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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

2014

Manhattan

Nathan Sawaya, Hugman, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Nathan Sawaya, Hugmen
April 17, 2014 to May 17, 2014
Clement Clarke Moore Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

In the community spirit of Earth Day, Nathan Sawaya utilized the recycled bricks that guests were asked to individually sign when they visited The Art of the Brick exhibition at Discovery Times Square. Nathan used more than fifty thousand bricks over the course of 100 hours to create three multi-colored human figures that warmly embrace the trees in the park. “I hope these splashes of color made from recycled LEGO bricks inspire people to explore found art and bring awareness to using reclaimed objects in their everyday lives.”

As the artist behind The Art of the Brick®, one of the largest and most popular art exhibits touring the globe, Sawaya has had an opportunity to leave his creative mark in each city the exhibition visits. Sawaya has installed his street art Hugman sculptures around the world, such as Singapore, Melbourne, Brussels and most recently, Dublin. For his first NYC Parks installation, he has created three larger-than-life Hugman.

Ana Tzarev, Love, Courtesy of Ana Tzarev Gallery

Ana Tzarev, Love
October 14, 2013 to April 27, 2014
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Love & Peace Global Sculpture Campaign is a series of 15 monumental glossy 15-foot high floral sculptures which are exhibited in galleries, museums, and public spaces around the globe from 2012-2017. These fiberglass poppies, collectively titled Love, have travelled to numerous cities including Rome, Prague, New York, London, Singapore, Shenzhen, and Venice during the 55th Biennale. The driving force behind Tzarev’s Love & Peace Global Sculpture Campaign is her belief that art is the bridge by which the world can be connected.

This exhibition is presented by  Ana Tzarev Gallery

Fanny Allie Serendipty photo courtesy of the artist

Fanny Allié, Serendipity
June 2013 to April 25, 2014
Tompkins Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Fanny Allie, a French artist based in New York, has created a site-specific public artwork for Tompkins Square Park in Manhattan’s East Village. The sculpture, titled Serendipity, is a life-size, steel silhouette of a formerly homeless man who spent much of his time in the park. The exhibition will be located near the western entrance at St. Mark’s Place and Avenue A and is on view through November 2013.

Allie visited Tompkins Square to prepare for the exhibition and find a regular park visitor to serve as the model for her piece. Instead the model found her. Christopher Gamble approached Allie and struck up a conversation. They later met for coffee where he revealed he was previously homeless for 28 years and frequented the park. Gamble agreed to model for the sculpture. The steel figure stands with its face looking up to the sky, shoulders and arms outreached, preparing to take flight. Allie interprets the piece as a symbol of hope and the desire to strive for something greater. In a series of recent works, she has focused on the human body, with a particular interest in its outline. By removing the center of the figure, she plays with ideas of memory and the mark we leave on places and others.

Andy Scott, The Kelpies, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Andy Scott, The Kelpies
March 21, 2014 to April 22, 2014
Bryant Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Two 15–foot–high steel models of the largest equine sculptures in the world are on view in Bryant Park as part of the launch of Scotland Week in New York City.  The larger–than–life installation, known as The Kelpies, was created by Scotland’s leading public artist Andy Scott.

Creating a majestic, awe–inspiring atmosphere in Bryant Park, The Kelpies are the original 1:10 scale design models of Andy’s 100–foot–tall sculptures located in the heart of the new 900 acre Helix Parkland in Falkirk, central Scotland.

With one horse rearing up and the other at rest, a dramatic sense of motion is created.  The sculptures are made from hundreds of small pieces of steel plate painstakingly welded to create the forms. The Kelpies were then galvanized, a process that involves dipping the sculptures in baths of molten zinc.   The full scale sculptures are now among the largest equine artworks in the world.

Inspiration for this work came from the Clydesdale horses that, for centuries, pulled boats and cargo along the towpaths of the Forth & Clyde and Union Canals in Scotland. 

This exhibition is presented by the American Scottish Foundation and Bryant Park Corporation.

Carol Bove, Celeste, 2013. Part of the HIGH LINE COMMISSION Caterpillar. On view at the High Line at the Rail Yards. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Carol Bove, Caterpillar
May 16, 2013 to April 20, 2014
Rail Yards
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Public Walks Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays
Free admission. Advance reservations required, RESERVE ONLINE!

High Line Art presents Caterpillar by artist Carol Bove, a HIGH LINE COMMISSION featuring seven sculptures that punctuate the wild landscape on the High Line at the Rail Yards, the third and final section of the High Line. Bove’s commission is the last opportunity to see this section of the elevated railway in its natural state before it opens as public parkland in 2014. The commission will be viewable during public walks on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays until May 2014. Advance reservations are required. Admission is free and reservations can be made online.

For the High Line, Bove continues her research on the role and function of art in the public space, by creating seven new sculptures which are installed within the self-seeded landscape on the High Line at the Rail Yards. Bove’s site-specific installation highlights the uniqueness of its location and opens a magical environment for viewers. Installed along a 300-yard stretch of the untouched terrain of the High Line, Bove’s sculptures reveal themselves among the unruly vegetation, like mysteriously pristine ruins of a lost civilization or a contemporary version of a Zen garden. Abstract shapes and enigmatic forms are carefully placed along the High Line, creating a unique viewing experience surrounded by the wilderness of the High Line and the stunning views of the Hudson River.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line

Image credit: Carol Bove, Celeste, 2013. Part of the HIGH LINE COMMISSION Caterpillar. On view at the High Line at the Rail Yards. Photo by Timothy Schenck. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Herb Alpert, Black Spirit Totems
January 25, 2014 to April 15, 2014
Dante Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Herb Alpert finds inspiration in the diverse cultural associations of totems, especially the ones unique to the tribes in the Pacific Northwest. These ancestral totems have been the essence of family and tribal identity. Alpert’s totems, first modeled in clay and then cast in bronze, read abstractly but also suggest recognizable, organic forms: an eagle form seems to emerge from the top of one, and human shapes surface in others. These sometimes sensuous, abstract structures and the artist’s creative process are fluid like jazz, making intangible compositions physical. Alpert, a leading musician, composer, and music producer makes connections between the fluid nature of his sculpture and his intuitive approach to music.

This exhibition is presented with ACA Galleries

Installation view of Iván Navarro’s This Land Is Your Land (2014) in Madison Square Park. Photo by Elisabeth Bernstein.

Ivan Navarro, This Land is Your Land
February 20, 2014 to April 13, 2014
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
Ivan Navarro’s site-specific installation presents three water towers inside of which neon reflections repeat infinitely. The sculptures merge a staple of the New York skyline with the street-level landscape of the Park. The artist takes the exhibition’s title from the beloved 1940 Woody Guthrie folk song, which is both an American anthem and a vocal pull to the freedoms offered in this country for an immigrant population. The towers are elevated to a height above visitors’ heads, allowing them to walk underneath and look up into each sculpture to view the content within.

Navarro’s water towers—each measuring approximately seven feet in diameter and standing on roughly eight-foot-tall supports—will function as vessels for a vocabulary of the political and personal experience of immigration. The interior of one tower will feature the words “me” and “we”, another will feature the word “bed”, and a third will display the image of a ladder—all of which will be composed of neon light. An internal arrangement of mirrors will enable each word or image to repeat perpetually through a seemingly endless vertical space.

This exhibition is presented by the Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Kent Henricksen, We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars, photo courtesy of the artist

Kent Henricksen, We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars
April 26, 2013 to April 11, 2014
Allen and Grand Street
Allen Mall One, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars is part of a progression from a series of smaller sculptures Henricksen made out of porcelain. The porcelain series started in 2010 with a show at John Connelly Presents in Chelsea and the Brooklyn Museum acquired one of these sculptures in 2011. Awry and gnarled, Henricksen’s tree trunks are riddled with arborglyphs, delivering messages that speak of human behavior, while conveying both distress and conviction. The quote “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars is found in Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere's Fan.

Cheryl Farber Smith, Mellow Yellow, Courtesy of the artist

Cheryl Farber Smith, Mellow Yellow
April 29, 2013 to April 6, 2014
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Cheryl Farber Smith’s Mellow Yellow is as fun as its name. The nine-foot tall aluminum sculpture is a playful piece that juxtaposes the most basic of all visual elements –geometric shapes. Painted a brilliant yellow, the sculpture is comprised of suspended circles, cylinders and cubes that take part in an animated dance. Centrally located in Tribeca Park (also known as Beach Street Park), this sculpture will brighten the heavily canopied plaza. Smith, who exhibited her sculpture Leaning Firm in Brooklyn’s Columbus Park in 2007, also explores similar themes in her photographic prints.

Charles Ginnever, High Rise
May 30, 2013 to March 31, 2014
145th Street
Riverside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
Charles Ginnever’s piece High Rise (1984) is located on the lawn along the water at 145th Street in Riverside Park through March 2014. This exhibition marks Ginnever’s return to Parks, having exhibited in Carl Schurz Park in 1967 as part of Sculpture in Environment, one of the city’s first public art exhibitions. Charles Ginnever was born in San Mateo, CA in 1931. He is best known for his large-scale, open form works for the outdoors. He created the first of these in 1958 with abandoned railroad ties and structural steel. The result was a deconstruction of prevailing sculptural spatial concepts that he continues to examine. A contemporary of Mark di Suvero and Richard Serra, who also exhibit monumental steel pieces, Ginnever’s sculptures have a trick of the eye and appear to warp as someone looks at the pieces from different angles.

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