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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

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Courtesy of NYC Parks

Danh Vo, We The People
May 16, 2014 to December 5, 2014
City Hall Park, Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn

Description:

We the People is a life size copper replica of the statue in over 250 individual parts fabricated over the course of three years using the original techniques and materials. As a conceptual artist, Vo does not stipulate how many of the components should be shown together and refers to each presentation as a “detail” of the entire project. However, Public Art Fund’s exhibition featuring more than 50 pieces in Lower Manhattan’s City Hall Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park represents the largest public presentation of We the People to date. While components have been shown in exhibitions across the globe, this presentation of the work at two of New York City’s quintessential outdoor spaces invites audiences to consider the symbolic resonance of the Statue of Liberty in the city that is its home.

This is a project by the Public Art Fund.

LEAP opening reception in Union Square, Courtesy of NYC Parks

LEAP, A View from the Lunch Table: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
June 2, 2014 to August 25, 2014

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program has included visits with distinguished artists such as Jenny Holzer, Crash, Emma Amos, Christo, and Lorna Simpson among many others. For 34 years, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts–based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August at: Sara D. Roosevelt Park and Cherry Tree Park Playground in Manhattan; JJ Byrne Playground and Detective Joseph Mayrose Park in Brooklyn; St. Mary’s Park and Claremont Park in the Bronx; Juniper Valley Park and Evergreen Park in Queens; and Clove Lake Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

For more information visit the LEAP website.

LEAP opening reception in Union Square, Courtesy of NYC Parks

LEAP, A View from the Lunch Table: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
June 4, 2013 to August 31, 2013
Various Locations

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program has included visits with distinguished artists such as Emma Amos, Mark di Suvero, Audrey Flack, Christo, Mel Kendrick, and Sanford Biggers, among many others. For 33 years, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts–based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August at: Central Park and Marcus Garvey Park in Manhattan; Kaiser Park and Detective Joseph Mayrose Park in Brooklyn; Van Cortlandt Park and Claremont Park in the Bronx; Juniper Valley Park and Forest Park in Queens; and Willowbrook Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

For more information visit the LEAP website.

Deanna Aguinaga, piano for Pelham Bay Park: Orchard Beach, Bronx

Sing for Hope, Pop-Up Pianos
June 1, 2013 to June 15, 2013
Various Locations

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

This summer, from June 1st through June 16th, the Sing for Hope Pianos return to our city streets. In one of New York City’s most vibrant public art installations, 88 artist-designed pianos (one for each key on a piano) are placed in parks and public spaces throughout the 5 boroughs for anyone and everyone to enjoy.

Once on the streets, neighborhood associations and community organizations serve as “piano buddies” and supervise each piano throughout the duration of the project, making sure they are protected from inclement weather. The Sing for Hope Pianos unite our city, as artists from all walks of life create daily spontaneous concerts and neighborhoods come together around the shared gift of music and art.

For more information and a list of locations visit Sing for Hope’s Pop-Up Pianos website. Sing for Hope is presented in cooperation with the City of New York.

Students of 239K with their table Gambling with Time, courtesy of NYC Parks

LeAp, A View from the Lunch Table: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
June 8, 2012 to August 31, 2012
Citywide

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program included visits with distinguished artists such as Emma Amos, Mark di Suvero, Audrey Flack, Christo, Mel Kendrick, and Sanford Biggers, among many others. For 33 years, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts–based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August at: Central Park and Augustus Saint-Gaudens Playground in Manhattan; Kaiser Park and Detective Joseph Mayrose Park in Brooklyn; Crotona Park and Claremont Park in the Bronx; Juniper Valley Park and Forest Park in Queens; and Silver Lake Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

For more information visit the LEAP website.

Mary Mattingly, Flock House. Courtesy of the artist.

Mary Mattingly, FlockHouse
June 16, 2012 to August 15, 2012
Citywide

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
​The Flock House initiative examines questions of mobile, self-sufficient living units becoming building blocks for future cities.  Reflecting the future of urban space and building upon existing structures, Flock House comprises a group of mi­gratory, public, sculptural habitats that imagine a world where created envi­ronments are adaptable, collapsible, portable, and modular. As expanding urban populations face environmental, social, and economic change, Flock Houses can be built in, transported to, and survive in and among urban cen­ters along three planes of living (sub­terranean, ground, and sky).

The form and function of Flock House is inspired by current patterns of global human migration, immigration, and pilgrimage. Through workshops, organized events, an interactive website, and narrated cell phone tours, the Flock House project catalyzes and enhances community-interdependence, resourcefulness, learning, curiosity, and creative exploration.

Mobile Flock House living systems are interstitial, autonomous, and dependent on local community relationships to maintain, share, and operate. As living systems, they function as bridges for cross-discipline, cross-boundary, and cross-border notions of property and polity.

Built collaboratively upon re­claimed, recycled, redesigned, and rethought materials, Flock House promotes wider adoption of natural systems including rainwater capture, inner-city agriculture, and solar and human-powered energy technologies.

Flock House #3 - Microsphere:
June 17 - 30: Battery Park, Manhattan. Inhabitants:  Brian Zegeer, Rob Colvin, Mary Mattingly.
July 2 - 14: Coleman Oval Park, Lower Manhattan. Inhabitant: Scott Beiben
July 15 - August 30: Bronx Museum, Bronx. Inhabitant: William Lamson (July 15-July 30), Lonny Grafman (August 1-15), Scott Weiner (August 16-25)

Flock House #7 - Terrapod:
June 15 - 30: Queens Flushing Meadows Corona Park.
Inhabitant: Christopher Robbins (Ghana ThinkTank).
July 1 - 14: DUMBO, Pearl Street Triangle, Brooklyn. Inhabitant: Amelia Marzac
July 15 - 31: Snug Harbor, Staten Island. Inhabitant: Kelly Loudenberg
August 1 - 15: Bronx – Van Cortlandt Park. Inhabitants: Esteban Silva and Harley Aussoleil.

Flock House # 8 - Chromasphere:
June 27 – September 6: 125 Maiden Lane, Manhattan.  Inhabitant: Greg Lindquist.

Flock House #4 - Cocoon:
June: Rooftop, Downtown Brooklyn, NY. Inhabitant: Mary Mattingly
July 7 – September: Architecture Omi Sculpture Park, Ghent, NY.

This project is presented in conjunction with the support of generous sponsors.

Mark di Suvero, Mark di Suvero on Governors Island: presented by the Storm King Art Center
May 27, 2011 to September 25, 2011
Governor's Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

The exhibition is the largest outdoor presentation of Mark di Suvero’s sculptures to be shown in New York City since the 1970s and includes loans from public and private collections, including a number of sculptures from Storm King’s own celebrated installation of the artist’s work. The exhibition is free and located throughout the island’s vibrant public spaces.

For more information on events and exhibitions at Governor’s Island, visit the Trust for Governor’s Island. Learn more about the Storm King Art Center.

FIGMENT 2011, Bittertang, Burble Bup Pavilion
May 27, 2011 to September 25, 2011
Governor's Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
Come together in the Burble Bup Pavilion, winner of the second annual City of Dreams pavilion competition. Burble Bup invites people to lounge and mingle in its soft and magical interior, upon plush soil tubes. The City of Dreams pavilion competition is sponsored by FIGMENT, ENYA, and SEAoNY.

For more information on events and exhibitions at Governor’s Island, visit the Trust for Governor’s Island. Learn more about Figment www.figmentproject.org/pavilion.

FIGMENT 2011, Sculpture Garden
May 27, 2011 to September 25, 2011
Liggett Hall, Governor's Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:
The FIGMENT summer long sculpture garden is back! Engage with amazingly creative, interactive, and sustainable sculpture projects in the Liggett Hall courtyard. The FIGMENT Terrace Sculpture Garden is free.

For more information on events and exhibitions at Governor’s Island, visit the Trust for Governor’s Island, or learn more about Figment.

Speakers at LEAP's opening event in Union Square. Pictured above: LEAP students, Emma Amos, Sr. Counsel & Sr. Policy Advisor Wendy Gellman, NYC DOE Visual Arts Coordinator Karen Rosner, Audrey Flack, NYC School Chancellor Dennis M. Walcott, Commissioner of NYC Cultural Affairs Kate Levin, Christo, and Commissioner of NYC Parks Adrian Benepe

LEAP, A View from the Lunch Table: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
May 30, 2011 to August 26, 2011
Citywide

Please note: This is a past exhibit that is no longer installed in the park.

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program included visits with distinguished artists such as Emma Amos, Tom Otterness, Audrey Flack, Christo, Chuck Close, and Vito Acconci, among many others. For 33 years, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts–based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August at: Central Park and Sara D. Roosevelt Park in Manhattan; Ft. Greene Park and Sunset Park in Brooklyn; Crotona Park and Claremont Park in the Bronx; Juniper Valley Park and Forest Park in Queens; and Silver Lake Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

For more information visit the LEAP website.

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