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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

2012

Citywide

Students of 239K with their table Gambling with Time, courtesy of NYC Parks

LeAp, A View from the Lunch Table: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
June 8, 2012 to August 31, 2012
Citywide

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program included visits with distinguished artists such as Emma Amos, Mark di Suvero, Audrey Flack, Christo, Mel Kendrick, and Sanford Biggers, among many others. For 33 years, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts–based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August at: Central Park and Augustus Saint-Gaudens Playground in Manhattan; Kaiser Park and Detective Joseph Mayrose Park in Brooklyn; Crotona Park and Claremont Park in the Bronx; Juniper Valley Park and Forest Park in Queens; and Silver Lake Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

For more information visit the LEAP website.

Mary Mattingly, Flock House. Courtesy of the artist.

Mary Mattingly, FlockHouse
June 16, 2012 to August 15, 2012
Citywide

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
​The Flock House initiative examines questions of mobile, self-sufficient living units becoming building blocks for future cities.  Reflecting the future of urban space and building upon existing structures, Flock House comprises a group of mi­gratory, public, sculptural habitats that imagine a world where created envi­ronments are adaptable, collapsible, portable, and modular. As expanding urban populations face environmental, social, and economic change, Flock Houses can be built in, transported to, and survive in and among urban cen­ters along three planes of living (sub­terranean, ground, and sky).

The form and function of Flock House is inspired by current patterns of global human migration, immigration, and pilgrimage. Through workshops, organized events, an interactive website, and narrated cell phone tours, the Flock House project catalyzes and enhances community-interdependence, resourcefulness, learning, curiosity, and creative exploration.

Mobile Flock House living systems are interstitial, autonomous, and dependent on local community relationships to maintain, share, and operate. As living systems, they function as bridges for cross-discipline, cross-boundary, and cross-border notions of property and polity.

Built collaboratively upon re­claimed, recycled, redesigned, and rethought materials, Flock House promotes wider adoption of natural systems including rainwater capture, inner-city agriculture, and solar and human-powered energy technologies.

Flock House #3 - Microsphere:
June 17 - 30: Battery Park, Manhattan. Inhabitants:  Brian Zegeer, Rob Colvin, Mary Mattingly.
July 2 - 14: Coleman Oval Park, Lower Manhattan. Inhabitant: Scott Beiben
July 15 - August 30: Bronx Museum, Bronx. Inhabitant: William Lamson (July 15-July 30), Lonny Grafman (August 1-15), Scott Weiner (August 16-25)

Flock House #7 - Terrapod:
June 15 - 30: Queens Flushing Meadows Corona Park.
Inhabitant: Christopher Robbins (Ghana ThinkTank).
July 1 - 14: DUMBO, Pearl Street Triangle, Brooklyn. Inhabitant: Amelia Marzac
July 15 - 31: Snug Harbor, Staten Island. Inhabitant: Kelly Loudenberg
August 1 - 15: Bronx – Van Cortlandt Park. Inhabitants: Esteban Silva and Harley Aussoleil.

Flock House # 8 - Chromasphere:
June 27 – September 6: 125 Maiden Lane, Manhattan.  Inhabitant: Greg Lindquist.

Flock House #4 - Cocoon:
June: Rooftop, Downtown Brooklyn, NY. Inhabitant: Mary Mattingly
July 7 – September: Architecture Omi Sculpture Park, Ghent, NY.

This project is presented in conjunction with the support of generous sponsors.

Bronx

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Katherine Daniels, Ornamental Paths
June 7, 2012 to April 2013
Joyce Kilmer Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Katherine Daniels transforms everyday objects and materials into elaborately woven ornamental forms in her site specific installation, Ornamental Paths. The large-scale pieces are currently on view on the Grand Concourse between 161st and 164th Streets in the Bronx. “The placement of the weavings defines the inner triangular shape at the heart of Joyce Kilmer Park and creates a place where people can enter into a spatial drawing.” The brick and mosaic Art Deco patterns that have historically defined the neighborhood’s architectural landmarks are interpreted through Daniel’s interlaced geometric forms, horizontal stripes, and vertical bands that grace the park’s permanent wire fencing. Transcendent of an ordinary walk through the park, a stroll through Ornamental Paths will be a new experience full of color and history.

This exhibition is presented by the Clare Weiss Emerging Artist Award.

NYC Parks

Art Students League, BioMask (Model to Monument)
June 22, 2012 to November 2012
South of Van Cortlandt House
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation that has culminated in the installation of the monumental sculpture, BioMask, at Van Cortlandt Park.

The sculpture was created by an international team of seven selected League students during a nine-month program led by master sculptor Greg Wyatt.  In its second year,  ASL altered the 2011 “Mask" sculpture. In the artists will turn the mask to face the sky instead of the park and insert branch and leaf forms as if the mask were slowly but surely growing in an organic fashion like the surrounding trees.  Included in the exhibition are Sequoya Aono, Roberto Franzone, HakSul Lee, Damien Armondo Vera, Olga Rudenko, Michael Cloud Hirschfeld, and Renata Pugh.

A collaborative installation created by the team is also on concurrently on view in Riverside South Park in Manhattan.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program.

Merián Soto, Branch Dances

Merián Soto, Branch Dances
October 2011 to June 2012
Wave Hill, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Wave Hill has commissioned award-winning choreographer Merián Soto to return to the Bronx, her artistic home, to develop and perform Branch Dances at Wave Hill. This year-long work consists of an outdoor performance each season, with the first in October. Five dancers, Beau Hancock, Shavon Norris, Jumatatu  Poe, Olive Prince and Marion Ramirez, and musician Robert (Tigger) Benford connect body, mind, place and natural elements to stillness in locations that respond to Wave Hill’s brilliant foliage, sweeping vistas and sculptural trees.

Schedule of Performances

  • Saturday, October 29, 2011 (Target Free Morning)
  • Saturday, January 7, 2012 (Target Free Morning)
  • Sunday, April 22, 2012*
  • Saturday, June 23, 2012 (Target Free Morning)*

*Dates are tentative

This is a project by Wave Hill

Art Students League, Mask, Van Cortlandt Park

Art Students League, Mask (Model to Monument)
June 28, 2011 to May 2012
South of Van Cortlandt House
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

​The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation that has culminated in the installation of one monumental sculpture, Mask, at Van Cortlandt Park.

The sculpture was created by an international team of seven selected League students during a nine-month program led by master sculptor Greg Wyatt.  The decision to sculpt a theatrical mask grew out the artists’ visits to Van Corltandt. The site is near the Red Steps below the Van Cortlandt House Museum, where public theater events are being introduced by Van Cortlandt Park Conservancy. The artists are: Elizabeth Allison, John Balsamo, Allston Chapman, Akihiro Ito, Selva Sanjines, Noa Shay, and Matthew White.

Model to Monument provides a project-driven program, site-specific for the students that focuses their artistic and professional development and their ability to respond to an environment. The artists’ experience working with the City gives them the ability and background to create new public works for people to contemplate and enjoy in the years and decades to come.

Mask is made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program

Brooklyn

Ben Snead, Fish Farm (Brooklyn Snappers)
September 28, 2012 to September 27, 2013
Clumber Corner, Brooklyn, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
Three large fish heads, including a lane snapper, a yellow tail snapper and a rock hind, sprout from the corner of this slopping lawn bordered by the Brooklyn Bridge and the Brooklyn Queens Expressway.  All three species are found in local fish markets throughout Brooklyn. The fish live in tropical waters such as the Caribbean and are transported to New York City for human consumption. By enlarging them and placing them on the grass, they are taken even further out of context.

This project is presented by Two Trees Development.

Akihiro Ito, Tomorrow.  Image courtesy of the Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership.

Akihiro Ito, Tomorrow
September 27, 2012 to August 2013
Northeast Corner at Myrtle Avenue and Washington Park
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

The Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership presents Tomorrow, a temporary installation by Akihiro Ito. From September 27, 2012 through August 2013, the piece will be installed at the northeast corner of Fort Greene Park (Myrtle and Washington Park).

Akihiro Ito’s sculpture, Tomorrow, illustrates the harmony between humans and their natural surroundings, and reminds us of the importance of preserving our environment. Tomorrow is made of 600 pieces of laminated dimensional wood (Douglas fir) which form the shape of a baby – a symbol of future generations. He used this material to draw the connection between people and nature. Wood is environmentally friendly as it emits no pollutants, is a familiar resource that has been utilized for millennia, and instills feelings of warmth, serenity, and relief in people. Mr. Ito says, “Nowadays, we are facing serious environmental problems such as global warming, waste and resource depletion. We have to preserve nature and save our earth for our future generations and for all living beings. I hope this sculpture provides an opportunity for people to think about humanity’s connection to nature, and reminds us that we are all part of earth’s family.”

“Bringing sculpture to Myrtle Avenue is part of the Partnership’s larger public art initiative to underscore the neighborhood’s creative spirit and highlight our public spaces with art,” says Meredith Phillips Almeida, the Partnership’s Deputy Director. Throughout the duration of the installation, an informational card about the artist and work, designed by the Partnership, will be available at the site. The Partnership will also develop a site visit guide for local schools.

Please visit the Partnership’s website for more information about the organization and their initiatives.

Kate Newby, How Funny are You Today, New York
July 12, 2012 to January 13, 2013
Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Fort Greene Park welcomes New Zealand artist Kate Newby’s latest site-specific sculpture exhibition, “How funny are you today, New York.” The new work builds on her ongoing interest in creating work that is ephemeral and often peripheral that is integrated into public environments.  Situated in the historic setting of Fort Greene Park, a place where art, life, tradition, and culture have coalesced for centuries, Newby finds her muse in a pronounced boulder locals call “the Grey Painted Rock.” Creating a space where semi-precious and industrial materials get integrated seamlessly into the urban landscape, Newby’s installation invites park visitors to stop and rest or play while simultaneously forcing the viewer to address the artist’s reconsideration of the environment’s norms.

This exhibition is presented by the International Studio and Curatorial Program.

Leon Reid IV and Julia Marchesi, 100 Story House
September 8, 2012 to October 26, 2012
J.J. Byrne Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

J.J. Byrne Playground and Old Stone House welcome the installation of an outdoor public library designed to stimulate book sharing in the neighboring communities. Created in the style of a typical brownstone home, "The Hundred Story House" reflects the native architecture and literary tradition of Brooklyn. The artist and producer, Leon Reid IV and Julia Marchesi, hope that the neighborhood will grow closer as a community through the mutual exchange of literature encouraged by this interactive artwork. So leave a book, take a book, and share your most beloved story with the hope that you could discover a new favorite in the windows?

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