Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks bringsto the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse ourlist of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or readmore about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Current Exhibits

Bronx

Image: Together, Athanatos-for ever , Courtesy of the artist.

Vincent Parisot, Together, Athanatos-for ever
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Jardin De Las Rosas, Bronx, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Vincent Parisot is a Greece based artist who has exhibited worldwide. One of the works that has resulted from their home and its flora is Athanatos-for ever, a veritable wall painting. It represents an “agave americana,” which in Greece is called “Athanatos,” or “without end,” an allusion to its longevity. Often, there are hearts on its leaves, along with names of young couples who hope that the plant’s longevity will be transmitted to their love.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image: Celebrations, Courtesy of the artist.

Lady K Fever, Celebrations
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Jackson Forestâ??s Community Garden, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This mural is inspired by conversations with the garden’s founder about the history of the garden and plans for its future. On one side of the shed, silhouettes of a group of people clapping and celebrating, with reflections of the garden painted within the group’s outline. Other images incorporated into the design include a pumpkin patch, a flower bed, the garden’s pathway, an early morning scene, native butterflies, oversized flowers, and an array of green leaves and foliage.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Brooklyn

Image: Together, We Will Grow, Courtesy of the artist.

ArtisticAfro, Together, We Will Grow
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Eden’s Community Garden, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This mural’s inspiring design invites neighborhood children to want to learn about the benefits of growing their own food. Through that bond with gardening, the hope is that the garden will eventually become their safe space. Natural elements are matched with the garden's motto "Together, we will grow." The front of the shed carries this similar theme with an image of someone's hands holding a potted plant with a seedling inside. Through loving, nurturing, and growing plants, you love, nurture, and grow yourself.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image Courtesy of the Artist.

Leonard Ursachi, Bunker Head
October 10, 2019 to October 9, 2020
University Place, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Romanian artist Leonard Ursachi’s “Bunker Head” is a large, stylized human head – evocative of bunker embrasures- covered in stainless steel mirrors. .The sculpture “bandaged” in gauze, evokes not only the wounded, but also the healing. The highly stylized nature of its “face” will reference iconic heads from countless cultures, from shaman to soldier, from poet to prophet. The artist carved the sculpture in rigid foam and covered it with Styrocrete, a cement-like material that is used on top of foam in building construction. The “openings” will be shallow recesses covered with stainless steel mirrors.

Image Credit: Evan Rossell and Dee Rosse, Tune Squad Court, Photo by Travel Creative.

Evan Rossell and Dee Rosse, Tune Squad Court
August 1, 2019 to July 31, 2020
Rodney Playground North, Brooklyn
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Description:
The mural features beloved Looney Tunes characters: Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Sylvester, Tweety, and Taz. This exhibition is presented by Warner Brothers.

Image credit: Image courtesy of the artist

Bill Soltis, Under the Sun
August 27, 2019 to July 31, 2020
Greenstreet on Flatbush Avenue between 7th Avenue and Park Place, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Under the Sun is one of a series of sculptures by Brooklyn-based artist Bill Soltis about experimentation with the human form, positive and negative relationships and the interplay between the figure and a sculptural environment. The final piece is a marriage of these elements and the environment in which the sculpture rests. In his art, Soltis experiments with shapes, images, patterns, and lines, allowing the construction process to create the idea, rather than forcing a completely formed idea into becoming an object. As a subject, the human figure lends itself well to this open process. It can be left representational or made abstract. Its form can be smooth, angular, sharp, or curved, with active, passive, or emotive gestures. He often works with welded metal due to its versatility, permanence, and strength and ability to survive indoor, outdoors, in gardens, or urban settings equally well.

This exhibition is presented in partnership with North Flatbush Business Improvement District.

Manhattan

Image courtesy of the artist

Manuel Ferreiro Badia, Compostela Fractal Study of a Shell
February 3, 2020 to February 2, 2021
Finn Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
The sculpture Compostela Fractal Study of a Shell is based on origami studies and is composed of broken steel planes that cause the sculpture to change or live with sunlight. It reflects in an abstract way the fractal system of matter, looking for a simplicity that reflects the interior of every being. It is a work inspired in the study of the nature, in particular of a shell: the volume is reduced to its fractal structure, to its geometry.

Image: Flora_Interpretations, Courtesy of the artist.

Rose & Mike DeSiano, Flora_Interpretations
October 1, 2019 to October 31, 2020
Clinton Community Garden, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
This mural is inspired by two native New Yorkers, and members of several community gardens, who understand the value of green space in a big city. The artists invited local residents to the garden to take photos during a guided tour. The images were transformed in to a wall covering mural and was installed with their help. The mural reflects the beauty of this local garden that is possible through the hard work of the volunteers.

This project is part of NYC Parks GreenThumb’s Art in the Gardens - Shed Murals project, an initiative that provides local artists with the opportunity to collaborate with community gardens as a platform to create and display their art.

Image credit: Simone Leigh, Brick House, photo by Timothy Schenck, courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Simone Leigh, Brick House
June 5, 2019 to September 30, 2020
The High Line, Manhattan
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Description:

For the inaugural High Line Plinth commission, Simone Leigh presents Brick House, a sixteen-foot-tall bronze bust of a Black woman. The torso is a combination of the forms of a skirt and a clay house. The figure stands tall and monumental atop the Plinth, gazing resolutely down 10th Avenue.  Brick House is the first monumental work in Anatomy of Architecture, Leigh’s continuing series of sculptures that combine architectural forms from regions as varied as West Africa and the American South with the human body. The sculpture references numerous architectural forms: Batammaliba architecture from Benin and Togo; the teleuk of the Mousgoum people of Cameroon and Chad; and the restaurant Mammy’s Cupboard in the southern U.S. All three references inform both the formal elements of the work—the conflated image of woman and architecture—and its conceptual framework.

Leigh’s Brick House will be centered on the Spur, standing in sharp contrast to the disparate elements of the immediate architectural landscape. The Plinth is the focal point of the Spur, a site whose architectural and human scales are in constant vertiginous negotiation, surrounded by a competitive landscape of glass-and-steel towers shooting up from among older industrial-era brick buildings. In this space, Leigh’s magnificent Black female figure challenges visitors to think more immediately about the architecture around them, and how it reflects customs, values, priorities, and society as a whole.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line . 

Image caption: Chloë Bass, Wayfinding, 2019. Photo: SaVonne Anderson

Chloë Bass, Chloë Bass: Wayfinding
September 28, 2019 to September 27, 2020
St. Nicholas Park, Manhattan
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Description:

The Studio Museum in Harlem presents Chloë Bass: Wayfinding, the conceptual artist’s first institutional solo exhibition. This monumental commission features twenty-four site-specific sculptures that gesture toward the structural and visual vernacular of public wayfinding signage. The exhibition begins with and revolves around three central questions, poetically penned by the artist and featured throughout the park in billboard form: How much of care is patience? How much of life is coping? How much of love is attention? Through a combination of text and archival images, Bass’s sculptures activate an eloquent exploration of language, both visual and written, encouraging moments of private reflection in public space.

This exhibition is presented by the Studio Musem in Harlem.

Image courtesy of JACOBSCHANG Architecture

JACOBSCHANG Architecture, El Barrio Bait Station
September 17, 2019 to September 16, 2020
East River Esplanade, Manhattan

Description:

The El Barrio Bait Station melds art, function and community by providing a useful working bait station for the local anglers, and by bringing innovative design to a waterfront in need of investment and reinvention. Not only a necessary amenity for the fishermen that line the edges of the East River day and night during the fishing seasons, the project will also serve as a catalyst for activating the neglected stretch of the river. The sculptural kiosk serves as a place to cut bait, or gut and prepare fish that are caught in addition to providing additional lighting, orientation, and educational information about fishing in the area. The bait station also includes a helpful illustration by Clarisa Diaz depicting the fish of the East River, provided courtesy of Gothamist/WNYC.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the East River Esplanade (60th-120th Streets) and JACOBSCHANG Architecture with funding provided by NYS Sea Grant.

Image credit: Photo by Nicholas Knight, courtesy of Public Art Fund

Jean-Marie Appriou, The Horses
September 11, 2019 to August 30, 2020
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
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Description:
Jean-Marie Appriou’s massive equine sculptures stand like surreal sentinels at the entrance to Central Park. The artist was inspired by the horses nearby who pull tourists in carriages through the city and by Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s gilded monument of William Tecumseh Sherman on horseback just opposite this site at Grand Army Plaza. However, Appriou’s sculptures poetically reimagine the species. The artist carved clay and foam models to cast in aluminum, emphasizing the tool marks and fingerprints of his tactile process. The works’ jagged textures and silvery surfaces create a dynamic play of light and shadow as we move around them, emphasizing the hallucinatory qualities of their composition and imbuing them with a dreamlike energy.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Image Courtesy of the NYC  Parks.

Rubem Robierb, Dream Machine: Dandara
November 4, 2019 to August 30, 2020
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
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Description:
Brazilian artist Rubem Robierb has become internationally for his uplifting sculptures of oversized, stylized wings. Designed for public interaction, Dream Machine: Dandara has a space between the two 10-foot high, pearl white fiberglass wings for viewers to place themselves. Robierb’s Dream Machine sculptures are named after someone forgotten or famous who lived or died fighting for their own dreams, or for the dreams of others. This sculpture, the newest in this series, is named Dandara in memory of a transgender woman who was brutally attacked and murdered in Brazil in 2017. Dream Machine: Dandara is dedicated to the transgender/gender non-conforming community. 

This exhibition is presented by Taglialatella Galleries.

Image credit: courtesy of Six Summit Gallery

Ailene Fields, Once Upon a Time and The Frog Prince
December 7, 2019 to August 24, 2020
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
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Description:

Fascinated since childhood by ancient Greek and Roman mythology, Ailene Fields had these stories and characters form the core of her early bronze sculptures. Taking harsh materials such as bronze and stone and transforming them into gentle characters is a major goal for the artist. It is a process of finding what has been trapped within since time immemorial and allowing it to reveal itself to the world. Her sculptures in Dag Hammarskjold embody whimsy and playfulness in the form of a fairy perched on a branch and a larger-than-life frog prince.

This exhibition is presented by Six Summit Gallery.

Images courtesy of Harlem Needle Arts

Nacinimod Deodee, A Long Walk to Freedom and Reflection
December 7, 2019 to August 15, 2020
Colonel Charles Young Triangle, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Nacinimod Deodee has created a colorful three-part public art exhibition in this small triangular park, with the aim to activate the park during the cold winter months and compliment the arrival of warmer weather in the spring. A Long Walk to Freedom is a fence installation measuring 100 feet in length and runs along Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard. The horizontal, abstract composition is bookended by the numbers 1619 which refers to the year when American slavery began, and an infinity symbol. The artist has also created colorful yarn installations for the park’s lampposts and benches to make the space more inviting. This installation is part of Harlem Needle Arts’ larger We the People | Disrupting Silence textile series and public art initiative honoring African Diasporic peoples past and present.

This project is presented by Harlem Needle Arts.

Image courtesy of Marcus Garvey Park Alliance

Susan Stair, Roots on Fire
August 18, 2019 to August 1, 2020
Harlem Art Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Representing trees spreading roots and symbolizing stability, Roots on Fire is a two-dimensional installation situated on the lattice fence in Harlem Art Park. Within the roots and trunk of the tree, unfurling flags represent a call to preserve the cultural heritage of the diverse ethnic groups that have come to live together in East Harlem over the past 150 yearsRoots on Fire is an invitation to celebrate the East Harlem’s continuous growth and strength, extending to outsiders and newcomers to learn about the cultural forbearers of a historically immigrant community. 

Roots on Fire is made possible in part with funding from the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone Development Corporation and administered by LMCC. Additional funding provided by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance with support from the Harlem Community Development Corporation and the Durst Organization.

Image credit: courtesy of Six Summit Gallery

Ailene Fields and Gina Miccinilli, Fantastic Creatures
October 28, 2019 to July 30, 2020
Bella Abzug Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
Fascinated since childhood by ancient Greek and Roman mythology, Ailene Fields uses these stories and characters to form the core of her early bronze sculptures. Taking harsh materials such as bronze and stone and transforming them into gentle characters is a major goal for the artist. It is a process of finding what has been trapped within since time immemorial and allowing it to reveal itself to the world. Her five sculptures on view in this park range from Poseidon, the Greek god of the sea, to a benevolent dragon. Field’s sculptures are accompanied by a monumentally sized sculpture of a cicada by Gina Miccinilli.

Queens

Photo: courtesy of RPGA Studio, Inc.

Yvonne Shortt with Jenna Boldebuck, Mayuko Fujino and Joel Esquite, Rigged
July 10, 2019 to July 9, 2020
MacDonald Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Rigged is a visual commentary on our social, political, and economic systems. It asks viewers to investigate such systems with the installation’s series rabbits and carrots placed on a 3-dimensional maze. The maze has windows that provide a glimpse inside the maze structure, along with a series of staircases that lead from one level to the next, yet there is no perceptible entrance or exit point. The maze was designed by the arts non-profit RPGA Studio, Inc., and the community was invited to design the rabbit/carrot sculptures.

This exhibition is presented by RPGA Studio, Inc. and Friends of MacDonald Park.

Staten Island

Lina Montoya, The Immigrant Journey -- Past Meets Present (Mural)
October 8, 2019 to October 7, 2020
Arrochar Playground, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

This mural, depicting waves, mountains and stars, is a companion artwork to the  expansive fence installation above it. Together, the mural and the fence installation are a tribute to the immigrant communities of all times and an homage to New York Harbor. The fence installation is the result of a Residency Program with artist Lina Montoya and Sundog Theatre at P.S 39, a public school directly adjacent to this playground. The residency’s theme was cultural immigration and Ellis Island history, and the resulting design was inspired by the Staten Island Ferry and the boats that came to Ellis Island full of people.

Supported by Council Member Steven Matteo through the Cultural Immigrant Initiative grant awarded to Sundog Theatre, Inc. for artist Lina Montoya and PS 39 students.

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