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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Current Exhibits

Citywide

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Danh Vo, We The People
May 16, 2014 to December 5, 2014
City Hall Park, Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn

Description:

We the People is a life size copper replica of the statue in over 250 individual parts fabricated over the course of three years using the original techniques and materials. As a conceptual artist, Vo does not stipulate how many of the components should be shown together and refers to each presentation as a “detail” of the entire project. However, Public Art Fund’s exhibition featuring more than 50 pieces in Lower Manhattan’s City Hall Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park represents the largest public presentation of We the People to date. While components have been shown in exhibitions across the globe, this presentation of the work at two of New York City’s quintessential outdoor spaces invites audiences to consider the symbolic resonance of the Statue of Liberty in the city that is its home.

This is a project by the Public Art Fund.

Bronx

Courtesy of the Art Students League

Art Students League, Tree of Life
June 12, 2014 to June 1, 2015
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with NYC Parks that has culminated in the installation of the monumental sculpture, Tree of Life, at Van Cortlandt Park.

The sculpture was created by an international team of seven selected League students during a nine-month program. In its fourth year, ASL created worked closely with the naturalists from Van Cortlandt Park to identify specific invertibre that are native to the area. The information they discovered was used by the artists to recreate artistic interpretations of the specimens. These interpretations are attached to a 12 foot tree-like structure. Tree of Life will be an educational experience for park visitors. The artists are: Laura Barmack, Janet Fekete-Bolton, Ana Sofìa Martì, Lindsay McCosh, Phyllis Sanfiorenzo, Natsuki Takauji, and Minako Yoshino.

A collaborative installation created by the team is also on concurrently on view in Riverside South Park in Manhattan. This exhibition is presented with the Art Students League.

Brooklyn

Nick Hornby, Bird God Drone, Courtesy of the artist

Nick Hornby, Bird God Drone
November 1, 2013 to October 31, 2014
Clumber Corner, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

In Hornby’s Bird God Drone, the outline of Michelangelo’s David – one of the most famous and widely reproduced sculptures in the world – has been extruded vertically over 12 feet to converge at a single point. In Bird God Drone, the silhouette of David’s conquering and classical Renaissance body lies horizontally, flush with the ground, and visible from above: by workers peering out of windows, tourists crossing the Brooklyn Bridge, birds, gods, and drones.

The sculpture is robotically carved from a synthetic composite to the accuracy of a fraction of a millimeter. The figurative perfection of Michelangelo’s sculpture is juxtaposed against the Platonic ideal of geometry.

Hornby has derived his outline, not from the original marble carving, but from a white plaster copy from the late 1800s located in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Here, in Brooklyn, Hornby’s sculpture is repositioned in another historical moment of belief in technological progress. It is no longer God and nature alone that view from above, but also drones and satellites, the components of our industrialization of space.

Accompanying this sculpture is a video of the work shot from above by a surveillance drone. The sculpture is designed specifically for this bird’s-eye view, inverting the ‘man on a plinth’ monument which is traditionally viewed from below. The video will be available on YouTube, accessible via smart-phones, and disseminated by social media, revealing Michelangelo’s outline dropped like a Google pin point (the hallmark of contemporary travel) in the urban landscape. www.birdgoddrone.com

This exhibition is presented by Two Trees Management Co.

Gilberto Aceves Navarro, Las Bicicletas
July 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014
Bartel-Pritchard Square, Brooklyn
Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn
Fruit Street Sitting Area, Brooklyn
Trinity Park, Brooklyn
Valentino Pier, Brooklyn

Description:

This summer, Las Bicicletas celebrates both art and bicycle riding in one of the most important cultural hubs of the world. Aceves Navarro said his inspiration for the bicycles came from a growing need for alternative transportation, especially in urban spaces. He also refers to the structures as “vehicles of happiness and health.”

One hundred twenty-two “bicicletas&rquo; sculptures will be installed in ten public spaces throughout Brooklyn and lower Manhattan from July through September. The public will be encouraged to visit the exhibit on bicycle, following a route of approximately ten miles of bicycle lanes and paths.

For a full list of sites please visit Las Bicicletas.

This project is in partnership with the New York City Department of Transportation.

Manhattan

Image Courtesy of the artist

Jarrod Beck, Uplift
August 20, 2014 to August 19, 2015
Sara D. Roosevelt Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Uplift sits on a tree–lined terrace in Sara D. Roosevelt Park. Made from recycled rubber conveyor belts once used to cart ore out of West Virginia mines, the work suggests stratified rock or a grouping of recently unearthed tectonic plates. Uplift is both memorial and artifact, reminding us of loss, but also rooted in a deep time beyond our memories.

Phyllis Sanfiorenzo, Atabey's Land Haven, photo courtesy of NYC Parks

Art Students League, Model to Monument (M2M)
June 12, 2014 to May 15, 2015
Riverside Park South, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation that has culminated in the installation of seven sculptures on view along Riverside Park South from 59th to 69th Streets.

The sculptures were created by an international team of selected League students during a nine-month program. The pieces for this exhibition explore “The Architecture of Nature.”  The artists are: Laura Barmack, Janet Fekete-Bolton, Ana Sofìa Martì, Lindsay McCosh, Phyllis Sanfiorenzo, Natsuki Takauji, and Minako Yoshino.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program and the Riverside Park Fund.

Jim Rennert, THINK BIG
June 3, 2014 to May 4, 2015
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Jim Rennert’s THINK BIG stands at over 12-feet tall serving as an inspiration to everyone who works hard every day to achieve their dreams and goals. The monumental businessman gazes up at the sky and the Manhattan skyline, reminding us that if we “think big” we can attain anything and that the American Dream is still very much alive and possible. Businessman or not, everyone can still relate to the themes in their own personal ways. THINK BIG is the culmination of positive thinking, as the original concept started as a two-inch sculpture. Rennert is excited to bring the sculpture to New York so that everyone can indeed, “think big.”

The project is made possible by the Cavalier Gallery and Union Square Partnership.

Isabelle Cornaro, God Box (column), courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Archeo
April 17, 2014 to March, 2015
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

An outdoor group exhibition about technology and obsolescence, Archeo brings together the work of artists who employ outmoded technologies and outdated machinery as a reflection on humanity’s continuous fascination and frustration with technology.

Today, many young artists engage with technology by exposing both its fragilities and merits. Their artworks embody an attitude that is simultaneously critical and nostalgic, in which the optimistic idealism of technological progress is countered by a disenchanted skepticism. Some of the works in the exhibition describe a recent past which resembles a dystopian future, featuring a wasteland of discarded machines and castaway objects. Other artists are more enthusiastic about the potential of technology but warn us against its dangerous side effects and its planned obsolescence. Some of the artworks on view disclose a return to the handmade and an attraction to organic forms and materials. These sculptures resemble relics and findings of an archaeology of the future.

Archeo features international artists including: Antoine Catala, Isabelle Cornaro, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Yngve Holen, Gavin Kenyon, Josh Kline, Marianne Vitale

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Chuck Ginnever, Medusa, 1986

Charles Ginnever, Medusa and High Rise
December 6, 2013 to November 30, 2014
Riverside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Charles Ginnever’s piece Medusa (1986) is located at 145th Street in Riverside Park and echoes his sculpture High Rise, sited on a neighboring lawn.   This exhibition marks Ginnever’s return to Parks, having exhibited in Carl Schurz Park in 1967 as part of Sculpture in Environment, one of the city’s first public art exhibitions. Charles Ginnever was born in San Mateo, CA in 1931. He is best known for his large-scale, open form works for the outdoors. He created the first of these in 1958 with abandoned railroad ties and structural steel. The result was a deconstruction of prevailing sculptural spatial concepts that he continues to examine. A contemporary of Mark di Suvero and Richard Serra, who also exhibit monumental steel pieces,  Ginnever’s sculptures have a trick of the eye and appear to warp as someone looks at the pieces from different angles.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Dean Monogenis, City Pillars, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 2014 to November 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

Monogenis’s City Pillars is comprised of seven striped rectilinear forms in varying dimensions, hovering just above the ground along the southern shoreline of Randall’s Island Park. Five vertical structures represent the boroughs of New York City and two horizontal forms will represent the East and Hudson Rivers. The work begins with the concept of the genius loci: originating in classical Rome, the term describes the protective spirit or divine guardian of a place. In Southeast Asia, similar shrines or “city pillars” are vertical, totemic monuments, dedicated to the specific deity of a location. FLOW.14 also includes Robert Raphael’s Untitled Folly, Jessica Sander’s Ground, andKant Smith’s Ghost House.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Kant Smith, Ghost House, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 2014 to November 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

Smith’s Ghost House sits on a bluff overlooking the Wards Meadow Fields at Randall’s Island Park. Constructed entirely of chain link fence, the sculpture will translate the vernacular of the baseball backstop into an ethereal and slightly surreal contemplation of the American home. FLOW.14 also includes Dean Monogenis’ City Pillars, Robert Raphael’s Untitled Folly, andJessica Sanders’ Ground.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Jessica Sanders, Ground, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 2014 to November 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

To install Ground, Sanders created ten sculpted earth chairs, in a variety of forms, within sight of one another along the coastline of Randall’s Island Park. The chairs are bound by Kentucky Bluegrass, chosen for its suitability to the Island’s ground and climate, as well as for its balance of softness and durability. The installation offers an unmitigated phenomenological experience, the opportunity to interact with a living material in a simultaneously nostalgic and atypical way. FLOW.14 also includes Dean Monogenis’ City Pillars, Robert Raphael’s Untitled Folly, andKant Smith’s Ghost House.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Culture Council

Chat Traviesio with Yeju Choi, On a Fence
July 12, 2014 to November 30, 2014
Pier 42, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance & Lower Manhattan Cultural Council invited artists and design professionals to participate in a community-driven, site-responsive design process for the temporary activation of Pier 42 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Travieso’s project On a Fence expands on his 2013 Pier 42 project, which transforms the fence surrounding Pier 42 into an interactive structure incorporating seating, play areas, and signage. The project seeks to invert the function and meaning of the fence from a physical barrier to a place where people can come together. This year, On a Fence will be expanded to occupy the entire length of the fence on the Northern side of the park, incorporating new programming that complements the previous installation.

On a Fence acts as a testing ground and incubator for more permanent solutions that can be incorporated into the final design of the Pier 42 Park. Local residents participate in the planning and design process of On a Fence and assist in its construction on site.

For more information on the project please visit Paths to Pier 42.

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Culture Council

Combo Colab + Stereotank, DrumReef 42
July 12, 2014 to November 30, 2014
Pier 42, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance & Lower Manhattan Cultural Council invited artists and design professionals to participate in a community-driven, site-responsive design process for the temporary activation of Pier 42 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Combo Colab + Stereotank’s project DrumReef 42 re-envisions the topography of Pier 42 and builds a participatory installation that creates awareness about current environmental concerns. Made from multiple re-used plastic barrels, the drum-formation is a structure that can be used to climb, rest, play, and explore new connections to the river and the park.

Combo Colab conceived the installation as a social sculpture that uses existing resources, low-cost materials, and pre-fabricated systems. It can be read as an inhabitable barrier that also acts as an island for play, incorporating interactive elements to engage visitors. Sound-making features by Stereotank promote a participative mood creating awareness about water and marine life. DrumReef 42 is an experiment on subjects that are relevant to the site, the neighborhood, and its condition in proximity to the water.

For more information on the project please visit Paths to Pier 42.

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Culture Council

Sonia Louise Davis, The People’s Poster Project
July 12, 2014 to November 30, 2014
Pier 42, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance & Lower Manhattan Cultural Council invited artists and design professionals to participate in a community-driven, site-responsive design process for the temporary activation of Pier 42 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. Artists and designers were asked to propose ideas for cultural activity including temporary public art, small-scale interventions, programming and event spaces that directly engage the site and community in which the pier is located.

Davis’ project The People’s Poster Project redefines the notion of a time capsule. Instead of burying something in the ground to be excavated thousands of years in the future, the project aims to activate a more reflective space that highlights individual stories of Lower East Side residents within public dialogue about the future of Pier 42.

The project consists of workshops and conversations about what matters most to Lower East Side community members. Working with a range of community groups, from youth to elders, Davis will facilitate large format photographic portraits, inviting neighbors to pose with an object from their personal archive and recount its significance. Throughout the summer they will create and install posters in local community spaces and businesses around the neighborhood, and on Pier 42, culminating in a completed outdoor exhibition in September.

For more information on the project please visit Paths to Pier 42.

Photo courtesy of LMCC

Tattfoo Tan, New Earth Apocalypse Knowledge Advancement (NEAKA)
July 12, 2014 to November 30, 2014
Pier 42, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Lower East Side Waterfront Alliance & Lower Manhattan Cultural Council invited artists and design professionals to participate in a community-driven, site-responsive design process for the temporary activation of Pier 42 on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

Tan’s project New Earth Apocalypse Knowledge Advancement (NEAKA) is a metal key frame catamaran that will be installed on Pier 42 and ceremonially christened with salt in late July. The artist sees the vessel as a spiritual reminder of an uncertain future due to societal collapse (population, climate, water, agriculture and energy) and a call to action in preparation to face such challenges. NEAKA also serves as a vitrine for NEMRE (New Earth Meal Ready to Eat), a part of Tan’s ongoing social practice project, through which he inspires others to practice the ancient food preservation technique of dehydration, not only to help prepare for future disaster, but to provide nutritious meals in the present, knowing every ingredient and wasting none.

For more information on the project please visit Paths to Pier 42.

Gimhongsok, Bearlike Construction, Photo Courtesy of NYC Parks

Gimhongsok, Bearlike Construction
May 5, 2014 to November 21, 2014
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Humorous and ironic, Gimhongsok’s work challenges the viewer to consider the contradictions and blurred boundaries of fact and fiction, originality and the copy, banality and the spectacular. He often uses everyday materials to engage his audience in a dialogue about preconceived and conventional values found in communities and in art. In Bearlike Construction, the form is immediately recognizable as a teddy bear, but is assembled out of cast bronze garbage bags rather than the conventional soft fur. The piece, which measures over five feet square also wittily echoes the ubiquitous piles of garbage bags found on street corners throughout New York City.

Courtesy of the artist

Rudy Shepherd, Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber
May 22, 2014 to November 15, 2014
First Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber is from a series of sculptures Rudy Shepherd has been working on since 2006, the first having been installed in Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, NY. Shepherd describes the Black Rock Negative Energy Absorbers as a group of sculptures with magical functions: to expunge negative energy from viewers – in the form of prejudice, racism, or even quotidian disdain – and allow them to respond to life with the more open, compassionate, and positive aspects of their personalities. The series reinterprets practices culled from new age mythology and ancient religions to heal the negative energies in society.

The exhibition is brought to you by First Street Green.

Juanli Carrion, Outer Seed Shadow #01
June 4, 2014 to November 15, 2014
Duarte Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Outer Seed Shadow #01 was conceived by Spanish artist Juanli Carrión in 2012 when after years of living in New York he started to consider permanent residence in the United States. He wanted to revisit the long-established idea of the American “melting pot” and investigate the new realities of immigrant life in 2014, particularly in New York, the most symbolic of immigrant cities. Carrión conducted a series of on-camera interviews with immigrants living throughout Manhattan about their personal experiences of arriving to the city. At the end of the discussion, each interviewee selected a plant that exists both in their country of origin and in the United States, which represents both them and their community in the public garden.

The 1,000 square foot garden is in the shape of Manhattan and features dozens of plants selected by immigrants living in the borough. Placed according to the interviewees’ real-life locations on the island, the plants represent the diversity of the city. The garden will host a series of free public programs beginning June 7 that includes artist-led tours, lectures, hands-on garden workshops and “Open Garden” days. For the complete schedule of programming visit: www.outerseedshadow.org/public-program.

This project is in partnership with the Horticultural Society of New York

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Ewerdt Hilgemann, Moments in a Stream
August 1, 2014 to November 7, 2014
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Hilgemann’s installation, Moments in a Stream, will parade along the avenue in seven locations, from 52nd Street to 67th Street, with large-scale pieces—some in groups of two or more—placed on the grassy medians. The seven sculptures, ranging in size from 8 to 20 feet in height, were created especially for the Park Avenue installation using a unique vacuum process, which “implodes” geometric shapes causing the material to deform according to natural laws.

Hilgemann’s “implosion” process begins by fabricating perfect, geometrically pure stainless steel forms, which are meticulously welded and polished to satin gloss. After the pieces are complete, the artist slowly pulls the air out with a vacuum pump, putting the natural atmospheric pressure to sculptural use and collapsing the forms into their final shape. In a delicate balance of planning and chance each piece acquires individual character demonstrating unexpected and striking possibilities of the material.

Sculpture locations include Cube Flower at 52nd-53rd Street; Threesome (Caryatids) at 54th Street, Triple at 57th Street; Dancers (Tango) at 59th Street; Double at 64th Street; Cube at 65th Street and Habakuk at 67th Street.

This exhibition is presented by The Fund For Park Avenue and Magnan Metz Gallery.

Olaf Breuning, Clouds
March 4, 2014 to October 19, 2014
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
?Olaf Breuning’s largest public art installation in the United States to date, the work features six clouds rendered as childlike drawings made of polished blue aluminum towering nearly 35 feet above the plaza and mounted on seemingly makeshift steel supports. Blending reality with fiction and refined forms with a do-it-yourself aesthetic, this new work is a whimsical addition to the Midtown Manhattan skyline.

This exhibition is presented by the Public Art Fund

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

Caraballo-Farman, The Signs of Paradise
June 20, 2014 to October 10, 2014
Battery Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Since 1886, the Statue of Liberty has invited immigrants from across the world to seek out their own piece of worldly paradise here in the United States. Today, each of the 50 states has its own town called “Paradise.” With this installation, celebrated artist Caraballo-Farman offers visitors to Battery Park directions and distances to each of the 50 Paradises within eye-shot of Lady Liberty.

The exhibition is brought to you by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas, Arch III
May 2014 to September 2014
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Strong-Cuevas, whose work has been acclaimed by critics around the world and whose powerful, dramatic sculptures are in numerous public and private collections internationally, is exhibiting a large bronze, ARCH III, at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza. The arch is a symbolic gateway to peace and cooperation represented by the United Nations, which is at the east end of 47 Street.

Joshua Ruff, the Long Island Museum’s Director of Collections and Interpretations, wrote: “The monumental scale of her sculptures holds their own. But regardless of size, Strong-Cuevas’ art has an enormous, captivating grip... [her] work is both thought-provoking and energetic, the result of many years of careful and inspired artistic evolution and wonderfully diverse influences...Her work really must be seen and enjoyed in person for a full appreciation.”

Queens

Various, Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition
September 7, 2014 to March 22, 2015
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Artists: Matt Callinan, Jordan Griska, Meredith James, Fitzhugh Karol, Lilian Kreutzberger, Zaq Landsberg, Heidi Lau, Amanda Long, Christopher Mahonski, Kimberly Mayhorn, Eto Otitigbe, Brie Ruais, Edward Schexnayder, David Wilson, Dane Winkler

The annual Emerging Artist Fellowship (EAF) Exhibition is a cornerstone of Socrates Sculpture Park’s visual arts programming and is widely acclaimed for the ambition, breadth, and innovation of the works on view. Featuring fifteen artists, EAF14 is a survey of the compelling and diverse state of sculpture today.

Each EAF14 artist has engaged with the larger narrative of public space in a dynamic and daring way, building upon Socrates Sculpture Park’s goal to present socially aware, inspiring art in the public realm. EAF14 artists were selected through a high competitive process that attracted a broad field of nearly 300 candidates, reviewed by the park’s curatorial advisors Anne Barlow (Executive Director, Art in General) and Joe Sheftel (Joe Sheftel Gallery, New York). Selected EAF14 artists were awarded a 2014 Emerging Artist Fellowship, including 24/7 access to the park’s outdoor studio and facilities, as well as the financial, technical, and curatorial support to realize his or her most ambitious work possible.

This project is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park

Kate Gilmore, Wall Bearer
September 7, 2014 to March 22, 2015
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Kate Gilmore’s sculptural and performance-based works raise questions about feminine identity and contemporary power dynamics. Wall Bearer, the park’s current Broadway Billboard, is documentation from the eponymous performance at The Weatherspoon Art Museum in Greensboro North Carolina in 2011. For that project, six performers, dressed in identical pink outfits, stood in individual alcoves within a matching pink wall.Ã??Ã? The performers, all women, stood perfectly still for three hour stretches, during which time visitors to the exhibition could walk through the space, viewing the performance as a still-life or a sculpture to be briefly admired.

In Wall Bearer, the live female body is transformed into a sculptural element, referencing 1970’s performance art and later feminist artworks.Ã??Ã? Here Gilmore presents a parade of pink and a rotating cast of all-female performers. The pink’s Pepto-Bismol-like hue borders on saccharine and feels imposed and thus unattractively burdensome for each woman. Camouflaged, anonymous, and uncomfortable, each woman may be a column of support and essential to the overall tableau, but she is also easily overlooked, suggesting that there is more than a physical wall to be overcome.

This project is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park

Courtesy of the artist

Bundith Phunsombatlert, Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures
May 15, 2014 to November 15, 2014
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures is a site-specific project that invites the public to embark on guided journeys through NYC to find public sculptures. Phunsombatlert researched all existing public sculptures in New York City and identified 100 sites to be incorporated in his final work. He then created small drawings of each sculpture and developed directional signs and maps that resemble standard U.S. National Park Service signage. The artwork is made up of signage for 100 public sculptures that contain distances drawn from GPS coordinates between each sculpture and the group of wooden posts outside of the Queens Museum at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

The project is made possible by the generosity of the Athena Foundation, Awesome Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Location One, New York Foundation for the Arts’ Opportunity Grants, Puffin Foundation, Ltd., Puffin Foundation West, Ltd., Socrates Sculpture Park, Mark di Suvero, Anne Dunning, Rob Herschenfeld, James T. MacGregor & Claire Montgomery, Ivana Mestrovic, and Jan Mun.

Staten Island

DB Lampman, The Dance, Photo Courtesy of the Artist

DB Lampman, The Dance
September 15, 2014 to September 14, 2015
Tappen Park, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Dance consists of five figures floating 15 feet above the ground. The figures, formed with steel and wrapped in nylon, hold hands and dance whimsically within a rectangular steel structure.  At night the figures light up and cast a glow around the neighboring trees. The Dance is inspired by Henri Matisse’s painting by the same name. Similar interlocked figures can be found throughout art history, including Mayan art, African tribal sculptures, and ancient Mesopotamia, among others, to symbolize family, community, and spiritual or universal connectivity. Lampman uses this symbol for the coming together of the Staten Island community.

Lampman lives and works in Stapleton and has embraced the diverse community made up of residents from around the world. There is a large population from Shri Lanka, as well as immigrants from Liberia, Ghana, the Gold Coast, Mexico, and Central and South America.  In the exhibition, the five figures are entwined in a dance—they could be Flamenco dancers from Mexico, Kandyan dancers from Sri Lanka, or  a dance from West Africa such as the Yankadi, or the Makru.

Tappen Park and many other Staten Island neighborhoods were flooded during Hurricane Sandy, and sadly lives and homes were lost in the storm.  However, Staten Island came together during this crisis—strangers dropped everything and join people from around the island and all over the world to rebuild the community.  The neighborhood’s joint effort is an integral part of the inspiration for Lampman’s public artwork.  Additionally, Lampman hopes that the installation will inspire additional community development, as the informal pavilion can be used for public dance and music performances by community members.

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