NYC Resources311Office of the Mayor

Official Website of the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation

Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Public Art Map and Guide

Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

View the map

Search Current and Past Exhibits

  to  

Current Exhibits

Bronx

Art Students League, ...and We Breath
September 15, 2016 to September 15, 2017
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with NYC Parks that has culminated in the installation of the collaborative sculpture, …and We Breathe, at Van Cortlandt Park. This is the sixth year for the M2M program, which has installed nearly 50 monumental works in NYC parks since 2011. This piece by all seven M2M sculptors celebrates and explores the various aspects of “Air,” this year’s theme for Van Cortlandt Park. This installation was created by artists Aaron Bell, Sheila Berger, James Mikhel Emerson, Tanda Francis, Markus Rudolph Holtby, Shiho Sato, and Sarah Thompson Moore. The group also has works concurrently on view in Riverside South Park in Manhattan.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program.

Diana Perea, Bronx Tracks
July 2016 to July 2017
Railroad Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Created by Bronx artist Diana Perea, the Bronx Tracks was inspired by French muralist Nelio as well as the unique sounds, movement and cityscape of the Bronx. The mural is a site-specific installation designed to activate the park and to create a more pedestrian-friendly experience along E. 161st Street between the bustling courthouse center at Morris Avenue and the less trafficked three-block stretch to Elton Avenue. A team of young DreamYard artists and an intergenerational team of community volunteers installed the mural, spurring conversation, creativity, and a new favorite destination among community members and groups.

The mural’s abstract forms and vibrant colors reenergize Railroad Park, the adjacent NYCHA Morrisania Air Rights building, and the path to the often-overlooked Metro North Station directly behind it. Perea’s innovative techniques emphasize the beauty of the existing structures, and the mural’s influences by Picasso, Delaunay, Kandinsky, and Malevich can be admired by all who play in and pass by Railroad Park and E. 161st Street.

This exhibit is presented by WHEDco and The DreamYard Project in partnership with the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA).

Chat Travieso, Boogie Down Booth
May 17, 2016 to May 17, 2017
O'Neill Triangle, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This colorful new public installation brings music, solar–powered lights, seating, and community art to an underutilized space in Morrisania. This is the third Boogie Down Booth, designed by artist Chat Travieso. The first booth was installed at Southern Boulevard and Freeman Street, under the 2/5 line, in 2014, and the second was installed in Seabury Park in 2015 and will remain on view through June 24, 2016.

This booth Boogie Down Booth has solar–powered speakers that stream music that originated in the Bronx, including salsa, jazz, Afro–Caribbean, hip–hop, Garifuna, and blues. The playlist, curated by the Bronx Music Heritage Center, both celebrates the rich musical heritage of the borough and masks construction and vehicular traffic noise on the 161st Street corridor. The installation also provides much–needed picnic–style seating and solar–powered lighting to the park, which is located close to a bus stop, Boricua College, and 1,000+ units of housing. The booth also incorporates interactive elements like a community bulletin board and artwork by local artists and students. Community partners including DreamYard, BronxWorks, and Boricua College, who will collaborate on various activities at the booth throughout the year.

This exhibition is presented by WHEDco and the Bronx Music Heritage Center .

Brooklyn

Carole Eisner, Monumental Sculptures at Prospect Park
May 2016 to May 2017
Prospect Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For more than 45 years Eisner has been welding massive abstract sculptures from scrap and recycled metal. The four works that will be on view in Prospect Park are from a series Eisner created in the past 10 years from I–beams, rolled and twisted to create lyrical, elegant forms. This yearlong exhibition utilizes four key sites throughout the Park, chosen to maximize visitor access. The grassy triangle entrance facing Grand Army Plaza is home to Dancer, a 17–foot tall sculpture which spirals and soars upwards. Zerques, one of the smaller sculptures standing six and half feet tall will be placed on the lawn in front of the historic Litchfield Villa on 5th Street. Skipper, rising 13 feet and also constructed with curved I–beams, will greet visitors entering the Park from Bartel–Pritchard Square. Valentine II, named for its elegant heart shaped form, will be placed on the Peninsula in front of the Lake.

This exhibition is presented by Susan Eley Fine Art and the Prospect Park Alliance.

Photo credit Jacob Farber

Jacob Farber, Rene
August 22, 2016 to April 30, 2017
Valentino Pier, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

René is comprised of scrap wood found in nearby Gowanus, Brooklyn. The sculpture speaks to the community members and organizations that are being forgotten as neighborhoods develop. This work enhances the conversations related to sustainability and usefulness as they apply to Brooklyn, but also other communities where residents, businesses, and artists have been forced out by neighborhood change. Farber hopes that this work will serve as a reminder that communities can come together and find a sustainable way in which to move forward. The name of the sculpture relates to the theme of again finding a voice, being found, and–through cooperation and collaboration–being reborn

Untitled, photo courtesy of ISCP

Maartje Korstanje, Untitled
November 2, 2016 to January 27, 2017
Olive Street Garden, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Untitled is part of the group exhibition The Animal Mirror, on view nearby at the International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP). Korstanje’s site–specific installation consists of five sculptures and continues her investigations into the way art can intervene in the processes of the natural world. The sculptures are made from a mix of natural and human-made materials and are designed to serve as attractive homes for solitary bees. Unlike domesticated bees, solitary bees live alone, rather than in collective hives. Designed as much for use by the garden’s natural fauna as they are for the enjoyment of its human visitors, the sculptures will alter with the changing of the seasons.

Korstanje–a Dutch artist whose mother is a beekeeper–began her involvement with bees in 2006 in the midst of the first scientific reports of colony collapse disorder, in which a large number of honeybee colonies in North America and Europe suddenly and mysteriously disappeared. Traced to the use of industrial pesticides, among other causes, this phenomenon still poses a serious threat to agricultural production in the world, where bees play an essential role in pollinating many crops. Korstanje’s installation is meant to visually suggest swarming masses of insects, while the incorporated bamboo sticks and their hollow interiors also provide ready-made nesting grounds.

This exhibition is presented by International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP).

Manhattan

KAWS, New York Made: Stanton Street Courts, photo courtesy of Nike

KAWS, New York Made: Stanton Street Courts
November 17, 2016 to November 16, 2017
Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

New York Made: Stanton Street Courts by KAWS encompass two side-by-side full basketball courts (approximately 116 by 80 feet), as well as four hoops. “My approach to the courts was very similar to how I would work on canvas. I wanted to create something that was true to my language, but also considerate of this being a court that people are playing on,” the Brooklyn–based, world–renowned artist Brian Donnelly (KAWS) explains. “I wanted to find the sweet spot where it works visually and functionally – how its broken up by the game’s lines and works with my images. It will have an intimate effect on the players that use the court.”

KAWS first moved to Manhattan in 1996, and lived on the corner of Clinton and Stanton Street. His familiarity with the park and its neighborhood is thus extremely personal.

This exhibition is presented with Nike.

Amanda Long, Wishing Well, photo courtesy of the artist

Amanda Long, Wishing Well
October 29, 2016 to October 3, 2017
Dyckman Farmhouse Museum, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Wishing Well, a playful, site-specific, interactive sculpture, is an updated, technological interpretation of a fairy tale wishing well, a popular theme in European folklore. Wishing wells were believed to grant requests by way of magical waters or deities residing within. Visitors of all ages are encouraged to speak a wish into the well. The words are translated into a video ripple inside, and an echo repeats the words back. Turning the well’s crank activates video and microphone recordings, which are captured in a database inside the sculpture. The recordings will be curated and presented on a dedicated website, wishingwellnyc.org, bringing the artwork beyond the physical space of the park.

The Dyckman Farmhouse, a Dutch Colonial style farmhouse built c. 1784, was opened as a museum in 1916. Today it is nestled in a small garden and is an extraordinary reminder of early Manhattan and important part of the diverse Inwood neighborhood. The original well has long been absent from the house, although a replacement well-head was constructed around 1915-1916 during the restoration of the farmhouse. This well-head was removed sometime in the 1980’s and replaced by a simple wood platform. Installed at the site of the original well on the Dyckman property, Long’s video sculpture enlivens the vacant well site as a fantasy restoration.

This exhibition is presented by the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and the Historic House Trust, with support from the New York State Council on the Arts.

Photo credit Liz Gwinn

Kevin Beasley, Who's Afraid to Listen to Red, Black and GreenΑ
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
Morningside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Kevin Beasley is a New York-based artist interested in materials, sculpture, sound, and social exchange. Each of these three sculptures features a color of the Pan-African flag and consists of a mixture of resin, clothing, and housedresses sourced from a dress shop in East Harlem. Beasley calls the sculptures “acoustic mirrors,” and invites visitors to listen carefully as one speaks, sings, or otherwise projects sound into them.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Photo credit Liz Gwinn

Simone Leigh, A particularly elaborate imba yokubikira, or kitchen house, stands locked up while its owners live in diaspora
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Simone Leigh is a Brooklyn-based artist with a longstanding interest in African and African-American material culture and women’s work. These three round, clay-and-thatch hybrid sculptures, called imbas, resemble kitchen houses from rural areas of Zimbabwe and were created in collaboration with architect Maxwell Mutanda. They celebrate the expansiveness of the African diaspora, but also evoke the experience of living outside the place considered home.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Photo credit Alani Bass

Kori Newkirk, Sentra
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

A New York native now based in Los Angeles, Kori Newkirk is well known for creating multimedia works, often using materials associated with urban black life. Reminiscent of the artist’s signature beaded curtains, this work reframes the steps rising from St. Nicholas Avenue, and invites park visitors to reimagine an ordinary walk as a ceremonial procession.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Photo credit Liz Gwinn

Rudy Shepherd, Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber
August 25, 2016 to July 25, 2017
Jackie Robinson Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

A longtime resident of Upper Manhattan, Rudy Shepherd creates sculptures and performances intended to dispel people’s feelings of prejudice, violence, or disdain. Created from colored concrete, this work is a playful form with a very serious purpose—to open hearts and inspire positive energy, dialogue, and compassion.

inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, Simone Leigh, Kori Newkirk, Rudy Shepherd is a public art initiative presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. Site-specific artworks are on view in four Historic Harlem Parks—Morningside, Marcus Garvey, St. Nicholas, and Jackie Robinson—from August 25, 2016, to July 25, 2017. For more information, visit studiomuseum.org.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Kenny Scharf, TotemOh
June 22, 2016 to June 21, 2017
116th street
East River Esplanade, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This vibrant mural by internationally renowned artist Kenny Scharf is installed along the waterfront at 116th Street on the East River Esplanade in Harlem. Painted on an idle brick column, the totem of colorful faces is designed in Scharf’s recognizable cartoon-inspired style. A banner spanning over 50 feet, NEVERENDINGOGO, is installed adjacent to the column and will be on view through September 30, 2016. This public artwork corresponds with an exhibition of the artist’s work at the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn Harbor, NY.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th Streets).

Markus Rudolph Holtby, Leaves of Grass

Art Students League, Model to Monument (M2M)
June 16, 2016 to May 16, 2017
Riverside Park South, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with NYC Parks that has culminated in the installation of seven sculptures on view along Riverside Park South from 59th to 69th Streets. This is the sixth year at Riverside Park for the M2M program, which has installed nearly 50 monumental works in NYC parks since 2011.

The sculptures were created by an international team of selected League students during a nine-month program. The pieces for this exhibition explore Art in the Public Square. The artists are: The sculptors participating in the M2M program this year are Aaron Bell (Stand Tall, Stand Loud), Sheila Berger (AVIS GLORIAE ET LAVDIS MMXVI and Nature Eternal), James Emerson (Bridge), Tanda Francis (Everyone Breaks), Markus Rudolph Holtby (Leaves of Grass), Shiho Sato (Fragments) and Sarah Thompson Moore (Everything Between). The collaborative sculpture in Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx for 2016 is entitled …And We Breathe.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program and the Riverside Park Conservancy.

Naomi Lawrence, Lotus
May 3, 2016 to May 1, 2017
Eugene McCabe Field, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Chain link fences are ubiquitous. Naomi Lawrence uses these common spaces to frame color and texture in surprising ways, creating interaction between fibers, colors, fences, sidewalks, and passing pedestrians. Lawrence believes that small artistic gestures of intricate, colorful crochet can prompt reflection and appreciation for often overlooked or unappreciated corners of the urban enviornment.

This work is an extension of May 2016’s FLUX Public Art Projects, a FLUX Art Fair initiative. FLUX embodies Harlem’s creative spirit and cultural significance by bringing together original works, from large sculptural works and sound pieces to performance art and thought-provoking installations.

This exhibition is presented by Art in FLUX, FLUX Art Fair, and Marcus Garvey Park Alliance.

Lionel Smit Studio, Courtesy of CYNTHIA-REEVES

Lionel Smit, MORPHOUS
June 13, 2016 to April 30, 2017
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

MORPHOUS is an exploration of hybrid identity and its ever-changing nature within South Africa’s social landscape. This bronze sculpture, featuring the conjoined heads of two outward-gazing young women, evokes the question of time, of past and future, and a societal commentary without judgment. The “double-vision” portrayed in this work is simultaneously a foretelling of things to come and an acknowledgement of what has already passed. The figures are charged with an emotive and gestural energy, a hallmark of Smit’s evocative work. The spontaneous gestures in his three dimensional figural forms animate the beauty and grace of the faces he sees in the neighborhoods around his studio. The scale of his work invokes both a sense of celebration and power.

This is the South African artist’s first public art installation in the United States, and will be complemented by an exhibition of his work at CYNTHIA-REEVES’ gallery in North Adams, MA in July and August 2016. This exhibition is presented by CYNTHIA-REEVES, Union Square Partnership, and Art New York/Art Miami.

Courtesy of the artist

Yasumitsu Morito, Spirit of New York City
October 25, 2016 to April 25, 2017
Carl Schurz Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Japanese artist Yasumitsu Morito designed Spirit of New York City to harmonize with the setting of Carl Schurz Park. The work sits just above the Hoop Garden, surrounded by trees lining the pathway to the promenade along the East River. Yasumitsu’s work addresses the human form within space, what it is to be human, and how the human spirit responds to social, political, and religious circumstances. For this installation, he considered both the practical and aesthetic experiences of the viewer. The sculpture conveys a sense of spiritual presence and prompts park visitors to contemplate the past, present, and future of sculpture in tandem with that of the park. Sitting on a vessel symbolizing the melting pot, the human figure represents a moment of serene contemplation amidst the commotion of the city.

Phyllis Hammond, Beyond the Edge
October 15, 2016 to April 16, 2017
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Hamptons-based artist Phyllis Hammond has created five new sculptures for Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, entitled Tempo, Alien, Flying, Gateway, and Sign of Freedom. Exhibited together under the title Beyond the Edge, the steel and aluminum sculptures feature narrow stem-like bases topped by whimsical, kinetic elements that rotate in the wind. Hammond uses an improvisational method to create her colorful, large-scale sculptures. The metal cutouts are based on playful, looping doodles on paper that she scans and modifies using a computer program. Once the drawings have been refined digitally, the designs are cut from sheets of metal using a water jet machine. After the metal shapes are hammered, bent and welded into curved shapes, they are powder-coated with brightly colored paint.

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Blind Idealism Is...), 2016

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Blind Idealism Is...)
March 21,2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Barbara Kruger is an American artist who works with pictures and words. Kruger uses the fluency she developed as a graphic designer for publications such Mademoiselle, House & Garden, and Aperture, to inform her work as an artist, insistently addressing the issues of power, property, money, race, and sexuality. Over the past three decades her work has ranged from the photographic merging of image and text, to immersive video installations, to room-wrapping textual exhibitions, to large-scale outdoor displays of words and images. Two of her best-known works – Your body is a battleground and I shop therefore I am – also showcase the feminist overtones of her artworks, and her concentration on women as a lucrative site for advertising and consumerism.

For the High Line, Kruger presents Untitled (Blind Idealism Is…), a new work realized as a hand-painted mural. Continuing her unabashed criticism of culture and power, the mural features the slogan “BLIND IDEALISM IS REACTIONARY SCARY DEADLY,” an adaptation of a quote from Afro-Caribbean philosopher and revolutionary thinker Frantz Fanon, which has appeared in multiple works by the artist. The original statement by Fanon, “Blind idealism is reactionary,” suggests that political and religious convictions stem from the situations from which they grow, not from the inherent nature of individual human beings. According to Kruger, the work reflects “how we are to one another” within “the days and nights that construct us.” These texts, along with Kruger’s own writings, resonate with particular potency in today’s political climate.

Dee Briggs, 6 Plates, 5' x 10' x .5

Dee Briggs, Dee Briggs in Foley Square
April 11, 2016 to March 31, 2017
Thomas Paine Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Dee Briggs’ three new sculptures for Dee Briggs in Foley Square directly address her fascination with geometry and the particular operation of symmetry called chirality or three-dimensional handedness. Chirality is defined by a three dimensional entity that has no internal plane of symmetry along the x, y or z-axis.

Briggs states that her work “grows out of mathematics and architecture – geometry, symmetry and rhythm – line, plane and volume – visual perception and spatial understanding. They are three-dimensional patterns that are at once familiar and foreign. Heavy forms that imply weightlessness creating a tempting and engaging spatial experience.”

Nari Ward, Smart Tree
April 2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inspired by a building adjacent to the High Line that had been transformed into an indoor parking lot, Nari Ward reconfigures a memory from his childhood for his High Line Commission, Smart Tree. Returning to his father’s home in Jamaica after fifteen years away, Ward remembers finding one of two abandoned cars in the front yard sprouting a lime tree. He reimagines this fantastical story for the High Line in the form of a Smart car refinished with strips of tire treads and propped up on cinder blocks. In place of a lime tree, Smart Tree will feature an apple tree growing out of its roof, adapted out of necessity for its North American context. With the car’s cinderblock base representing stasis, and its coating of tire treads suggesting perpetual movement, Ward’s Smart Tree holds up a mirror to the flux surrounding the High Line itself and reminds viewers of the High Line’s history as a major transportation artery in Manhattan.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Kathryn Andrews, Sunbathers I & II
May 2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For the High Line, Kathryn Andrews presents her first public art commission, responding to two contrasting aspects of the elevated park: its relationship to nearby billboards and to the natural landscape. Andrews describes the High Line’s environment as a “hyper-surreal image world,” composed of large-scale advertisements and commercial signs that surround park visitors as they stroll high above the bustling cityscape. Andrews notes, by contrast, that the High Line’s physical design offers visitors a chance to develop awareness of the body in relation to extreme natural weather conditions including intense winds, rain, snow, and sun.

Andrews’s first sculpture, Sunbathers I, is a towering box-like structure, silkscreened with a black-and-white stock image of a public beach sign that announces, “Beyond This Point You May Encounter Nude Sunbathers.” Installed at West 18th Street, the sculpture houses misting nozzles that spray water intermittently at passers-by. Placing this work on the High Line, where nudity is not allowed draws attention to the more risqué social mores displayed on nearby billboards. The second sculpture, Sunbathers II, installed under The Standard, High Line, is a large, horizontal aluminum box containing a giant fan and featuring a photograph of an ice cream cone. The fan’s movement is juxtaposed with the adjacent static image, mirroring the park itself.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Various Artist, Wanderlust
April 21, 2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Wanderlust is a group exhibition that explores the themes of walking, journeys, and pilgrimages. Inspired by the High Line as an ambulatory space experienced most naturally in motion, Wanderlust extends the tradition of Conceptual art wherein the act of walking served as an inspiration for many artists who explored life both in the urban context and in an ambivalent confrontation with nature.

On the High Line, itself an urban promenade that combines nature and architecture, the act of walking is both celebrated and taken for granted. Wanderlust invites viewers to remember the many implications of the journeys and walks they take every day, placing them within a secular tradition that expands beyond art into both everyday life and our shared cultural histories.

Wanderlust will feature eleven international artists: Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Valentin Carron, Iman Issa, Matt Johnson, Marie Lorenz, Tony Matelli, Paulo Nazareth, Mike Neslon, Roman Ondak, Susan Philipsz, and Rayyane Tabet.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

David Shrigley, MEMORIAL
September 8, 2016 to February 12, 2017
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

MEMORIAL is a new sculpture by David Shrigley consisting of a 17 foot tall slab of granite which has been meticulously engraved to feature an everyday grocery list. The object plays on the historical significance of granite public monuments, often erected to celebrate and remember great endeavors, but Shrigley’s universal monument pays homage both to no-one and to everyone. It honors and memorializes the small act of making a grocery list, familiar to so many–a simple ode to humanity.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund

Martin Ramone Delossantos, Little Oil Well
October 5, 2016 to January 24, 2017
Ahearn Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This work by Hoboken–based artist Martin Ramone Delossantos is an abstraction of an oil well. Consisting of a four–part lower portion made of thick steel tubes, the sculpture is topped by two bicycle wheels that give it a kinetic quality. Delossantos is a sculptor, painter, and artisan who creates whimsical sculptures out of metal and found metal objects that interact with space. His sculptures represent rhythm, feelings, and emotions. The artist hopes that this work will bring attention to the vibrant arts community in his hometown of Hoboken across the Hudson River. This is only the second exhibit ever placed in Ahearn Park, on New York’s Lower East Side.

Martin Puryear, Big Bling
May 16, 2016 to January 8, 2017
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This temporary outdoor work, the thirty–third public art exhibition mounted by Mad. Sq. Art, the free contemporary art program of Madison Square Park Conservancy, is a multi–tier wood structure wrapped in fine chain–link fence. A gold–leafed shackle is anchored near the top of the structure. At forty feet high, Big Bling achieves colossal scale and elicits a range of readings, stimulating diverse and profound interpretations of its meaning.

The largest temporary outdoor sculpture Puryear has created, Big Bling is part animal form, part abstract sculpture, and part intellectual meditation. The artist’s signature organic vocabulary appears in a graceful, sinewy outline and an amoeboid form in the work’s center. Big Bling’s architectural language suggests a building that is accessible by ascension through its levels. Its stories are obstructed by chain–link fence, a barrier to entry, which covers all visible surfaces of the sculpture. In contrast to the coarse materials employed throughout most of the work, the gold shackle is a shimmering beacon that simultaneously adorns and restrains.

This exhibition is presented by Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Audrey Shachnow, Golden Pears
August 22, 2016 to January 1, 2017
Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Audrey Shachnow makes large scale sculptures with the purpose of creating beauty in everyday objects. Her large scale installation of "Golden Pears” highlights the connection between the importance of the earth's natural environment and its ability to support the food we grow to sustain life. The Golden Pears invite a dialogue between the trees and the park setting, reminding us of the importance of preserving nature.

Evolving Terrain brings together four artists’ work, placed throughout Fort Tryon Park. The show includes work by artists Anthony Heinz May, Audrey Shachnow, Tom Monsees, and Matthias Neumann. Their work addresses the natural landscape within an ever-changing city, and hopes to create a dialogue between communities, artists, and nature, and the ways in which the natural realm supports the built environment.

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance and the Fort Tryon Park Trust.

Anthony Heinz May, Persieverrance
August 22, 2016 to January 1, 2017
Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Persieverrance is an intentionally misspelled version of the word perseverance. Containing three parts (per-sieve-errance) the word-jam sounds phonetically like perseverance, but misspelled to engage in this compositional reconstruction of natural tree waste found in the park. The title suggests processes observed in the fragmented assemblage and questions relations between nature, humans and technology. The breakdown of the recycled tree trunk into equal-sized units portrays scientific instrumentality involved in the removal of natural material from cycles that benefit all life on Earth, for human salvation and profiteering.

Evolving Terrain brings together four artists’ work, placed throughout Fort Tryon Park. The show includes work by artists Anthony Heinz May, Audrey Shachnow, Tom Monsees, and Matthias Neumann. Their work addresses the natural landscape within an ever-changing city, and hopes to create a dialogue between communities, artists, and nature, and the ways in which the natural realm supports the built environment.

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance and the Fort Tryon Park Trust.

Matthias Neumann, bench V (basics)
August 22, 2016 to January 1, 2017
Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

“bench V (basics)” is a site-specific installation that continues the artists’s “basics” series of work, exploring an abstracted notion of form, material, space and utility. “Basics” is based on a constructive logic of additive 2x4 wood studs that allow a monumentality through every-day means. The work can be experienced both as an abstract sculptural gesture and interactive spatial environment. “Basics” encourages an uncertainty in the dialog between the viewer and the work, opening possibilities in the public quality and appropriation of the work. The temporality of the site-specific intervention is mirrored by the material and constructive logic of the work.

Evolving Terrain brings together four artists’ work, placed throughout Fort Tryon Park. The show includes work by artists Anthony Heinz May, Audrey Shachnow, Tom Monsees, and Matthias Neumann. Their work addresses the natural landscape within an ever-changing city, and hopes to create a dialogue between communities, artists, and nature, and the ways in which the natural realm supports the built environment.

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance and the Fort Tryon Park Trust.

Tom Monsees, Tripod
August 22, 2016 to January 1, 2017
Fort Tryon Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

‘Tripod’ is made up of three casts of a found piece of rotting wood. It is remade in ghostly matte white in reference to death masks and a homage to the object’s prior life. The wood is elevated to a place of honor generally reserved for well known, and/or well regarded, human subjects.

Evolving Terrain brings together four artists’ work, placed throughout Fort Tryon Park. The show includes work by artists Anthony Heinz May, Audrey Shachnow, Tom Monsees, and Matthias Neumann. Their work addresses the natural landscape within an ever-changing city, and hopes to create a dialogue between communities, artists, and nature, and the ways in which the natural realm supports the built environment.

This exhibition is presented by the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance and the Fort Tryon Park Trust.

Queens

Courtesy of the artist

Jennifer Cecere, Double Doily
November 18, 2016 to November 17, 2017
PS1 Greenstreet (Jackson Avenue and 46th Avenue), Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Jennifer Cecere’s artwork aims to integrate a feeling of domestic handiwork into the built environment. Doilies were invented by industrious women to hide and protect worn and frayed furnishings (maybe feelings too). Through the variety of materials that they can be made from, the ways in which they can be displayed, and their references to a variety of subject matter makes doilies very diverse. This double–sided, doily–shaped bench enlivens this small park in the midst of a busy thoroughfare and new construction by taking something intimate and domestic and placing it outdoors. The handicraft of the bench demonstrates a familiarity with domestic materials that ties us with our fragile environment and revives traditions that when integrated with art and architecture reflect our hopes and dreams.

Meg Webster, Concave Room for Bees
May 8, 2016 to March 13, 2017
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

With robust plantings of native grasses and flowers, and herbs, Meg Webster’s Concave Room for Bees is both sculptural and ecological. Webster highlights the complex interactions of organic systems in the piece in a variety of ways, such as selecting greenery that attracts pollinators and exposing the soil layers for viewing. Park visitors are encouraged to use paths to walk through the work, experiencing it in the round. The work is multi-sensory, a mix of botanical aromas, insect hums, dewy air, and vibrantly colored flora.

This exhibition was originally part of LANDMARK, a series of artist commissions and projects that marked Socrates Sculpture Park’s 30th anniversary in 2016. The works transformed the land both physically and symbolically. LANDMARK directly addressed the idea of place as intimately tied to social and ecological structures, to maintenance and stewardship, and to evolution over time.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Various Artists, EAF16: Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition
September 25, 2016 to March 13, 2017
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inaugurated in 2000, Socrates Sculpture Park’s annual Emerging Artist Fellowship (EAF) Exhibition offers a rare opportunity for emerging artists to realize original, large-scale, complex outdoor work. The 15 selected artists are provided with an open studio along with financial, administrative, and technical support. From May through September EAF artists work on-site, negotiating the physical and conceptual challenges of production in the park’s outdoor studio space, enhancing the park’s popular summer programming. The resulting site-specific works are physically and ideologically diverse and address the past, present, and future of the park as it celebrates its 30th anniversary year.

This year’s Emerging Artist Fellows were selected through a highly competitive process by the park’s 2016 Curatorial Advisors, Larissa Harris (Curator, Queens Museum) and Amanda Hunt (Assistant Curator, Studio Museum in Harlem). The 2016 Emerging Artist Fellows are: Liene Bosquê, Travis Boyer, Andrew Brehm, Lea Cetera, Dachal Choi and Mathew Suen, Onyedika Chuke, Galería Perdida, Dylan Gauthier, Dmitri Hertz, Madeline Hollander, Olalekan Jeyifous, Lia Lowenthal, Sable Elyse Smith, Elizabeth Tubergen, and Bryan Zanisnik.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Lisa Oppenheim, Broadway Billboard: APPLAUSE
September 25, 2016 to March 12, 2017
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For her Broadway Billboard, APPLAUSE, Oppenheim creates the vision of a “truly” blue rose by digitally shifting color tones of a stock photograph. This work evolves from the artist’s ongoing study of color and perception, focusing on the impossibility of a “natural” blue rose. Through research Oppenheim learned that blue roses cannot occur without human intervention. For centuries blue roses were created by adding blue dye to white roses, but in 2004 a Japanese company produced a blue rose through genetic engineering.

Appropriately, folklore of various cultures often use the blue rose as symbols of the impossible or unattainable. In tales and poetry, it has also represented unrequited love, blinding phantasm, and deceptive illusion. Now situated in the leafy landscape and post-industrial neighborhood at Socrates Sculpture Park, it takes on an enigmatic tone. As genetic modification organisms are currently hotly debated—both championed as a solution to global hunger and derided as potentially toxic agents–are these blue roses ominous or gloriousΑ

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Hou de Souza, FOLLY: Sticks
July 9, 2016 to December 31, 2016
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This year’s winning proposal for Folly, an annual juried competition for architects and designers, comes from the New York City-based firm Hou de Sousa, with their inventive proposal Sticks. Modeled to fit and complement existing site conditions, Sticks is a simple assembly of standard dimensional lumber interconnected to form a structural frame for educational and community use, as well as for providing art and material storage and display space. Its porous façade reflects the park’s spirit of accessibility and dedication to transparency of process.

Hou de Sousa’s proposal was selected from submissions from around the world and reviewed by a jury of five esteemed architects and artists. In past years, the Folly program has investigated the intersection between sculpture and architecture through the conceptual framework of “follies”—temporary structures that intentionally served no utilitarian purpose. Marking the program’s fifth and the park’s thirtieth anniversaries, Folly 2016 marks a departure from previous years’ competitions by asking entrants to design a functional structure to enhance the park’s public programs. The result is a durable design that explores the relationship between art and architecture, while also creatively enhancing the park’s education studio, where more than 10,000 students annually participate in art-making classes.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park and The Architectural League of New York.

Staten Island

Susan Stair, Tree Reflections
October 15, 2016 to October 14, 2017
Conference House Park, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Tree Reflections is a series of clay tiles cast from two Osage Orange trees combined with mosaic pieces that tells the story of two parks. The main components of this artwork are cast from an Osage Orange tree in Marcus Garvey Park near the artist’s home in Harlem. After visiting Conference House Park, Stair cast four clay extensions from the Osage Orange tree there, which were added to the existing artwork. Stair’s aims to create portraits of trees through her work. The clay that she presses onto living trees records their species, age, and strength. She was particularly attracted to the trees’ remarkable patterns, bending forms, and endurance, physical qualities that demonstrate the unique historical importance of this species.

An additional exhibition of Stair’s work in the Conference House Park Visitor Center’s Lenape Gallery will open on November 25 as part of Native American Heritage month.

Was this information helpful?