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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Current Exhibits

Bronx

Image: Together, Athanatos-for ever , Courtesy of the artist.

Vincent Parisot, Together, Athanatos-for ever
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Jardin De Las Rosas, Bronx, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Vincent Parisot is a Greece based artist who has exhibited worldwide. One of the works that has resulted from their home and its flora is Athanatos-for ever, a veritable wall painting. It represents an “agave americana,” which in Greece is called “Athanatos,” or “without end,” an allusion to its longevity. Often, there are hearts on its leaves, along with names of young couples who hope that the plant’s longevity will be transmitted to their love.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image: Celebrations, Courtesy of the artist.

Lady K Fever, Celebrations
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Jackson Forestâ??s Community Garden, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This mural is inspired by conversations with the garden’s founder about the history of the garden and plans for its future. On one side of the shed, silhouettes of a group of people clapping and celebrating, with reflections of the garden painted within the group’s outline. Other images incorporated into the design include a pumpkin patch, a flower bed, the garden’s pathway, an early morning scene, native butterflies, oversized flowers, and an array of green leaves and foliage.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image credit: Chat Travieso, The Boogie Down (Youth) Booth, courtesy of the artist.

Chat Travieso, The Boogie Down (Youth) Booth
June 1, 2019 to May 31, 2020
Keltch Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Boogie Down (Youth) Booth is colorful public installation that brings Bronx music, solar-powered lights, seating, and community art to an underutilized space at Keltch Park on 170th Street and Jerome Avenue in the Highbridge/Concourse area of the South Bronx.

it follows three previous booths, installed between 2014 and 2016 at different sites in Crotona Park East and Melrose. Designed by Chat Travieso, this newest booth was informed by the “Yes Loitering” Project, a public space and safety youth initiative that sought to investigate how teens might be excluded from or targeted in public spaces, and developed ideas on how to create more youth-powered spaces. The research project was led by Travieso and a team of Bronx teens from the area. The group of young researchers met with community members, merchants, and other key stakeholders to gather valuable input regarding neighborhood needs.

Like all previous booths, the Boogie Down (Youth) Booth pays tribute to the rich culture of the Bronx, as expressed through music. It incorporates solar-powered speakers that stream music continuously, featuring a playlist curated by Elena Martinez and Bobby Sanabria of WHEDco’s Bronx Music Heritage Center, showcasing the sounds of the borough, including salsa, jazz, Afro-Caribbean rhythms, hip-hop, Garifuna, and blues.

This exhibition is presented by WHEDco

Brooklyn

Image: Together, We Will Grow, Courtesy of the artist.

ArtisticAfro, Together, We Will Grow
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Eden’s Community Garden, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This mural’s inspiring design invites neighborhood children to want to learn about the benefits of growing their own food. Through that bond with gardening, the hope is that the garden will eventually become their safe space. Natural elements are matched with the garden's motto "Together, we will grow." The front of the shed carries this similar theme with an image of someone's hands holding a potted plant with a seedling inside. Through loving, nurturing, and growing plants, you love, nurture, and grow yourself.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image Courtesy of the Artist.

Leonard Ursachi, Bunker Head
October 10, 2019 to October 9, 2020
University Place, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Romanian artist Leonard Ursachi’s “Bunker Head” is a large, stylized human head – evocative of bunker embrasures- covered in stainless steel mirrors. .The sculpture “bandaged” in gauze, evokes not only the wounded, but also the healing. The highly stylized nature of its “face” will reference iconic heads from countless cultures, from shaman to soldier, from poet to prophet. The artist carved the sculpture in rigid foam and covered it with Styrocrete, a cement-like material that is used on top of foam in building construction. The “openings” will be shallow recesses covered with stainless steel mirrors.

Image Credit: Evan Rossell and Dee Rosse, Tune Squad Court, Photo by Travel Creative.

Evan Rossell and Dee Rosse, Tune Squad Court
August 1, 2019 to July 31, 2020
Rodney Playground North, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The mural features beloved Looney Tunes characters: Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Sylvester, Tweety, and Taz. This exhibition is presented by Warner Brothers.

Image credit: Image courtesy of the artist

Bill Soltis, Under the Sun
August 27, 2019 to July 31, 2020
Greenstreet on Flatbush Avenue between 7th Avenue and Park Place, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Under the Sun is one of a series of sculptures by Brooklyn-based artist Bill Soltis about experimentation with the human form, positive and negative relationships and the interplay between the figure and a sculptural environment. The final piece is a marriage of these elements and the environment in which the sculpture rests. In his art, Soltis experiments with shapes, images, patterns, and lines, allowing the construction process to create the idea, rather than forcing a completely formed idea into becoming an object. As a subject, the human figure lends itself well to this open process. It can be left representational or made abstract. Its form can be smooth, angular, sharp, or curved, with active, passive, or emotive gestures. He often works with welded metal due to its versatility, permanence, and strength and ability to survive indoor, outdoors, in gardens, or urban settings equally well.

This exhibition is presented in partnership with North Flatbush Business Improvement District.

Image: courtesy of NYC Parks

Patrice Payne, Pillar Murals
July 6, 2019 to July 5, 2020
Marion Hopkinson Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This exhibition repurposes six concrete pillars situated along the park’s pathways from the Chauncey Street entrance, which were recently scraped, cleaned, and repainted during an It's My Park project organized by the Marion Street Park Block Association, a local community organization. Local artist Patrice Payne has created six 20 by 20 inch mini-murals on the tops of each of the pillars, each depicting familiar neighborhood scenes or local floral and fauna. Nothin’ But Net depicts a group of basketball players who use the adjacent courts, while The Many Faces of Brooklyn show the diversity of the surrounding neighborhood. A colorful water hydrant in Brooklyn Summers evokes warmer weather, as does the shade of a tree in A Mulberry Tree Grows in Ocean Hill. The park’s unofficial bird can be seen in House Sparrow, and the ubiquitous Scarlet Runner Bean makes an appearance atop another pillar.

Funding for this exhibition has been provided by the Citizens Committee for New York City and Marion Street Park Block Association.

MADSTEEZ, Together As ONE
June 18, 2019 to June 17, 2020
Park Slope Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Mark Paul Deren, aka MADSTEEZ is known for his vivid, large-scale, multi-layered paintings, where strange and familiar figures are integrated into abstract landscapes. His artistic approach is influenced by being almost blind in one eye, where he sees only abstractions and lines of colors, most notably reds, purples, and oranges, which appear frequently in his work.

This exhibition is presented by EA Sports.

Photo: Fitzhugh Karol, Field's Jax IV at Bar and Grill Park, Courtesy of the artist.

Fitzhugh Karol, Field's Jax IV
April 29, 2019 to April 28, 2020
Bar and Grill Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Field’s Jax, created by Brooklyn-based sculptor Fitzhugh Karol, is a series of four works created using steel recycled from a previous single large sculpture, now re-conceived as smaller and more interactive sculptures. Scattered throughout DUMBO, the sculptures’ lyrical arrangement encourages pedestrians to try to spot the next one and explore the neighborhood. For Field’s Jax, Karol worked with nine parts from his monumental sculpture Eyes, which was on view in Staten Island’s Tappen Park in 2017. The other two sculptures are located at Front Street at York Street, and in front of Bridge Street on the corner of Prospect and Jay Streets, and exhibited with the NYC DOT Art Program.

This exhibition is presented by the DUMBO BID.

Photo: Fitzhugh Karol, Field's Jax I at Clumber Corner, Courtesy of the artist.

Fitzhugh Karol, Field's Jax I
April 29, 2019 to April 28, 2020
Clumber Corner, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Field’s Jax, created by Brooklyn-based sculptor Fitzhugh Karol, is a series of four works created using steel recycled from a previous single large sculpture, now re-conceived as smaller and more interactive sculptures. Scattered throughout DUMBO, the sculptures’ lyrical arrangement encourages pedestrians to try to spot the next one and explore the neighborhood. For Field’s Jax, Karol worked with nine parts from his monumental sculpture Eyes, which was on view in Staten Island’s Tappen Park in 2017. The other two sculptures are located at Front Street at York Street, and in front of Bridge Street on the corner of Prospect and Jay Streets, and exhibited with the NYC DOT Art Program.

This exhibition is presented by the DUMBO BID.

Image credit: Courtesy of the artist

Courtney McCloskey, Pieces of Poetry: a community mosaic celebration
April 13, 2019 to April 12, 2020
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Pieces of Poetry: a community mosaic celebration is an artist led, community-generated project that will turn hundreds of broken glass shards into a mosaic celebrating three of Fort Greene’s literary greats—Walt Whitman, Richard Wright, and Marianne Moore. The mosaic depicts a bookshelf containing books that display the titles of famous works by Whitman, Wright and Moore on their spines. The artist worked with students from PS 20, The Greene Hill School, Science, Language & Arts International School and Brooklyn Technical High School to create the mosaic pieces and tiles.

This exhibition is presented by the Fort Greene Park Conservancy. Funding and support provided by the Lily Auchincloss Foundation, the Buckhorn Association, UrbanGlass, GasWorksNYC, NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, and the New York City Council.

Image Credit: Daniele Fraizer, Ecology Sampler: 40.684523 Latitude, -73.886898 Longitude, courtesy of the artist

Daniele Frazier, Ecology Sampler: 40.684523 Latitude, -73.886898 Longitude
March 20, 2019 to March 19, 2020
Highland Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Ecology Sampler by Daniele Frazier is a 6’ x 10’ handmade flag depicting fifteen notable creatures that live or migrate through Highland Park and the Ridgewood Reservoir in Brooklyn. The flag is flanked by eight additional flags along the yardarm that highlight the silhouettes of local tree leaves. Atop the 30-foot flag pole is an eight-inch-diameter, hand painted earth.

Flags are typically used to mark territories, boundaries, and ownership. In this case, Frazier subverts their normal use by displaying living things and migrating species that do not know or abide by boundaries.

In quilting a sampler is a quilt that does not repeat the same block pattern within its layout – a representative collection of one's technical skillset. In this case, the public artwork is not only a sampler of quilt blocks, but a sampler of the local ecology.

The site for this artwork is on the Atlantic Flyway bird migratory path, and features a large body of water. These two characteristics make this park, which is a protected wetland, a uniquely hospitable ecosystem for migrating birds. There are over 160 bird species that inhabit or travel through Highland Park, in addition to a diverse network of local plants and wildlife. Through educating the community about its unique flora and fauna, Frazier hopes to inspire a new generation of citizen conservationists to keep urban communities safe and clean for all wildlife species.

Image: Harold Ancart, Subliminal Standard, courtesy of Public Art Fund, Photo by Nicholas Knight.

Harold Ancart, Subliminal Standard
May 1, 2019 to March 1, 2020
Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Subliminal Standard, an interactive new commission by Brooklyn-based, Belgian-born artist Harold Ancart. The artist has constructed a large scale painted concrete sculpture inspired by New York City’s ubiquitous handball courts, which have fascinated Ancart for years because of their unexpected relationship to the history of abstraction. The painting references the traditional boundary lines of the court and the inadvertent abstract compositions created when city courts are repaired and repainted to mask graffiti and weathering over time.

Popularized by early 20th century immigrants to the United States, handball is among the most democratic sports, requiring nothing more than a small ball and a wall to play. The handball court is also the only type of playground that offers a freestanding double-sided wall which, according to the artist, “offers a unique possibility to show painting in a public space.” Ancart’s immersive sculpture will create a place for interaction, while bringing to light the ever-present painterly qualities that inherently exist in the structure of the handball court.  The title of the work poetically references the unintended abstract compositions and patterns created through their use and wear in relation to the standard lines that mark the limits of the playgrounds. 

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund

Manhattan

Image: Flora_Interpretations, Courtesy of the artist.

Rose & Mike DeSiano, Flora_Interpretations
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Clinton Community Garden, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This mural is inspired by two native New Yorkers, and members of several community gardens, who understand the value of green space in a big city. The artists invited local residents to the garden to take photos during a guided tour. The images were transformed in to a wall covering mural and was installed with their help. The mural reflects the beauty of this local garden that is possible through the hard work of the volunteers.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image credit: Simone Leigh, Brick House, photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Simone Leigh, Brick House
June 5, 2019 to September 30, 2020
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For the inaugural High Line Plinth commission, Simone Leigh presents Brick House, a sixteen-foot-tall bronze bust of a Black woman. The torso is a combination of the forms of a skirt and a clay house. The figure stands tall and monumental atop the Plinth, gazing resolutely down 10th Avenue.  Brick House is the first monumental work in Anatomy of Architecture, Leigh’s continuing series of sculptures that combine architectural forms from regions as varied as West Africa and the American South with the human body. The sculpture references numerous architectural forms: Batammaliba architecture from Benin and Togo; the teleuk of the Mousgoum people of Cameroon and Chad; and the restaurant Mammy’s Cupboard in the southern U.S. All three references inform both the formal elements of the work—the conflated image of woman and architecture—and its conceptual framework.

Leigh’s Brick House will be centered on the Spur, standing in sharp contrast to the disparate elements of the immediate architectural landscape. The Plinth is the focal point of the Spur, a site whose architectural and human scales are in constant vertiginous negotiation, surrounded by a competitive landscape of glass-and-steel towers shooting up from among older industrial-era brick buildings. In this space, Leigh’s magnificent Black female figure challenges visitors to think more immediately about the architecture around them, and how it reflects customs, values, priorities, and society as a whole.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line . 

Image caption: Chloë Bass, Wayfinding, 2019. Photo: SaVonne Anderson

Chloë Bass, Chloë Bass: Wayfinding
September 28, 2019 to September 27, 2020
St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Studio Museum in Harlem presents Chloë Bass: Wayfinding, the conceptual artist’s first institutional solo exhibition. This monumental commission features twenty-four site-specific sculptures that gesture toward the structural and visual vernacular of public wayfinding signage. The exhibition begins with and revolves around three central questions, poetically penned by the artist and featured throughout the park in billboard form: How much of care is patience? How much of life is coping? How much of love is attention? Through a combination of text and archival images, Bass’s sculptures activate an eloquent exploration of language, both visual and written, encouraging moments of private reflection in public space.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Musem in Harlem.

Image courtesy of JACOBSCHANG Architecture

JACOBSCHANG Architecture, El Barrio Bait Station
September 17, 2019 to September 16, 2020
East River Esplanade, Manhattan

Description:

The El Barrio Bait Station melds art, function and community by providing a useful working bait station for the local anglers, and by bringing innovative design to a waterfront in need of investment and reinvention. Not only a necessary amenity for the fishermen that line the edges of the East River day and night during the fishing seasons, the project will also serve as a catalyst for activating the neglected stretch of the river. The sculptural kiosk serves as a place to cut bait, or gut and prepare fish that are caught in addition to providing additional lighting, orientation, and educational information about fishing in the area. The bait station also includes a helpful illustration by Clarisa Diaz depicting the fish of the East River, provided courtesy of Gothamist/WNYC.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th Streets) and JACOBSCHANG Architecture with funding provided by NYS Sea Grant.

Image credit: Photo by Nicholas Knight, courtesy of Public Art Fund

Jean-Marie Appriou, The Horses
September 11, 2019 to August 30, 2020
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Jean-Marie Appriou’s massive equine sculptures stand like surreal sentinels at the entrance to Central Park. The artist was inspired by the horses nearby who pull tourists in carriages through the city and by Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s gilded monument of William Tecumseh Sherman on horseback just opposite this site at Grand Army Plaza. However, Appriou’s sculptures poetically reimagine the species. The artist carved clay and foam models to cast in aluminum, emphasizing the tool marks and fingerprints of his tactile process. The works’ jagged textures and silvery surfaces create a dynamic play of light and shadow as we move around them, emphasizing the hallucinatory qualities of their composition and imbuing them with a dreamlike energy.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Image courtesy of Marcus Garvey Park Alliance

Susan Stair, Roots on Fire
August 18, 2019 to August 1, 2020
Harlem Art Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Representing trees spreading roots and symbolizing stability, Roots on Fire is a two-dimensional installation situated on the lattice fence in Harlem Art Park. Within the roots and trunk of the tree, unfurling flags represent a call to preserve the cultural heritage of the diverse ethnic groups that have come to live together in East Harlem over the past 150 yearsRoots on Fire is an invitation to celebrate the East Harlem’s continuous growth and strength, extending to outsiders and newcomers to learn about the cultural forbearers of a historically immigrant community. 

Roots on Fire is made possible in part with funding from the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation and administered by LMCC. Additional funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance with support from the Harlem Community Development Corporation and the Durst Organization.

Image credit: Laura Bohill, CommUNITY Cities, Courtesy of the artist.

Laura Bohill, CommUNITY Cities
June 27, 2019 to June 26, 2020
St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
?CommUNITY Cities uses hands as a centerpiece in the mural design, representing the connectedness found in communities. Like the City itself, this court has images of natural elements like plants and flowers intermixing with symbols representing technology and the cityscape. Bohill notes that healthy communities are not possible without vision and heart, two prominent graphic elements on either side of the basketball court.

This exhibition is presented by the NY Knicks and Squarespace.

Image: courtesy of the artist

Naomi Lawrence, La Flor De Mi Madre
July 9, 2019 to June 25, 2020
Eugene McCabe Field, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Naomi Lawrence’s crocheted flowers are beloved and familiar accents around the East Harlem neighborhood. Using acrylic yarn, Naomi Lawrence has created a colorful mural fence mural made of crocheted flowers that celebrate the diversity of people who make up the East Harlem community one intricate, crocheted petal at a time. There is a trio of giant flowers including a pink dahlia for Mexico, a purple and yellow Christmas orchid for Colombia, and a red hibiscus for Puerto Rico. These are surrounded by smaller flowers like white frangipani representing the Ivory Coast, lush pink bayahibe representing the Dominican Republic, and impala lilies representing Ghana. The smaller flowers were created in collaboration with fiber artists from the neighborhood. At 12 feet high and 25 feet wide, this is the largest installation the artist has completed to date.

La Flor De Mi Madre is made possible in part with public funds from Creative Engagement, supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and administered by LMCC. Additional funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance with support from the Harlem Community Development Corporation and the Durst Organization.

Image: courtesy of the artist

Capucine Bourcart, EAT ME!
July 9, 2019 to June 25, 2020
Eugene McCabe Field, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Prompted by the artist Capucine Bourcart’s observations of children in her neighborhood unhealthy snacks as they were heading to and from school, this playful and humorous installation encourages all who pass by, especially youth, to make nutritious food choices. The artist created 1,500 photo-printed aluminum square tiles in her signature photo assemblage style, which are hung on the field’s chain-link fence and spell out the text “EAT ME!” The images printed on the tiles are fragmented, detailed pictures of healthy foods like fruits and vegetables, all of which the artist purchased locally in the neighborhood. From a distance, the images appear abstract in their composition, with various textures and unique colors. Up close the deconstructed presentation reveals the true subject of this installation: nutrition, a global health challenge especially present in Harlem.

EAT ME!  is made possible in part with funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance with support from the Harlem Community Development Corporation and the Durst Organization.

Saya Woolfalk, Alley-Oop, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Saya Woolfalk, Alley-Oop
May 25, 2019 to May 24, 2020
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Saya Woolfalk is a New York-based artist who uses science fiction and fantasy to re-imagine the world in multiple dimensions. Through a series of multi-year projects, Woolfalk has created the world of the Empathics, a fictional race of women who are able to alter their genetic make-up and fuse with plants. With each body of work, Woolfalk continues to build the narrative of these women's lives, and questions the utopian possibilities of cultural hybridity. In her design for Marcus Garvey Park, Woolfalk has turned the court into a fantastical, colorful mandala. Her court has been painted with the nonprofit youth development organization Publicolor, which uses design-based programs to engage at-risk students in education, college and career.

NYC Parks’ Creative Courts initiative transforms dated sports courts and asphalt plazas across Manhattan into vibrant and welcoming places by inviting artists to create original murals that re-engage communities with their local parks. The Facebook Art Department’s Artist in Residence program (FB AIR) invites artists to create site-specific art installations around the world at Facebook offices and, increasingly, in the public realm, with the aim of bringing together diverse communities in real life and encouraging the exploration of creative and innovative thinking.

Robert Otto Epstein, 5b9k3q@^tg6!+2F<%O, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Robert Otto Epstein, 5b9k3q@^tg6!+2F<%O
May 25, 2019 to May 24, 2020
Chelsea Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Robert Otto Epstein employs a grid-based style that started with an interest in knitting patterns, which provide a coded plan to create something physical. Epstein’s work also investigates how larger systems, patterns and language are assembled, pulled apart or remade into something new. Epstein’s design, titled “5b9k3q@^tg6!+2F<%O,” reflects the fast-pace, rapid movements of basketball, and how players attempt to outmaneuver their opponents by executing complex ‘picks and rolls,’ screens, and other plays in and around the basket. He believes the mural design will provide players with an energetic space on which to dribble, dream, and score.

NYC Parks’ Creative Courts initiative transforms dated sports courts and asphalt plazas across Manhattan into vibrant and welcoming places by inviting artists to create original murals that re-engage communities with their local parks. The Facebook Art Department’s Artist in Residence program (FB AIR) invites artists to create site-specific art installations around the world at Facebook offices and, increasingly, in the public realm, with the aim of bringing together diverse communities in real life and encouraging the exploration of creative and innovative thinking.

Art Students League, Model to Monument
May 22, 2019 to May 21, 2020
Riverside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Now in its seventh year, the Art Students League’s Model to Monument (M2M) sculptors are addressing the theme “Coming Ashore” with monumental works exploring topics of immigration, refuge, fluidity, organic and ancient forces. The artists are: Damon Hamm & Jeff Sundheim (Wavehenge), Gaia Grossi (Gaea), and Frank Michielli (Moiré.) “The scale and ambition of these installations reflect a long tradition at The League to support great sculpture and elevate the daily lives of New Yorkers,” says Executive Director Michael Rips.

This exhibition is presented by the Art Students League.

Photo courtesy of the artist.

Bob Lobe, SUPERSTORM
May 20, 2019 to May 19, 2020
Duarte Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Using the repoussé technique, artist Robert Lobe has recreated a tree that was torn out of the ground during Superstorm Sandy.  Lobe hammered aluminum around the felled tree and corresponding bolder to replicate their shattered forms. Though the original tree was located in along the Appalachian Trail in Northwest New Jersey at Harmony Ridge Farm and Campground, this sculpture also acts as a temporary memorial to and reminder of the storm’s devastation in downtown Manhattan, the artist’s home. 

This majestic sculpture embodies the current conversations around climate change and global warming. Though the crippled tree is ominous and threatening, Lobe has also captured the beauty of the original tree and its surrounding environment.

Image Courtesy of the NYC  Parks.

Rubem Rubierb, Dream Machine: Dandara
November 4, 2019 to May 4, 2020
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Brazilian artist Rubem Robierb has become internationally for his uplifting sculptures of oversized, stylized wings. Designed for public interaction, Dream Machine: Dandara has a space between the two 10-foot high, pearl white fiberglass wings for viewers to place themselves. Robierb’s Dream Machine sculptures are named after someone forgotten or famous who lived or died fighting for their own dreams, or for the dreams of others. This sculpture, the newest in this series, is named Dandara in memory of a transgender woman who was brutally attacked and murdered in Brazil in 2017. Dream Machine: Dandara is dedicated to the transgender/gender non-conforming community. 

This exhibition is presented by Taglialatella Galleries.

Leander Knust, Re-Material Wall
April 14, 2019 to April 13, 2020
West 111th Street People’s Garden, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The solar panel atop Leander Mienardus Knust’s Re-material Wall powers an electroforming process that slowly transfers copper molecules from suspended pipes to individual wires each floating in a solution-filled jar. Over time these molecules accumulate and take unique forms as a physical trace of their carrier electricity while the steel rusts, wood warps, vines grow, and piping disappears.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens program. 

Image credit: Ruth Ewan, Silent Agitator, 2019. Rendering courtesy Friends of the High Line

Ruth Ewan, Silent Agitator
April 3, 2019 to March 31, 2020
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
For the High Line, Scottish artist Ruth Ewan presents a monumental-scale, double-sided clock on the park at 24th Street, also visible from street level. The clock is based on an illustration originally produced for the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) labor union by the North American writer and labor activist Ralph Chaplin. The illustration was one of many images that appeared on “stickerettes,” known as “silent agitators,” millions of which were printed in red and black on gummed paper and distributed by union members traveling from job to job. The clock nods to the round-the-clock organizing work of the IWW, and the ubiquity of the clock in labor struggles: both the ways that factory owners separated private and public time and the fights for the now-diminishing labor rights we have today, such as the five-day work week and eight-hour workday. The installation is Ruth Ewan’s first public artwork in the United States.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line . 

Image credit: courtesy of the artist

Anina Gerchick, BIRDLINK
June 10, 2019 to March 31, 2020
Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
BIRDLINK is an interactive habitat sculpture whose mission is to support migratory birds by inserting native plant systems throughout the urban and suburban corridors through which they travel. There, people can learn about the challenges facing bird populations, and enjoy more space. BIRDLINK attracts the wild birds that reside or migrate through the city with native plants at the empty lower and middle canopy levels. It responds to community interests, highlights the shared the urban ecosystem and bridge cultural differences through the universal of birds. This park in a busy, economically and culturally diverse neighborhood also hosts the African M’Finda Kalunda Garden and the Chinese Hua Mei Bird Garden for exotic caged songbirds.

Image credit: Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, En Plein Air
April 19, 2019 to March 30, 2020
Multiple locations
The High Line, Manhattan

Description:
?En Plein Air, inspired by the unique site of the High Line, examines and expands the tradition of outdoor painting. The title refers to the mid-19th century practice of en plein air painting (French for “in the open air”). The inclination to paint outside was one reaction to the overwhelming transformations of life in urban centers, as nature and cities redefined each other under the pressure of modernization—a history that connects to that of the High Line, a remnant of the industrial era of the neighborhood. The artists in the exhibition not only bring painting outside but imagine nature as context, subject, and collaborator. They approach the history, methodologies, and content of outdoor painting from a variety of perspectives. The High Line is an apt site for the consideration of the importance of landscape painting in our time, as the natural features of the park juxtapose with the artificial scenery of the surrounding billboards, building facades and walls, and variety of advertisements. Through the participation of an international group of artists, En Plein Air challenges the kinds of work traditionally associated with public art—sculptures and murals—by presenting freestanding, outdoor paintings that can be viewed in the round and in dialogue with the surrounding landscapes.

Artists who are part of this exhibition include Ei Arakawa, Firelei Báez, Daniel Buren, Sam Falls, Lubaina Himid, Lara Schnitger, Ryan Sullivan, and Vivian Suter.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Image credit: Courtesy of NYC Parks

Nicolas Holiber, Nicolas Holiber: Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project
May 17, 2019 to January 31, 2020
Dante Park and Broadway Malls from 64th Street to 157th Street, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Nicolas Holiber: Birds on Broadway, the Audubon Sculpture Project features ten oversized sculptures of New York City birds that are in danger of extinction due to climate change, displayed along the Broadway malls, a tree-lined greenway between 64th and 157th Streets in Manhattan. Each sculpture is made entirely out of reclaimed, untreated lumber, allowing for the city’s natural forces to affect it and highlight the environmental challenges faced by each species. Holiber gives meaning to materials that had no use is amplified when paired with the exhibition’s alarming message about climate change. The birds in this exhibition were chosen from the National Audubon Society’s 2014 Birds and Climate Change Report. From among the 145 threatened species that reside in or migrate through New York, Holiber decided to showcase the American bittern, brant, common goldeneye, double-crested cormorant, hooded merganser, peregrine falcon, red-necked grebe, scarlet tanager, snowy owl, and wood duck.

This exhibition is presented by Broadway Mall Association, Gitler &_______ Gallery, and the New York City Audubon Society.

Leonardo Drew, City in the Grass
June 3, 2019 to December 15, 2019
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

City in the Grass presents a topographical view of an abstract cityscape atop a patterned panorama. Building on the artist’s signature techniques of assemblage and additive collage, the installation extends over 100 feet long with a richly textured surface that invites visitor engagement.

For City in the Grass, Drew has crafted a sprawling work of varied materials that undulates across the lawn and, at various points, crescendo into rising towers. These sculptures grow in and around a patterned surface made of colored sand that mimics Persian carpet designs and reflects the artist’s interest in East Asian decorative traditions and global design more broadly. Bringing together domestic and urban motifs, City in the Grass invites the Park’s visitors to walk on its surface and to explore the abstract terrain of the work from all angles.

This exhibition is presented by Mad. Sq. Art

Queens

Photo: courtesy of RPGA Studio, Inc.

Yvonne Shortt with Jenna Boldebuck, Mayuko Fujino and Joel Esquite, Rigged
July 10, 2019 to July 9, 2020
MacDonald Park, Queens
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Description:

Rigged is a visual commentary on our social, political, and economic systems. It asks viewers to investigate such systems with the installation’s series rabbits and carrots placed on a 3-dimensional maze. The maze has windows that provide a glimpse inside the maze structure, along with a series of staircases that lead from one level to the next, yet there is no perceptible entrance or exit point. The maze was designed by the arts non-profit RPGA Studio, Inc., and the community was invited to design the rabbit/carrot sculptures.

This exhibition is presented by RPGA Studio, Inc. and Friends of MacDonald Park.

Pavilion Landing, Courtesy of the artist.

Yvonne Shortt, with Joel Esquite, Mayuko Fujino, Pavilion Landing
June 10, 2019 to June 9, 2020
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Yvonne Shortt’s Pavilion Landing tells the story a group of intergalactic children whose spaceship has landed in the park, after a long journey seeking a ray of hope generated by the 1964-65 New York World's Fair. Shortt spent several days in the park working collaboratively with park visitors to build four 16”-tall sculptures of children out of clay. She then made molds from the clay forms, which were used to cast concrete sculptures placed at David Dinkins Circle.  Their spacecraft, inspired by the Tent of Tomorrow’s iconic suspension roof, is fabricated in concrete and aluminum with a clear plastic top that enables visitors to see the ship’s control center with several children at the helm.

This exhibition is made possible by the Art in the Parks: Alliance for Flushing Meadows Corona Park Grant, which supports the creation of site-specific public artworks by Queens-based artists for two sites within Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

POOLTIME, Courtesy of the artists

Cheryl Wing-Zi Wong & Dev Harlan, POOLTIME
June 9, 2019 to June 8, 2020
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
POOLTIME aims to revive the concept of the Pool as social hub by creating the experience of being in (or under, in this case) the water of the pool. POOLTIME, located at the north end of Meadow Lake, is a public pavilion and series of community programs centered around the rich history of the park as a site for the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fairs. This public art pavilion pays homage to the historic Aquacade aquatic amphitheater constructed for the 1939 World’s Fair, and reused during the 1964 World’s Fair. Now demolished and largely forgotten, the Aquacade was a large community hub and heart of the park even decades after many of the other World’s Fair attractions had fallen into decay and disuse. This artwork draws awareness to the Aquacade’s social and spatial impact after the conclusion of the World’s Fair as more than just an architectural relic. The artists are interested in the pool’s history as a vibrant site for working-class families to convene, the pool as social hub, and the pool as a carved human intervention adjacent to Meadow Lake.

Amy M. Youngs, Becoming Biodiversity
June 1, 2019 to June 1, 2020
Willow Lake
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

An augmented reality app that encourages participants to explore and experience local, ecological networks present in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. Cell phones and headphones are used to experience this artwork, which includes mixed-reality animations and storytelling as an overlay to the actual park. The experience is an embodied one, designed to connect humans empathetically with the biodiversity, symbioses, and unseen worlds in public park spaces.

Fantastic ecologies exist everywhere on earth and at many scales, many of which are invisible to us. This artwork is a guided tour which will allow us to inhabit the worlds of multiple species along the trail, allowing them to become visible and “sense-able” to us. The viewer re-enacts stories from the perspectives of non-humans; playing the part of a plant calling out to a bird to help with pest control, an ant planting spring flowers while simultaneously feeding her babies, an underground fungal network delivering goods to struggling trees, and a cormorant searching for a meal in a man-made lake.

There are 8 scenes, each takes place at Willow Lake, on the South end of Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The starting point for the app tour is the East entrance of the Pat Dolan Trail.

The free app can be downloaded for iOS or Android. Links here: http://hypernatural.com/bb/

Collaborators include Josh Rodenberg, Danielle McPhatter, and Jayne Kennedy, with additional support from Harvestworks, the New York City Urban Field Station, and the Ohio State University.

Photo Credit: Cern, Yearly Sanctuary, courtesy of the artist.

Cern, Yearly Sanctuary
May 10, 2019 to May 9, 2020
Forest Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Audubon Mural Project enlists artists to paint climate-threatened birds, such as the Chestnut-sided Warbler, Veery, and Wood Thrush shown here in Cern’s mural Yearly Sanctuary. The bird species featured in the Audubon Mural Project are among the more than half of North American birds identified as climate-threatened by Audubon scientists in the 2014 Birds and Climate Change Report.

This project is presented by The Audubon Mural Project, a collaboration between the National Audubon Society and the Gitler Gallery, with support from the Forest Park Trust and the Dr. E. Lawrence Deckinger Family Foundation.

Image credit: Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Respecting Black Women and Girls in St. Albans, Photo by NYC Parks.

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, Respecting Black Women and Girls in St. Albans
April 12, 2019 to April 11, 2020
Daniel M. O'Connell Playground, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh is the NYC Commission on Human Rights’ Public Artist in Residence (PAIR).  A program administered with the Department of Cultural Affairs, PAIR embeds artists within city agencies to address pressing civic issues through creative practice. Fazlalizadeh’s mural features the images of several faces, inspired by local Queens-based women she has met within community conversations, and text capturing the experiences of community members facing the daily indignities of anti-Black racism and sexism. The mural is intended to place, front and center, the voices and images of women of color and challenge societal norms that allow sexism and racism to persist.

This exhibition is presented by the NYC Commission on Human Rights and the Department of Cultural Affairs.

Image: Jose Carlos Casado, Community: You never really know your own language until you study another, Courtesy of the artist.

Jose Carlos Casado, Community: You never really know your own language until you study another
April 6, 2019 to April 5, 2020
Rufus King Park, Queens
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Description:

Jose Carlos Casado’s installation reflects typical protest posters that people make for different public manifestations. Where protest signs normally reflect someone’s opinion on a matter, Jose's sculptures become unique portraits of people from within the community. Jose worked with 10 volunteers from the community, capturing images of their palms and running these photos through 3D imaging software, creating an abstraction of the hand. As no two palms are alike, these photos capture the uniqueness of a person. The rear side of each structure also reflects the volunteers; they are painted in the pantone color matching that person’s skin tone and include text about the person it represents.

Participation is a key theme throughout Jose public artwork. The volunteers he worked with became an important part of this piece and he plans on donating the individual artworks back to the volunteers once the work is removed from the park. This work also allows a viewer to connect with it through an interactive augmented reality app that Jose designed.

This project is part of Queens Council on the Arts' public art program ArtSite.

Image credit: courtesy of the artist

Bennett Lieberman, Color Columns
June 1, 2019 to March 20, 2020
Queensbridge Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Placed along the park’s waterfront pathway near a semicircle of benches, three “color columns” create fortuitous interactions among themselves, and harmonize with the East River and the park’s green foliage. Texts inscribed on the colorful prism facets riff on the poetic and lucid state of mind produced by epicyclic movement from one season into another. The prism facets are inspired by the luminous arrays of elegantly designed paint chips found in local hardware emporia and home furnishing mega-stores alike. When paired with their given names, these color groups present perfect opportunities to develop brief narratives or small poems that draw us deeper into the experience of color. The chromatic fields, especially in large format, add a physical dimension, like song lyrics, to the experience of language.

Image: Gabriela Salazar; ‘Access Grove, Soft Stand;’ 2019; Courtesy the Artist

Various Artists, The Socrates Annual
October 5, 2019 to March 8, 2020
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Each fall Socrates presents an exhibition of new commissions made by artists awarded the Park’s Socrates Annual Fellowship. Produced on-site in our outdoor studio over the course of the summer, these artworks engage the Park’s unique history, landscape, and surrounding community. For the 2019 exhibition, projects range from a soundscape conflating the sounds of animals and man-made objects to a monument to the invasive Ailanthus plant. Approaches vary among collaborative investigations of authorship and visibility, the re-contextualization of domestic motifs, and the examination of biological material, among many others. Ranging from fantastical to anecdotal to pedagogical, this year’s artists use a variety of narrative strategies. Several artist projects examine storytelling’s many material manifestations, from an homage to a Native American myth in which North America exists on a turtle’s back to a suggestion that a giant has fallen asleep under the Park’s blanket of grass, its exposed nose becoming refuge for a wandering monitor lizard.

Participating artists are recipients of ‘The 2019 Socrates Annual Fellowship’ and were selected by Socrates’ Curator & Director of Exhibitions, Jess Wilcox, and the Park’s 2019 Curatorial Advisors – Rosario Güiraldes, Assistant Curator at The Drawing Center and Jennie Lamensdorf, Bay Area Lead at Facebook’s Art Department.The 2019 Socrates Annual artists are Jesus BenaventeTecumseh Ceaser (NativeTec)Martina Onyemeachi Crouch-Anyarogbu (MOCA)Rachelle DangChris DomenickHadi FallahpishehJes FanHadrien Gérenton & Loup SarionPaul KopkauAlva MoosesMarius Ritiu, Martin RothGabriela SalazarLucia Thomé, and Workers Art Coalition (WAC).

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Image credit: Courtesy of Josephine Herrick Project

Residents of the Queensbridge Houses, The F-Stop Project: We Are Queensbridge
October 25, 2019 to December 18, 2019
Queensbridge Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Consisting of over 90 images curated by award winning photographer and teaching artist Robin Dahlberg, this exhibition presents the work of over 60 residents of Long Island City’s Queensbridge Houses through which they describe their Queensbridge - the people, the spirit and the vitality of this community. The selected images have been printed on vinyl banners hung on the fence lining Vernon Boulevard, directly across the street from the largest public housing development in the country. The F-Stop Project and exhibition aim to challenge mainstream notions about Queensbridge Houses and public housing in general and to give residents the tools and platforms to frame the narrative about their community.

This exhibition is presented by the Josephine Herrick Project. The F-Stop Project is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

Staten Island

Lina Montoya, The Immigrant Journey -- Past Meets Present (Mural)
October 8, 2019 to October 7, 2020
Arrochar Playground, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This mural, depicting waves, mountains and stars, is a companion artwork to the  expansive fence installation above it. Together, the mural and the fence installation are a tribute to the immigrant communities of all times and an homage to New York Harbor. The fence installation is the result of a Residency Program with artist Lina Montoya and Sundog Theatre at P.S 39, a public school directly adjacent to this playground. The residency’s theme was cultural immigration and Ellis Island history, and the resulting design was inspired by the Staten Island Ferry and the boats that came to Ellis Island full of people.

Supported by Council Member Steven Matteo through the Cultural Immigrant Initiative grant awarded to Sundog Theatre, Inc. for artist Lina Montoya and PS 39 students.

Image courtesy of Sundog Theatre

Sundog Theatre, Inc. with Lina Montoya and students from PS 39, The Immigrant Journey – Past Meets Present
July 13, 2019 to June 12, 2020
Arrochar Playground, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This expansive fence installation is the result of a Residency Program with artist Lina Montoya and Sundog Theatre at P.S 39, a public school directly adjacent to this playground. The residency’s theme was cultural immigration and Ellis Island history, and the resulting design was inspired by the Staten Island Ferry and the boats that came to Ellis Island full of people. The central image is a large boat full of butterflies. The iconic Statue of Liberty is included in the design, as well as an airplane and a square figure in the lower right corner that references the southern border, an "open wall." This piece is a tribute to the immigrant communities of all times and an homage to New York Harbor.

Supported by Council Member Steven Matteo through the Cultural Immigrant Initiative grant awarded to Sundog Theatre, Inc. for artist Lina Montoya and PS 39 students.

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