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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Celebrating 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Join us in celebrating the 50th anniversary of our Art in the Parks program! Visit more than 50 public artworks currently on view in our parks, and celebrate with us at our upcoming anniversary events!

Celebrate 50 Years of Art in the Parks

Public Art Map and Guide

Find out which current exhibits are on display near you, and browse our permanent monument collection.

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Current Exhibits

Citywide

Talking Statues
July 12, 2017 to January 12, 2018
Various Locations

Description:

Talking Statues brings together internationally acclaimed authors and actors to give voice to carefully selected statues worldwide. Started in Copenhagen, Denmark in 2013 by documentary filmmaker David Peter Fox, the project has since expanded to Helsinki, London, San Diego, Berlin, and Chicago. The New York installation of this project will feature 35 monuments throughout the city’s five boroughs that share stories via smartphones. Signs printed with QR codes will be posted near the participating statues, which will prompt the statue to “call” the visitor. The monuments will “speak” 18 different languages and represent more than 20 nations.

Participating statues can be found in Columbus Park, Continental Army Plaza and Steeplechase Park in Brooklyn; D’Auria-Murphy Triangle in the Bronx; The Battery, Bryant Park, Central Park, Kimlau Square, Riverside Park, Stuyvesant Square and Union Square Park in Manhattan; Athens Square, Columbus Square and Flushing Meadows Corona Park in Queens; and Tompkinsville Park in Staten Island. For a full list and map, please visit www.newyorktalkingstatues.com.

LeAp, A View from the Lunchroom: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
June 1, 2017 to August 31, 2017
Various Locations

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program included visits with distinguished artists George Boorujy, Christo, Nancy Chunn, Maia Cruz Palileo, Daze, Julie Heffernan, Stephen Powers, Risa Puno, Andre Rubin, and Federico Solmi. Since 1977, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts-based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August in Claremont Park and Crotona Park in the Bronx, Bensonhurst Park and Sternberg Park in Brooklyn, Riverside Park and Captain Jacob Joseph Playground in Manhattan, Benninger Park and Forest Park in Queens, and Clove Lakes Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.
This exhibition is presented by LEAP.

Bronx

Patricia Cazorla and Nancy Saleme, Flying High for Equality
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Joyce Kilmer Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inspired by American novelist Richard Bach’s bestseller Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Patricia Cazorla and Nancy Saleme use oversized, colorful sculptures of the city’s sparrows as a metaphor for the search for equality. Sparrows are creatures of resilience, audacity, intelligence, and beauty that mirror many of the qualities of New York City’s communities.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Lovie Pignata, Daylighting
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Virginia Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Lovie Pignata activates a blacktop with a bold, painted replica of the nearby Bronx River, highlighting the importance of this waterway. She has also installed retired canoes from local non-profits, which will be retrofitted with seating, chessboards, planters, and wayfinding signage.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Courtesy of Mary Mattingly

Mary Mattingly, Swale
July 2017 to August 2017
Concrete Plant Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Swale is a floating food forest built atop a barge that travels to piers in New York City, offering educational programming and welcoming visitors to harvest herbs, fruits and vegetables for free. Swale strives to strengthen stewardship of public waterways and land, while working to shift policies that will increase the presence of edible perennial landscapes.

In the summer of 2016, Swale launched at Concrete Plant Park in the South Bronx, one of the largest food deserts in the United States. Food deserts are a reality in many communities in New York City; as many as three million New Yorkers live in communities with limited access to places where they can get fresh produce. Swale began as an idea to advocate for food to be grown on some of the 30,000 acres of public land in New York City, through urban stewardship initiatives led by community partners in the South Bronx.

For more information about programming, hours, and Swale’s current location please visit http://www.swaleny.org/.

Diana Perea, Bronx Tracks
July 2016 to July 2017
Railroad Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Created by Bronx artist Diana Perea, the Bronx Tracks was inspired by French muralist Nelio as well as the unique sounds, movement and cityscape of the Bronx. The mural is a site-specific installation designed to activate the park and to create a more pedestrian-friendly experience along E. 161st Street between the bustling courthouse center at Morris Avenue and the less trafficked three-block stretch to Elton Avenue. A team of young DreamYard artists and an intergenerational team of community volunteers installed the mural, spurring conversation, creativity, and a new favorite destination among community members and groups.

The mural’s abstract forms and vibrant colors reenergize Railroad Park, the adjacent NYCHA Morrisania Air Rights building, and the path to the often-overlooked Metro North Station directly behind it. Perea’s innovative techniques emphasize the beauty of the existing structures, and the mural’s influences by Picasso, Delaunay, Kandinsky, and Malevich can be admired by all who play in and pass by Railroad Park and E. 161st Street.

This exhibit is presented by WHEDco and The DreamYard Project in partnership with the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA).

Brooklyn

Deborah Kass, OY/YO
July 11, 2017 to July 10, 2018
North 5th Street Pier and Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Walking the line between respectful homage and brazen appropriation, Brooklyn-based artist Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of iconic 20th century, often with a feminist twist. OY/YO is sourced from urban and Brooklyn slang, the statement “I am” in Spanish, and the popular Yiddish expression. OY/YO has been a significant and reoccurring motif in Kass’ work since its first appearance in 2011, taking form in paintings, prints, and tabletop sculptures. In a provocative gesture, OY/YO, measuring 8 x 17 x 5 ft and painted bright yellow on aluminum along the Williamsburg waterfront, is visible from Manhattan’s skyscrapers including the Empire State Building.

This exhibition is presented by Paul Kasmin Gallery and Douglaston Development.

Blythe Cain, Circadia
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Circadia is an interactive luminescent sculpture and seating system made from concrete and glow-sand, which will act as a guide to the park entrance. Resembling a historic building foundation, Circadia also mimics the park’s rolling hills and natural rhythms found in nature.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Musa Hixson, The Conversation Sculpture
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Herbert Von King Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Musa Hixson’s steel sculpture includes several stools enclosed within a flower-shaped frame, which provide a space for intimate conversation in the public park. The sculpture’s horticultural form references the park’s mature landscape.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Image courtesy of Liz Sales

Jane Manus, Danielle
June 12, 2017 to June 11, 2018
Dr. Ronald McNair Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Jane Manus’ strongly geometric aluminum sculptures, personally welded by hand, draw their primary inspiration from the angularity and structure of architecture. With the play of its cheery, vibrant yellow paint and a dynamic use of negative space, Danielle transforms its surroundings and inspires an interactive viewing experience. The sculpture’s angular lines and joyful hue spring forth from the green lawns and trees surrounding it.

Image courtesy of the Fort Greene Park Conservancy

Amanda Patenaude, One Map of Many Moments
July 3, 2017 to May 25, 2018
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

One Map of Many Moments is an artist led, community generated project that transforms trash into inspiring public art by turning hundreds of broken glass shards collected from Fort Greene Park into a mosaic map of the park. Drawings from park visitors depicting everything from historic figures of Fort Greene to the current day activities and horticultural wonders of the grounds are sprinkled throughout the map. Each piece of the larger whole offers a contemplative view of our neighborhood’s waste and deep dedication to our park and highlights the role of community in preserving urban green spaces.

This exhibition is presented by the Fort Greene Park Conservancy.

Image courtesy of El Puente Bushwick Leadership Center

Jordan Morales, Hamairi Alvarez and Jordy Victor, Enlightenment, Unity and Freedom
June 17, 2017 to November 20, 2017
Hope Ballfield, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

During the school year, artist Raul Ayala worked with three students at El Puente to create a series of three designs based on the themes of freedom and community empowerment. These designs are then cut into different geometric shapes on plywood, and hung from chain link fence. El Puente has been a force in Bushwick for the last 25 years developing powerful youth leaders through its El Puente Bushwick Leadership Center. For the past four years, El Puente has been leading the transformation of Hope Ballfield for the community.

This exhibition is presented by El Puente Bushwick Leadership Center.

Image courtesy of the artist

William Soltis, Divergence
July 18, 2017 to October 31, 2017
Cuyler Gore Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Divergence is a sculpture about experimentation with the human form, positive and negative relationships, and the interplay between the figure and a sculptural environment. In his art, William Soltis experiments with shapes, images, patterns, and lines, allowing the construction process to create the idea, rather than forcing a completely formed idea into becoming an object. As a subject, the human figure lends itself well to this open process. It can be left representational or made abstract. Its form can be smooth, angular, sharp, or curved, with active, passive, or emotive gestures. He often works with welded metal due to its versatility, permanence, and strength and ability to survive indoor, outdoors, in gardens, or urban settings equally well.

Nancy Borowick, The Family Imprint
June 10, 2017 to October 2, 2017
At Washington and Prospect Streets
Anchorage Plaza, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Family Imprint is an intimate story of family, as the humanitarian photographer Nancy Borowick’s parents underwent parallel treatments for stage-four cancer. The story is about life and love more than cancer and death. In a sense, it reads and feels like a scrapbook—and is filled with decades of saved loved letters, keepsakes and other clues about her family members’ lives, enriching the larger story which she had been photographing for a few years already. The project, which was formally known as Cancer Family Ongoing, was published nationally and internationally, has received international awards and recognition, most recently a World Press Photo award in 2016. Here, Borowick’s images are reproduced on vinyl banners. While deeply personal, this work touches all who pass by it in this public space.

This exhibition is presented by United Photo Industries and the DUMBO BID.

Cecile Chong, EL DORADO - The New Forty-Niners
June 24, 2017 to September 24, 2017
Sunset Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Cecile Chong’s installation is based on the myth of the lost treasure of El Dorado. Over the centuries the story has been told in many ways, often as a metaphor for an ultimate prize that one might spend a lifetime seeking. In this updated version of the story, El Dorado is discovered in Sunset Park as a contemporary archeological site. This installation promotes ideas of transformation, immigration and community. It honors the opportunities that this city offers to newcomers, but most of all, it acknowledges the labor and efforts that immigrants contribute in return.

This installation consists of 100 metallic-colored sculptures scattered within a fenced-in triangle near the northwest corner of the park, close to the entrance on 5th Avenue at 41st Street. The sculptures are modeled after tightly swaddled babies, or “guaguas,” that the artist saw while living in Ecuador. Forty-nine sculptures will be gold, referring to the 49% of New Yorkers who speak a language other than English at home.

Image courtesy of Public Art Fund

Anish Kapoor, Descension
May 3, 2017 to September 10, 2017
Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

As part of its 40th Anniversary season, Public Art Fund brings Descension, one of Anish Kapoor’s most viscerally arresting installations, to New York City for the first time. Sited at Pier 1 in Brooklyn Bridge Park, this massive, continuously spiraling funnel of water will harness one of the most evanescent of materials and create a striking contrast with the adjacent East River. Kapoor, among the most influential artists of his generation, has had a career-long engagement with space and the limits of perception. With Descension, he has created a dynamic negative space that descends into the ground, disturbing the familiar boundaries of our world. In the midst of a quintessential New York park, Kapoor invites us to experience the sheer perceptual wonder of an ordinary material like water made to behave in an extraordinary way.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund and Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Photo credit Jacob Farber

Jacob Farber, Rene
August 22, 2016 to August 13, 2017
Valentino Pier, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

René is comprised of scrap wood found in nearby Gowanus, Brooklyn. The sculpture speaks to the community members and organizations that are being forgotten as neighborhoods develop. This work enhances the conversations related to sustainability and usefulness as they apply to Brooklyn, but also other communities where residents, businesses, and artists have been forced out by neighborhood change. Farber hopes that this work will serve as a reminder that communities can come together and find a sustainable way in which to move forward. The name of the sculpture relates to the theme of again finding a voice, being found, and–through cooperation and collaboration–being reborn

Manhattan

Image courtesy of Hudson Square Connection

Various Artists, Hudson Square: Through Our Eyes
July 12, 2017 to July 11, 2018
Spring Street Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Consisting of photographs taken in the neighborhood around Spring Street Park, this exhibition features the work of students from Chelsea Career & Technical Education High School. Magic Box Productions teaching artist Jon Appel and visiting artist Martin Crook worked closely with the senior students as a photography, documentary team on this project. Magic Box Productions addresses the growing need for exemplary media arts education in New York City’s public K-12 schools, particularly those serving disadvantaged students with limited access to art and technology. The images capture the unique aspects of history, commerce, architecture and other features of the Hudson Square neighborhood.

This exhibition is presented by Hudson Square Connection and Magic Box Productions.

Naomi Lawrence, Magnolia
June 21, 2017 to June 20, 2018
Anibal Aviles Playground, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Through her colorfully crocheted, intensively worked, and oversized flowers, Naomi Lawrence believes that small artistic gestures can lead people into a new imagination about their home environment. She uses ubiquitous chain-link fences to frame color and texture in surprising ways, creating interaction between fiber, color, fence, sidewalk, and passing pedestrians and validating under-recognized and unappreciated corners of neighborhoods. At Anibal Aviles Playground, she created a giant magnolia–a seasonal Parks flower–which was installed in June, with a hibiscus tree to be installed in September, following a series of community workshops to make the leaves.

Cheryl Wing-Zi Wong, Constellation
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Seward Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Constellation is an architectural sculpture, performance, and panel series that activates the underused plaza in Seward Park as a transformative community public space. The site-specific sculptural pavilion is composed of interlocked wooden modules that will be re-arranged and transformed seasonally in three different configurations over the course of the exhibition.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Capucine Bourcart, LINOUQ
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Thomas Jefferson Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

From 2008 to 2012, Capucine Bourcart walked every street in Manhattan, from State Street to 220th Street, taking photographic details of walls along her route. This collection of photographs is used to create a photo-assemblage made of 4,170 metal squares that hang from a chain link fence in a design inspired by those of Native Americans’, the island’s first inhabitants.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Installation view of Darren Bader, such are promises, 2016. On view January 21 – February 20, 2016 at Sadie Coles HQ, London. Courtesy of the artist and Sadie Coles HQ

Darren Bader, chess: relatives
May 6, 2017 to April 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Located on the High Line at 13th Street, New York-based artist Darren Bader’s chess: relatives consists of a large-scale chessboard designed by the artist. Visitors are invited to take part in chess games during open park hours in which they take the place of chess pieces, their positions determined by their familial relationships to others. In order to play, visitors bring a group of 32 people together, who will be “played” by two additional people. Visitors are encouraged to assemble teams with their own friends or family, or to branch out and recruit strangers also visiting the High Line. Referring to the onsite instructions, the group self-organizes according to chess: relatives rules.

Once the group is organized into the pieces they fit into, the two players play the game, moving the human “pieces” as in a standard game of chess. Once the game begins, the players are no longer allowed to ask for clarification on what kind of piece each person represents. As one of the most interactive artworks exhibited on the High Line, chess: relatives will spark new connections, conversations, and debate amongst visitors. The piece also gives visitors the chance to become a part of an artwork that aims to ask more questions about art than it can answer.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Rendering Courtesy of the artist, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo, and Friends of the High Line. ©Henry Taylor

Henry Taylor, the floaters
March 17, 2017 to March 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Henry Taylor is a painter known for his intimate depictions of people, capturing a wide range of subjects that span from his close friends and family, to strangers whose appearances strike him, to celebrities within the African American community. His color–blocked compositions evoke compassion and a sense of shared space, setting the viewer in close conversation with those pictured.

For the High Line, Taylor presents a new version of a self-portrait adapted specifically for its setting on the side of a building at West 22nd Street. The work depicts the artist and a friend “blissed out,” relaxing in a swimming pool at a friend’s house in Palm Springs. Reminiscent of David Hockney’s paintings of Los Angeles swimming pools from the 1960s, the floaters, a title which references the eponymous Detroit R&B group, portrays the artist in a moment of pure, leisurely happiness.

This exhibition is presented by High Line Art.

Dora Budor, The Forecast (New York Situation), 2017. Part of Mutations, a High Line Commission. On view April 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Mutations
April 20, 2017 to March 31, 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Mutations is an open-air group exhibition that explores the relationship between man and nature, looking at how the boundaries between the natural world and culture are defined, crossed, and obliterated. The exhibition is inspired by the High Line as a controlled environment that encapsulates, on the one hand, the modern dream of humans taming nature, and on the other, the promise of nature reclaiming its control.

Artists who are part of this exhibition include Larry Bamburg, Alisa Baremboym, Sascha Bruanig, Dora Budor, Radamés Juni Figueroa, Guan Xiao, Marguerite Humeau, Veit Laurent Kurz, Joanna Malinowska, Jumana Manna, Jon Rafman, and Max Hooper Schneider.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape from Gravity, 2017. On view June 2017 – March 2018. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity
June 2017 to March 2018
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For over 50 years, American artist Sheila Hicks has redefined the boundaries of fiber as a medium, creating a distinctive body of work that falls between the fields of fine art, craft, design, and architecture. For her High Line Commission, Hicks draws inspiration from the many kinetic elements that dance around the High Line: the ballet of construction vehicles at the Rail Yards; the multitudinous interwoven layers of construction mesh that cover buildings, scaffolding, and streetscapes; unfinished architectural lattices; and lace of hanging crane cables. Her vibrant installation comprised of twisting tubes of various types of colored fiber will crawl along the rails at the Western Rail Yards, surprising and delighting passersby.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Leonard Ursachi, What a Wonderful World
June 26, 2017 to December 15, 2017
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Romanian artist Leonard Ursachi’s “What a Wonderful World” is a large, egg-shaped sculpture woven from branches, on which a world map has been sketched with pigmented cement. It has two recessed embrasures, each inset with a stainless steel mirror. The form and woven branches evoke nests, birth, history, and nature, while the map may be read as humanity’s trace. The title can be interpreted as ironic, cautionary, or celebratory, depending on the viewer’s perspective. Ursachi’s art often addresses the impact of people and their governments on the earth, in addition to examining the impact of borders on individuals and societies.

Photo by Toby Tenenbaum, courtesy of Randallâ??s Island Parks Alliance

Rose DeSiano, Island of Empirical Data and Other Fabrications, FLOW.17
May 6, 2017 to November 30, 2017
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Rose DeSiano’s Island of Empirical Data and Other Fabrications uses historical records, statistical data, photo archives and government documents - data points portraying a web of American values and struggles - to explore the complexity and reflexivity of culturally-constructed histories. Focusing on Randall’s Island Park as a microcosm of urban planning and transformation, DeSiano will photograph buildings, sites, and landmarks representing this data, mining the city’s archives to fill in gaps.

Welcoming park visitors at the touchdowns of crossings from East Harlem and the South Bronx, each series will comprise a multi-paneled, oversized photographic predella, visualizing the Island’s historical and socioeconomic data. The predella structure will reference Northern Renaissance altarpieces, elaborately-painted panels using Biblical characters to display challenges facing kingdoms. DeSiano’s panels will loom over Park visitors, extending the periphery and enveloping them within the city’s history of challenges and triumphs; at the same time, their own images will be reflected and superimposed upon the scene, in turn updating the archival images within modern-day Randall’s Island Park.

FLOW.17 is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance and The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

Joy Brown, Joy Brown on Broadway
May 17, 2017 to November 17, 2017
Broadway Malls from 72nd Street to 166th Street
Broadway Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Broadway Mall Association celebrates its 30th anniversary with Joy Brown on Broadway, a sculpture exhibition of nine bronze works on the green malls at the center of Broadway from 72nd Street to 166th Street. The exhibition is the 10th sculpture show that the Broadway Mall Association has presented on the malls since 2005. Brown’s rounded forms and use of bronze convey the heavy gravity of stone. The playful expressions and gestures of her figures transcend that weight, suggesting warmth and lightness of being. Simplicity of form and earth-toned patina evoke a feeling of stillness and peace. The influence of the Japanese aesthetic on Brown’s sculpture springs from her childhood in Japan and apprenticeship in traditional Japanese ceramics.

This exhibition is presented by Broadway Mall Association and Morrison Gallery.

KAWS, New York Made: Stanton Street Courts, photo courtesy of Nike

KAWS, New York Made: Stanton Street Courts
November 17, 2016 to November 16, 2017
Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

New York Made: Stanton Street Courts by KAWS encompass two side-by-side full basketball courts (approximately 116 by 80 feet), as well as four hoops. “My approach to the courts was very similar to how I would work on canvas. I wanted to create something that was true to my language, but also considerate of this being a court that people are playing on,” the Brooklyn–based, world–renowned artist Brian Donnelly (KAWS) explains. “I wanted to find the sweet spot where it works visually and functionally – how its broken up by the game’s lines and works with my images. It will have an intimate effect on the players that use the court.”

KAWS first moved to Manhattan in 1996, and lived on the corner of Clinton and Stanton Street. His familiarity with the park and its neighborhood is thus extremely personal.

This exhibition is presented with Nike.

William Logan, Flame
May 15, 2017 to November 15, 2017
Tramway Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

With a background in architecture and design, William Logan has focused on large scale public sculpture for the past 15 years. Drawing and model-making have been constant endeavors while his experience in engineering and boat-building has given him an intuitive feel for structure. Flame is the result of experimental work with carbon fiber and lightweight structures. The intricate surface texture reflects the laborious effort that went into the fabrication of the piece by hand and allows the piece to catch the light in unexpected ways. The open lattice of the upper element lends the work a diaphanous quality, while its construction in aluminum gives it structure.

Image courtesy of Public Art Fund

Katja Novitskova, EARTH POTENTIAL
June 22, 2017 to November 9, 2017
City Hall Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

EARTH POTENTIAL is an exhibition of new works by artist Katja Novitskova that explores the relationships among science, technology, fiction, and our image-based culture. Scattered throughout the park are seven large aluminum sculptures featuring online-sourced, digitally-printed images of the Earth, celestial objects, and enlarged, seemingly alien but terrestrial organisms. These striking images were originally created through advanced imaging techniques like a microscope that can magnify an organism by 10,000 times or a satellite orbiting the Earth. These new sculptures explore worlds unseen by the naked eye by employing photography, scale, and juxtaposition to transform the park into a seemingly Sci-Fi landscape. Through both scientific and poetic lenses, Novitskova invites us to reflect on the ways in which we see–and comprehend–the potential of the Earth.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Josiah McElheny, Prismatic Park
June 13, 2017 to October 8, 2017
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Prismatic Park features three large sculptures of painted wood and prismatic glass by artist and MacArthur Foundation Fellow recipient Josiah McElheny. The minimal, almost architectural forms create new spaces within the Park for the creation of music, dance, and poetry: a curvilinear, translucent blue sound wall for experimental music; a circular, reflective green floor for vanguard dance; and a vaulted-roofed luminous red and yellow pavilion for poetry. Each will refract the surrounding natural light, beckoning the passerby and regular Park visitor. The three structures will form open, stage-like platforms for the collaborating choreographers, dancers, musicians, and poets who will be working next to them, on them, and under them in the summer of 2017.

Throughout the exhibition, three nonprofit art organizations based in New York–Blank Forms, Danspace Project, and Poets House–will “inhabit” the Park to realize new commissions. The resident artists will create ambitious new work that summons the potential for imagination, creativity, and performance inspired by spontaneous audiences and chance encounters that only a public place, like an urban park, can offer.
This exhibition is presented by Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Amanda Long, Wishing Well, photo courtesy of the artist

Amanda Long, Wishing Well
October 29, 2016 to October 3, 2017
Dyckman Farmhouse Museum, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Wishing Well, a playful, site-specific, interactive sculpture, is an updated, technological interpretation of a fairy tale wishing well, a popular theme in European folklore. Wishing wells were believed to grant requests by way of magical waters or deities residing within. Visitors of all ages are encouraged to speak a wish into the well. The words are translated into a video ripple inside, and an echo repeats the words back. Turning the well’s crank activates video and microphone recordings, which are captured in a database inside the sculpture. The recordings will be curated and presented on a dedicated website, wishingwellnyc.org, bringing the artwork beyond the physical space of the park.

The Dyckman Farmhouse, a Dutch Colonial style farmhouse built c. 1784, was opened as a museum in 1916. Today it is nestled in a small garden and is an extraordinary reminder of early Manhattan and important part of the diverse Inwood neighborhood. The original well has long been absent from the house, although a replacement well-head was constructed around 1915-1916 during the restoration of the farmhouse. This well-head was removed sometime in the 1980’s and replaced by a simple wood platform. Installed at the site of the original well on the Dyckman property, Long’s video sculpture enlivens the vacant well site as a fantasy restoration.

This exhibition is presented by the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and the Historic House Trust, with support from the New York State Council on the Arts.

Image courtesy of Art in FLUX

Aya Rodriguez-Izumi, Reflections
May 31, 2017 to September 30, 2017
Morningside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Reflections is a grouping of three interactive public sculptures that utilize the collective ideas of art and yoga as platforms for healing, harmony, and reflection while simultaneously encouraging inclusivity and diversity in two practices that are historically non-diverse. The sculptures utilize readily-available materials such as PVC pipes and Mylar flag canopies to create environments for contemplation and reflection. Each of the three canopies has circular openings that reveal a view of the sky above. A non-profit community partner, Three and A Half Acres Yoga, will present free introductory community yoga classes around the structures on the second Saturday of each month throughout the exhibition.

Reflections is presented by his exhibition is presented by Art in FLUX , FLUX Art Fair , and Three and a Half Acres Yoga, with public funds from Creative Engagement / Creative Learning, supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and administered by Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Bjorn Skaarup, Hippo Ballerina
February 7, 2017 to September 25, 2017
Dante Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

“Hippo Ballerina,” a copper tutu-clad bronze sculpture standing over 15 feet tall, by Danish artist Bjørn Skaarup plants her sizable slippered feet across from Lincoln Center. Inspired by Degas’ “Little Dancer Aged Fourteen” and the dancing hippos of Walt Disney’s “Fantasia,” “Hippo Ballerina” vividly illustrates the artist’s ability to reinterpret subjects and themes found in ancient myths, art history, modern animation, and contemporary popular culture in playful ways that engage the viewer. This is Skaarup’s first US public art installation.

This exhibition is presented by Cavalier Galleries.

Liz Glynn, Open House
March 1, 2017 to September 24, 2017
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Open House transforms Doris C. Freedman Plaza into an open air ballroom where only scattered furniture and arches remain eight blocks south from the original mansion. It references one of the grandest Fifth Avenue interiors designed by Gilded Age architect Stanford White: the now–demolished William C. Whitney Ballroom.Glynn’s lavish Louis XIV sofas, chairs, and footstools evoke the historic home, but with a twist–these objects feature sculpted additions and are cast in concrete, a populist material more commonly seen in modern architecture. With this revision, the artist invites the public to enjoy a previously exclusive interior space that is now open and accessible to all.

This exhibition is presented by Public Art Fund.

Martin Ramone Delossantos, Little Oil Well
October 5, 2016 to September 14, 2017
Ahearn Park, Manhattan
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Description:

This work by Hoboken–based artist Martin Ramone Delossantos is an abstraction of an oil well. Consisting of a four–part lower portion made of thick steel tubes, the sculpture is topped by two bicycle wheels that give it a kinetic quality. Delossantos is a sculptor, painter, and artisan who creates whimsical sculptures out of metal and found metal objects that interact with space. His sculptures represent rhythm, feelings, and emotions. The artist hopes that this work will bring attention to the vibrant arts community in his hometown of Hoboken across the Hudson River. This is only the second exhibit ever placed in Ahearn Park, on New York’s Lower East Side.

Adam Frezza & Terri Chiao, Sea Paddles
June 23, 2017 to September 1, 2017
Central Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Adam Frezza & Terri Chiao are an American artist duo whose work explores play and craft across a range of media, including painted sculpture, installation, collage and photography.
Sea Paddles, is a continued experimentation with exterior-grade levels of construction, painting, and finishing on large paper-pulp sculptures.

Sea Paddles is part of the gallery exhibition Plant Patterns, which features the work of Adam Frezza & Terri Chiao, Adrienne Elise Tarver, Karin Haas, Liesl Pfeffer and Nick Wildermuth. The artists use plants’ impressive natural characteristics as a means to explore various themes in their graphic works. Domestic and wild flora have provided artists with inspiration for centuries. The diversity and multitude of plant colors, shapes, and repetitive forms, which evolved to lure pollinators, caution predators, and promote regeneration, are naturally appealing to artists’ sensibilities.

This exhibition is in conjunction with Plant Patterns on view in the Arsenal Gallery.

Image courtesy of the artist

Tom Monsees, Tripod
June 1, 2017 to August 26, 2017
Dyckman House Museum, Manhattan
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Description:

Tripod is made up of a trio of casts from a found piece of rotting wood. Remade in a ghostly white, matte cement, it makes reference to to death masks and pays homage to the object’s prior life. The wood is elevated to a place of honor generally reserved for well known, and/or well-regarded, human subjects.

This exhibition is presented by the Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and the Historic House Trust.

Phyllis Hammond, Beyond the Edge
October 15, 2016 to August 25, 2017
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
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Description:

Hamptons-based artist Phyllis Hammond has created five new sculptures for Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, entitled Tempo, Alien, Flying, Gateway, and Sign of Freedom. Exhibited together under the title Beyond the Edge, the steel and aluminum sculptures feature narrow stem-like bases topped by whimsical, kinetic elements that rotate in the wind. Hammond uses an improvisational method to create her colorful, large-scale sculptures. The metal cutouts are based on playful, looping doodles on paper that she scans and modifies using a computer program. Once the drawings have been refined digitally, the designs are cut from sheets of metal using a water jet machine. After the metal shapes are hammered, bent and welded into curved shapes, they are powder-coated with brightly colored paint.

Courtesy of the artist

Yasumitsu Morito, Spirit of New York City
October 25, 2016 to August 25, 2017
Carl Schurz Park, Manhattan
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Description:

Japanese artist Yasumitsu Morito designed Spirit of New York City to harmonize with the setting of Carl Schurz Park. The work sits just above the Hoop Garden, surrounded by trees lining the pathway to the promenade along the East River. Yasumitsu’s work addresses the human form within space, what it is to be human, and how the human spirit responds to social, political, and religious circumstances. For this installation, he considered both the practical and aesthetic experiences of the viewer. The sculpture conveys a sense of spiritual presence and prompts park visitors to contemplate the past, present, and future of sculpture in tandem with that of the park. Sitting on a vessel symbolizing the melting pot, the human figure represents a moment of serene contemplation amidst the commotion of the city.

Lluis Lleo, Morpho's Nest in the Cadmium House
May 1, 2017 to July 31, 2017
Park Avenue Malls from 52nd Street to 56th Street
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
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Description:

Morpho’s Nest in the Cadmium House is a site-specific installation of five double-sided paintings on carved Catalonian sandstone by New York-based Spanish artist Lluis Lleó. The 13-foot, 7,000-pound paintings are Lleó’s first public art exhibition in New York.

For Lleó, the paintings are an encounter between tradition and modernity, a merger of Catalan Romanesque frescoes and the work of modern American masters such as Mark Rothko, Ellsworth Kelly, and Agnes Martin. With poetic finesse, Lleó carves into the thick and dense sandstone, which he combines with ancestral fresco painting to create a tension between color and form. The title of the work references the morpho butterfly, a beautiful and fragile species found in Mexico and Central and South America.

This exhibition is presented with the Fund for Park Avenue.

Queens

Daniele Frazier, The Giant Flowers
June 2017 to June 2018
Highland Park, Queens
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Description:

Daniele Frazier’s exhibition The Giant Flowers consists of five giant flowers made of rip-stop nylon fabric that will inflate and move hypnotically in the wind. Each twelve-foot-long brightly colored flower will be a unique design and will tower above the park twenty feet off the ground. Not only will these joyous flowers be an unexpected sight to behold, but they will provide park-goers a real-life illustration of the changing weather conditions.

Sam Holleran, Patrick Rowe and Mobile Print Power, Conocer y Compartir-We Find Each Other
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
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Description:

Inspired by the luminaires of the 1964/65 World’s Fair, a series of illuminated sculptures guides parkgoers with graphic images that symbolize a specific place or potential experience within the park. Mobile Print Power facilitated two multilingual drawing and silkscreen printmaking sessions to create the images for the luminaires. The project builds on wayfinding suggestions that came out of The World’s Park, a project of the Design Trust for Public Space in partnership with the Queens Museum and NYC Parks.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

See all locations for this project

Risa Puno, Common Ground, Photography by Justin Hoch

Risa Puno, Common Ground
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Rufus King Park, Queens
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Description:

Consisting of a grid of interconnected picnic tables with tiled mosaic surfaces, Common Ground is an interactive sculpture that literally brings people closer together. The shared tabletops and benches each have a different mosaic design inspired by the neighborhood’s unique mix of cultures, as well as by the patterns within the adjacent King Manor Museum. Common Ground is a celebration of harmony through diversity, imbued with the ideals of the park’s namesake, Rufus King.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant

Penelope Eleni, Neighborhood Stories, Courtesy of Friends of Astoria Heights Park

Penelope Eleni, Neighborhood Stories
June 2017 to November 2017
Rainey Park, Queens
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Description:

These ceramic tiles were created through a series of children’s art workshops at Sunnyside Community Services at Woodside Housing. Inspired by the artwork of Romare Bearden, Red Grooms, Faith Ringgold, children carved city scenes into ceramic tiles while flank the iron columns at the entrances to Rainey Park.

This exhibition is presented by The Friends of Astoria Heights Park with support from Sunnyside Community Center at Woodside Houses.

Courtesy of the artist

Jennifer Cecere, Double Doily
November 18, 2016 to November 17, 2017
PS1 Greenstreet (Jackson Avenue and 46th Avenue), Queens
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Description:

Jennifer Cecere’s artwork aims to integrate a feeling of domestic handiwork into the built environment. Doilies were invented by industrious women to hide and protect worn and frayed furnishings (maybe feelings too). Through the variety of materials that they can be made from, the ways in which they can be displayed, and their references to a variety of subject matter makes doilies very diverse. This double–sided, doily–shaped bench enlivens this small park in the midst of a busy thoroughfare and new construction by taking something intimate and domestic and placing it outdoors. The handicraft of the bench demonstrates a familiarity with domestic materials that ties us with our fragile environment and revives traditions that when integrated with art and architecture reflect our hopes and dreams.

Herb Rosenberg, A Monument to Hope, 2017, image courtesy of the artist

Various Artists, On the Rock 2017: An Exhibition of Sculpture
June 3, 2017 to October 9, 2017
Rockaway Beach and Boardwalk, Queens
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Description:

This group exhibition includes 16 sculptures by 15 artists at 14 sites adjacent to the newly completed boardwalk on Shore Front Parkway, spanning from Beach 73 Street to Beach 108 Street. The sculptures celebrate the spirit and beauty of the Rockaways and range from the intimate to the monumental. Artists in this exhibition include Dan Bergman, Allan Cyprys, Febrications, Esther A. Grillo, Bibiana Huang Matheis, Christina Jorge, Sui Park, Siena Gillann Porta, Carl Rattner, Herb Rosenberg, Stan Squirewell, Anne Stanner, Chuck von Schmidt, and collaborative artists Carmen Frank and Laura Frank. During each month of the exhibition, arts and cultural events, special programs and tours will be offered free to the public. For more information on related programming, please visit 14sculptors.com.

This exhibition is presented by 14 Sculptors Inc., with support from the Queens Council on the Arts with public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Image courtesy of Friends of Astoria Heights Park

Astoria Heights Park Little Library
June 22, 2017 to September 30, 2017
Astoria Heights Park, Queens
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Description:

With their park is under renovation, Friends of Astoria Heights Park (FoAHP) continues to look for ways to keep families engaged with each other and their park. They have held an annual book swap within the park to share their love of literacy and to support families who may not have a personal library at home. FoAHP would like to extend this idea to the installation of a Little Library on park property so local residents can continue to spread the joy of books.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of Astoria Heights Park and Connection Church.

Image courtesy of Artbuilt

ArtBuilt, Studio in the Park: What Is Wild
July 1, 2017 to August 15, 2017
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
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Description:

What Is Wild is the fifth residency of the Studio in the Park program at the Queens Museum. What Is Wild is a collective nature documentary project and installation made especially for NYC Parks and by a neurodiverse community primarily involving youth. A workshop series prompted by the question “what is wild?” will culminate in a short documentary focused on a collective perspective of the natural plant-life and wildlife within Flushing Meadows Corona Park. The project celebrates both the accessible nature available in our city parks and how we are ALL connected as humans on this planet, regardless of our abilities.

The Studio in the Park residency takes place in a 150 square foot purpose-built mobile studio situated adjacent to the Queens Museum in Flushing Meadows Corona Park. This exhibition is presented by ArtBuilt and the Queens Museum.

Antonia A Perez, Light Spectrum
April 15, 2017 to August 6, 2017
Lewis H Latimer House, Queens
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Description:

Installed amidst a grove of trees adjacent to the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum, Light Spectrum draws the viewer’s attention to the science of light and color. Composed of discarded metal lampshade frames welded together in a totemic form, Perez’s sculpture is wrapped with crocheted plastic bags that turn the column into a filter for natural light infused with color. Her sculpture is an homage to the house’s former inhabitant, inventor Lewis Howard Latimer who played an integral role in patenting the light bulb and telephone.

This exhibition is presented by the Lewis H. Latimer House Museum, with support from the Queens Council on the Arts with public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Staten Island

Lina Montoya, Mariposas Lamps
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Faber Pool and Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s Cien Años de Soledad, Montoya’s illuminated sculptures redefine the monarch butterfly as an icon of migration and freedom. This work is part of the series La Isla Bonita, a beautification project that seeks to transform public spaces through public art and community engagement.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Fitzhugh Karol, Eyes
June 20, 2017 to June 19, 2018
Tappen Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Eyes’ intersecting steel shapes are derived from the simple silhouettes of hillsides and stairs, and frame the park’s historic Village Hall. The integrated play feature provides a chance to engage with the work in a way that most sculptures do not allow, appealing to the community in a fundamental way.

This exhibition was made possible by the Art in the Parks: UNIQLO Park Expressions Grant.

Susan Stair, Tree Reflections
October 15, 2016 to October 14, 2017
Conference House Park, Staten Island
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Description:

Tree Reflections is a series of clay tiles cast from two Osage Orange trees combined with mosaic pieces that tells the story of two parks. The main components of this artwork are cast from an Osage Orange tree in Marcus Garvey Park near the artist’s home in Harlem. After visiting Conference House Park, Stair cast four clay extensions from the Osage Orange tree there, which were added to the existing artwork. Stair’s aims to create portraits of trees through her work. The clay that she presses onto living trees records their species, age, and strength. She was particularly attracted to the trees’ remarkable patterns, bending forms, and endurance, physical qualities that demonstrate the unique historical importance of this species.

An additional exhibition of Stair’s work in the Conference House Park Visitor Center’s Lenape Gallery will open on November 25 as part of Native American Heritage month.

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