortuitous interactions among themselves, and harmonize with the grey, green, brown, and silver of the plaza. Associated texts inscribed on the colorful prism facets riff on the poetic and lucid state of mind produced by New York’s chill air, the joyous winter and spring festivals, and the epicyclic movement from one season into another. The prism facets are inspired by the luminous arrays of elegantly designed paint chips found in local hardware emporia and home furnishing mega-stores alike. When paired with their given names, these color groups present perfect opportunities to develop brief narratives or small poems that draw us deeper into the experience of color. The chromatic fields, especially in large format, add a physical dimension, like song lyrics, to the experience of language.

Courtesy of the artist

Samantha Holmes, Hell Gate Cairns
August 20, 2017 to August 11, 2018
Riverside Park South, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Hell Gate Cairns is a series of stacked stone pillars, or cairns, that stand watch over the western coastline of Riverside Park. By focusing on the forms of natural stone, the piece draws attention to the boulders that line the waterfront, remnants of the great earthmoving projects of the 20th century that cleared the city’s waterways, including the perilous “Hell Gate”. The monument’s placement at the water’s edge recalls these feats of human engineering, while further calling upon the cairns’ symbolism as an ancient sign of treacherous waters. Their verticality a reflection of the nearby skyline, the Hell Gate Cairns aim to embody the human impulse to imaginative construction – stacking stones first in play, then as architecture.

Image credit: Image courtesy of Hudson Square Connection

Various Artists, Hudson Square: Through Our Eyes
February 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018
Spring Street Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Consisting of photographs taken in the neighborhood around Spring Street Park, this exhibition features the work of students from Chelsea Career & Technical Education High School. Magic Box Productions teaching artist Jon Appel and visiting artist Martin Crook worked closely with the senior students as a photography, documentary team on this project. Magic Box Productions addresses the growing need for exemplary media arts education in New York City’s public K-12 schools, particularly those serving disadvantaged students with limited access to art and technology. The images capture the unique aspects of history, commerce, architecture and other features of the Hudson Square neighborhood. This set of six banners follows a series of ten previously displayed banners from the same program.

This exhibition is presented by Hudson Square Connection and Magic Box Productions.

Naomi Lawrence, Magnolia
June 21, 2017 to June 20, 2018
Anibal Aviles Playground, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Through her colorfully crocheted, intensively worked, and oversized flowers, Naomi Lawrence believes that small artistic gestures can lead people into a new imagination about their home environment. She uses ubiquitous chain-link fences to frame color and texture in surprising ways, creating interaction between fiber, color, fence, sidewalk, and passing pedestrians and validating under-recognized and unappreciated corners of neighborhoods. At Anibal Aviles Playground, she created a giant magnolia–a seasonal Parks flower–which was installed in June. A crocheted hibiscus tree to be installed on the fence of J.H.S. 054 Booker T. Washington across the street in September, following a series of community workshops to make the leaves.

Cheryl Wing-Zi Wong, Constellation
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Seward Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Constellation is an architectural sculpture, performance, and panel series that activates the underused plaza in Seward Park as a transformative community public space. The site-specific sculptural pavilion is composed of interlocked wooden modules that will be re-arranged and transformed seasonally in three different configurations over the course of the exhibition.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Capucine Bourcart, LINOUQ
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Thomas Jefferson Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

From 2008 to 2012, Capucine Bourcart walked every street in Manhattan, from State Street to 220th Street, taking photographic details of walls along her route. This collection of photographs is used to create a photo-assemblage made of 4,170 metal squares that hang from a chain link fence in a design inspired by those of Native Americans’, the island’s first inhabitants.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

RECLINING FIGURE (Buddhaâ??s Classic Pose) 2018, Installation in Seward Park, Hestor & Essex Streets, Lower East Side, NY, supported by the Foundation for Contemporary Arts Emergency Grant, Ann Gillen sculptor/Artists Rights Society(ARS) NY, photo Mark

Ann Gillen, RECLINING FIGURE (Buddhaâ??s Classic Pose)
February 9, 2018 to May 25, 2018
Seward Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
RECLINING FIGURE (Buddha’s Classic Pose) explores the theme of the reclining figure, a form that can be found in sculpture all over the world. The white and yellow painted sculpture is constructed in three overlapping units that represent the legs, torso, head and arm of an abstracted, lounging human form. The simplicity of the sculpture will make a restful addition to the park for the many who use it. The path of the sun allows for the daily drama of shadow and light to illuminate each tilted plane at different times. 

Leonard Ursachi, What a Wonderful World
June 26, 2017 to May 15, 2018
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Romanian artist Leonard Ursachi’s “What a Wonderful World” is a large, egg-shaped sculpture woven from branches, on which a world map has been sketched with pigmented cement. It has two recessed embrasures, each inset with a stainless steel mirror. The form and woven branches evoke nests, birth, history, and nature, while the map may be read as humanity’s trace. The title can be interpreted as ironic, cautionary, or celebratory, depending on the viewer’s perspective. Ursachi’s art often addresses the impact of people and their governments on the earth, in addition to examining the impact of borders on individuals and societies.

Installation view of Darren Bader, such are promises, 2016. On view January 21 – February 20, 2016 at Sadie Coles HQ, London. Courtesy of the artist and Sadie Coles HQ

Darren Bader, chess: relatives
May 6, 2017 to April 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Located on the High Line at 13th Street, New York-based artist Darren Bader’s chess: relatives consists of a large-scale chessboard designed by the artist. Visitors are invited to take part in chess games during open park hours in which they take the place of chess pieces, their positions determined by their familial relationships to others. In order to play, visitors bring a group of 32 people together, who will be “played” by two additional people. Visitors are encouraged to assemble teams with their own friends or family, or to branch out and recruit strangers also visiting the High Line. Referring to the onsite instructions, the group self-organizes according to chess: relatives rules.

Once the group is organized into the pieces they fit into, the two players play the game, moving the human “pieces” as in a standard game of chess. Once the game begins, the players are no longer allowed to ask for clarification on what kind of piece each person represents. As one of the most interactive artworks exhibited on the High Line, chess: relatives will spark new connections, conversations, and debate amongst visitors. The piece also gives visitors the chance to become a part of an artwork that aims to ask more questions about art than it can answer.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Courtesy of the artist

Suprina, In Someone Else’s Shoes
October 19, 2017 to April 30, 2018
Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Suprina’s installation titled In Someone Else’s Shoes is a 5’ high shoe that one can sit in, on, or under and imagine what it’s like to literally and figuratively be in someone else’s shoes. The surface of the shoe is a mosaic of objects that any of us might toss away but also binds us together. Viewers and sitters are encouraged to explore the surface with sight and touch to find objects with which they or a fellow sitter might personally relate.  

The New Bench is a series of public art projects in which three artists reinvent the park bench to challenge ideas around parks, communal places and how communities coexist within these spaces. The artists play with materials and structure to encourage conversation across ages and cultures and create a dialogue with the natural and urban environments. 

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance  and the Art in FLUX.

Courtesy of the artist

Hugh Hayden, The Jones Part II
November 4, 2017 to April 30, 2018
Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The Jones Part II by Hugh Hayden is part of a body of work that explores camouflage as a means of assimilation into social environments.  The work mimics a park picnic table constructed from rough-hewn fallen trees.  The profusion of branches appear static and unclear, as if they are either growing from the wood or disintegrating.  The branches prevent the picnic table from being used, instead offering a reflection on our relationship with nature as a material resource and the setting of social interactions.

The New Bench is a series of public art projects in which three artists reinvent the park bench to challenge ideas around parks, communal places and how communities coexist within these spaces. The artists play with materials and structure to encourage conversation across ages and cultures and create a dialogue with the natural and urban environments. 

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance  and Art in FLUX. 

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

Queens

MADSTEEZ, BTN x MADSTEEZ Basketball Court, image courtesy of the artist MADSTEEZ: Mark Paul Daren

MADSTEEZ, BTN x MADSTEEZ Basketball Court
February 28, 2018 to February 27, 2019
Triborough Bridge Playground B, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The BTN x MADSTEEZ Basketball Court brings color and life to an existing court that lacked vibrancy. The design splits the court into East and West Divisions, 7 schools in each, and uses the two main colors of each school. The mural covers the full basketball court and extends outside the court lines offering a blue sideline.

Ruth Hofheimer, Birds of Paradise, courtesy of the Natural Areas Conservancy

Ruth Hofheimer, Birds of Paradise
September 1, 2017 to August 30, 2018
Bayswater Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

New York City-based artist Ruth Hofheimer has installed Birds of Paradise, a 500-foot-long mural at the gateway to Bayswater Park as part of an initiative to study, restore, and reinvigorate the park. Guided by the artist, neighborhood volunteers helped paint the mural using a simple paint-by-numbers process. Inspired by the wildlife in Bayswater Park and the larger ecosystem of Jamaica Bay, Hofheimer’s mural reflects the landscape, plants, and animals that live along the city's coastline. Images of herons, osprey, striped bass, Spanish mackerel, and marshy grasslands are incorporated into the public artwork. Birds, particularly herons, are the focus of Hofheimer’s design because of Jamaica Bay's famed reputation as a "birder’s paradise."

This exhibition is presented by the Natural Areas Conservancy and the Jamaica Bay-Rockaway Parks Conservancy

Daniele Frazier, The Giant Flowers
June 2017 to June 2018
Highland Park, Queens
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Description:

Daniele Frazier’s exhibition The Giant Flowers consists of five giant flowers made of rip-stop nylon fabric that will inflate and move hypnotically in the wind. Each twelve-foot-long brightly colored flower will be a unique design and will tower above the park twenty feet off the ground. Not only will these joyous flowers be an unexpected sight to behold, but they will provide park-goers a real-life illustration of the changing weather conditions.

Risa Puno, Common Ground, Photography by Justin Hoch

Risa Puno, Common Ground
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Rufus King Park, Queens
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Description:

Consisting of a grid of interconnected picnic tables with tiled mosaic surfaces, Common Ground is an interactive sculpture that literally brings people closer together. The shared tabletops and benches each have a different mosaic design inspired by the neighborhood’s unique mix of cultures, as well as by the patterns within the adjacent King Manor Museum. Common Ground is a celebration of harmony through diversity, imbued with the ideals of the park’s namesake, Rufus King.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant

Sam Holleran, Patrick Rowe and Mobile Print Power, Conocer y Compartir-We Find Each Other
June 20, 2017 to May 12, 2018
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
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Description:

Inspired by the luminaires of the 1964/65 World’s Fair, a series of illuminated sculptures guides parkgoers with graphic images that symbolize a specific place or potential experience within the park. Mobile Print Power facilitated two multilingual drawing and silkscreen printmaking sessions to create the images for the luminaires. The project builds on wayfinding suggestions that came out of The World’s Park, a project of the Design Trust for Public Space in partnership with the Queens Museum and NYC Parks.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

See all locations for this project

Staten Island

Lina Montoya, Mariposas Lamps
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Faber Pool and Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s Cien Años de Soledad, Montoya’s illuminated sculptures redefine the monarch butterfly as an icon of migration and freedom. This work is part of the series La Isla Bonita, a beautification project that seeks to transform public spaces through public art and community engagement.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Fitzhugh Karol, Eyes
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Tappen Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Eyes’ intersecting steel shapes are derived from the simple silhouettes of hillsides and stairs, and frame the park’s historic Village Hall. The integrated play feature provides a chance to engage with the work in a way that most sculptures do not allow, appealing to the community in a fundamental way.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

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