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1964 World's Fair in Photos

The 1964-65 World’s Fair brought Flushing Meadows Corona Park to the world’s attention for the second time. The theme of the fair was “Peace through Understanding.” Popular exhibits included General Motors’ “Futurama II” portraying the world of 2064, American Telephone and Telegraph’s models of the Picturephone, the large dinosaur sculptures in Sinclair Oil’s “Dinoland,” International Business Machines’ presentation of basic computers, the New York State Pavilion, the Hall of Science, and the miniature “Panorama” of the five boroughs in the New York City Building. Whether it was the introduction to the computer, the color photograph, or even the Belgian Waffle, everyone who attended has a memory of something they experienced there for the first time, and the spirit of innovation, excitement, and fun captured in one of the largest exhibitions ever held in the United States.

Visitors to the World's Fair could ascend to the two observation decks of the New York State Pavilion and enjoy a 360 degree view of the fair below them.

This picture was taken from the observation deck, looking north. In the foreground, in front of the Unisphere, is the New Jersey State Pavilion. The newly built Shea Stadium can be seen in the distant background.

The 1964 World's Fair's most iconic structures, both still standing, were the Unisphere (in the foreground) and the New York State Pavilion (in the background).

The World's Fair marina, built for the fair but still in use today, is one of the largest public recreational boating facilities on the eastern seaboard.

A view from inside the Eastman Kodak Pavilion, which had an undulating roof that was designed to provide a tempting backdrop for visitors' photos. The "bubble roof" of one of the many Brass Rail snack bars can be seen in the upper right hand corner.

The 120-foot-tall Unisphere was built by US Steel for the 1964 World's Fair and was meant to symbolize the dawn of the Space Age, one of the fair's central themes.

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