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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

2014

Manhattan

Jim Rennert, THINK BIG
June 3, 2014 to October 31, 2014
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Jim Rennert’s THINK BIG stands at over 12-feet tall serving as an inspiration to everyone who works hard every day to achieve their dreams and goals. The monumental businessman gazes up at the sky and the Manhattan skyline, reminding us that if we “think big” we can attain anything and that the American Dream is still very much alive and possible. Businessman or not, everyone can still relate to the themes in their own personal ways. THINK BIG is the culmination of positive thinking, as the original concept started as a two-inch sculpture. Rennert is excited to bring the sculpture to New York so that everyone can indeed, “think big.”

The project is made possible by the Cavalier Gallery and Union Square Partnership.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas, Arch III
May 2014 to September 2014
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Strong-Cuevas, whose work has been acclaimed by critics around the world and whose powerful, dramatic sculptures are in numerous public and private collections internationally, is exhibiting a large bronze, ARCH III, at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza. The arch is a symbolic gateway to peace and cooperation represented by the United Nations, which is at the east end of 47 Street.

Joshua Ruff, the Long Island Museum’s Director of Collections and Interpretations, wrote: “The monumental scale of her sculptures holds their own. But regardless of size, Strong-Cuevas’ art has an enormous, captivating grip... [her] work is both thought-provoking and energetic, the result of many years of careful and inspired artistic evolution and wonderfully diverse influences...Her work really must be seen and enjoyed in person for a full appreciation.”

Rachel Feinstein, Folly
May 7, 2014 to September 7, 2014
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Marking Rachel Feinstein’s first public art exhibition in the U.S. and comprising her largest sculptural works to date, the installation consists of three follies–structures that were popular in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century architecture, built with decorative rather than functional purpose. Feinstein’s sculptures are executed in graphically printed and detailed panels of thin metal, ranging from eight to 26 feet tall. The three structures include a house perched on a towering cliff, a Rococo-style hut, and a flying ship moored high in a tree, supported by a mast extending to the ground.

Best known for her fanciful sculptures, Feinstein’s stage-set follies for Mad. Sq. Art are made of powder-coated aluminum with applied surface illustration. They are not inhabitable as the works are sculptural reliefs: they have active, three-dimensional facades and flat backs with structural supports. Installed on three park lawns, the structures will evoke theatrical scenery in which the park visitors are the actors.

This exhibition is presented by Mad. Sq. Art.

Olaf Breuning, Clouds
March 4, 2014 to August 24, 2014
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
?Olaf Breuning’s largest public art installation in the United States to date, the work features six clouds rendered as childlike drawings made of polished blue aluminum towering nearly 35 feet above the plaza and mounted on seemingly makeshift steel supports. Blending reality with fiction and refined forms with a do-it-yourself aesthetic, this new work is a whimsical addition to the Midtown Manhattan skyline.

This exhibition is presented by the Public Art Fund

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

Caraballo-Farman, The Signs of Paradise
June 20, 2014 to August 23, 2014
Battery Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Since 1886, the Statue of Liberty has invited immigrants from across the world to seek out their own piece of worldly paradise here in the United States. Today, each of the 50 states has its own town called “Paradise.” With this installation, celebrated artist Caraballo-Farman offers visitors to Battery Park directions and distances to each of the 50 Paradises within eye-shot of Lady Liberty.

The exhibition is brought to you by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Alice Aycock, Cyclone Twist courtesy of NYC Parks

Alice Aycock, Park Avenue Paper Chase
March 8, 2014 to July 20, 2014
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Park Avenue Paper Chase, a series of seven sculptures by artist Alice Aycock, grace the canyons of Manhattan this spring and summer. Six works are on view between 52nd and 57th Streets and a seventh work is at Park Avenue and 66th Street in front of the Park Avenue Armory. Aycock has long been one of very few women exploring the relationship between structure, site, and viewer on an architectural scale, like her peers Richard Serra and Mark di Suvero.

Ranging in size from 12 to 27 feet in height 18 to 70 feet in length, the aluminum and fiberglass works in the new installation forms an arresting presence in the heart of midtown Manhattan. According to Aycock “I tried to visualize the movement of wind energy as it flowed up and down the avenue creating random whirlpools, touching down here and there and sometimes forming dynamic three-dimensional massing of forms. The sculptural assemblages suggest waves, wind turbulence, turbines, and vortexes of energy.”

Many of the new works incorporate images of wheels and turbines and references to energy in the form of spirals, whirlwinds, whirlpools, spinning tops, and whirly-gigs. One of the works references the expressive quality of wind through drapery and the chaotic beauty of flow dynamics. The sculptures can be read from both sides of the avenue and the visual narrative plays to both the uptown and downtown movement of traffic patterns. Aycock continues “As much as the sculptures are obviously placed on the mall, I wanted the work to have a random, haphazard quality – in some cases, piling up on itself, with others spinning off into the air.”

Sculpture locations include Maelstrom at 52nd-53rd Street; Hoop-La at 53rd Street; Twin Vortexes at 54th Street, Spin-The-Spin at 55th Street; Waltzing Matilda at 56th Street; Cyclone Twist at 57th Street and Super Twister III at 66th Street.

Scribble Art Workshop, Inwood Sculpture Crawl, Photo Courtesy of Dyckman Farmhouse

Scribble Art Workshop, Inwood Sculpture Crawl
June 21, 2014 to July 13, 2014
Dyckman House Museum, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Wander the Dyckman Farmhouse garden and discover the Scribble Art Workshop sculptures tucked away into this neighborhood oasis. Seven sculptures, including those created with public participation, are on view.

The Inwood Sculpture Crawl is sponsored by Scribble Art Workshop and the NYC Parks. Each of the 10 sculptures installed in Inwood Hill Park and Dyckman Farmhouse was designed by a scribble teacher and created by collaborations of artists ranging in age from 18 months to adulthood. Themes highlight the naturalsurroundings of the urbanInwood neighborhood and focuses on the stark contrast of natural and manmade materials.

This exhibition is presented by Scribble Art Workshop and Dyckman Farmhouse Museum

Scribble Art Workshop, Inwood Sculpture Crawl, Photo Courtesy of Scribble Art Workshop

Scribble Art Workshop, Inwood Sculpture Crawl
June 21, 2014 to July 13, 2014
Inwood Hill Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

On view in Inwood Hill, Arch designed by Katelyn Renner is inspired by the Henry Hudson Bridge’s arch, this piece was produced by building small sections of metal into one large mass. Artists manipulated the metal in interesting and abstract ways, using aluminum tape to create relief-like images.

The Inwood Sculpture Crawl is sponsored by Scribble Art Workshop and the NYC Parks. Each of the 10 sculptures installed in Inwood Hill Park and Dyckman Farmhouse was designed by a scribble teacher and created by collaborations of artists ranging in age from 18 months to adulthood. Themes highlight the natural surroundings of the urban Inwood neighborhood and focuses on the stark contrast of natural and manmade materials.

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

Chat Traversio, On a Fence
July 20, 2013 to June 30, 2014
Pier 42, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

The Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance & Lower Manhattan Cultural Council invited artists and design professionals to participate in a community-driven, site-responsive design process for the temporary activation of Pier 42 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Artists and designers were asked to propose ideas for cultural activity including temporary public art, small-scale interventions, programming and event spaces that directly engage the site and community in which the pier is located.

Chat Travieso is a Brooklyn-based artist and architectural designer born in Miami, Florida. Travieso creates interactive installations and urban interventions that engage the public and encourage people to question their assumptions of the everyday built environment.

Chat’s project “On a Fence” transforms the fence surrounding Pier 42 into an interactive structure incorporating seating, play, exercise, and signage (done in collaboration with graphic designer Yeju Choi). The project seeks to invert the function and meaning of the fence from a physical barrier to a place of inclusion. On a Fence is in collaboration with Yeju Choi, (Signage, Graphic Design and Identity)

For more information on the project please visit Paths to Pier 42.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Robert Raphael, Untitled Folly, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 1, 2014 to June 9, 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

Raphael’s work at Randall’s Island Park investigates the category of the ornamental and decorative, and the idea of an architectural “folly” in contrast to functional structures. Specifically, inspired by the Island’s early use for farming by Dutch settlers, Raphael’s folly will be based on the form of a split rail fence, typically used for agriculture, in romantic and nostalgic homage to the Island’s past and to the beginning of its ongoing and complex historical transformations. FLOW.14 also includes Dean Monogenis’ City Pillars, Jessica Sander’s Ground, andKant Smith’s Ghost House.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

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