NYC Resources 311 Office of the Mayor

Official Website of the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation

Search Current and Past Exhibits

  to  

Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Current Exhibits

Bronx

Chat Travieso,Boogie Down Booth
June 25, 2015 to June 24, 2016
Seabury Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Boogie Down Booth, a colorful new public installation bringing Bronx music, solar–powered lights, seating, and community art to the area under the elevated tracks is on view at Seabury park on Southern Boulevard and 174th Street in the Bronx. The second Boogie Down Booth follows last year’s temporary pop–up at Southern Boulevard and Freeman Street, under the 2/5 line.

This new rendition features an updated, linear design from Chat Travieso, designer of the first Booth. Like the previous installation, the Booth provides seating, solar–powered LED lighting, and speakers streaming music from Bronx artists. The playlist, curated by the Bronx Music Heritage Center, covers a variety of genres born in or inspired by the Bronx, including salsa, jazz, Afro–Caribbean, hip–hop, Garifuna, and blues.

New to this booth are interactive elements like a community bulletin board to learn about local events, and a mural wall painted by middle and high school students from East Bronx Academy for the Future and youth from the Children’s Aid Society, who will host community events at the Booth. The installation, which recycles much of the material from the previous Booth, will be open until July 2016.

This exhibition is presented by WHEDco and the Bronx Music Heritage Center.

The Art Students League of New York,Water, Gift of life
June 11, 2015 to June 10, 2016
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with NYC Parks that has culminated in the installation the sculpture, Water, Gift of Life, at Van Cortlandt Park.

In response to this year’s theme of Patterns in Nature, the artists created a sinuous steel twisted sculpture. The fluke of a tail runs down like a rolling wave and culminates to form the head of a water drop. The downward flow of the fish-wave form echoes the landscape of the hill of the Van Cortlandt House Museum, which drops quickly down a Southward hill, and the south-running Tibbett’s Brook through Van Cortlandt Park down to the City.

The shiny stainless-steel sculpture reflects the park in a similar way that water’s surface reflects the surrounding trees. Additionally the sculpture is a nod to the water sources that surrounds the piece–the Nature Center to the North which provides an exploratory, scientific perspective of the parks ecosystems. To the West, the Pool is run with engineered water systems. By contrast, Van Cortland Lake is located to the east and wetlands to the south.

This collaborative installation was created by artists Lee Apt, Caroline Bergonzi, Kate Jansyn, Sukyung Kim, Donat King, Paola Morales, and Ken Shih. The group also has works concurrently on view in Riverside South Park in Manhattan.

This exhibition is presented with the Art Students League.

Gaston Lachaise, Long-Tailed Peacock and Short-Tailed Peacock

Gaston Lachaise,Long-Tailed Peacock and Short-Tailed Peacock
May 7, 2015 to May 7, 2016
Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum
Pelham Bay Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

These elegant and graceful peacocks designed in 1920 were intended for a formal garden such as that on the grounds of the Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum. The garden was conceived and constructed circa 1916 by the prominent architectural firm of Delano & Aldrich and recently restored in 2013.

Animals were a theme to which Lachaise returned throughout his artistic career. He sculpted peacocks, seagulls; swans, dolphins. The animals he chose to represent were generally peaceful animals. The commissions for his animal works came through his employer, the artist, Paul Manship (1885-1956) or architects with whom he worked, including Welles Bosworth (1868-1966) and Philip Goodwin (1885-1958).

In the case of the short-tailed peacock, John Deering commissioned Lachaise in 1920 to make two sculptural peacocks in stone to sit atop eight decorative spiral columns in the Marine Garden of the home he was building outside of Miami, called Vizcaya. Philip Goodwin commissioned the long-tailed peacock for a fountain on the wall of his mansion on Long Island. In a poetic twist, Goodwin worked for Delano & Aldrich between 1914-1916.

This exhibition is presented by the Lachaise Foundation, the Bartow-Pell Mansion Museum and the Historic House Trust.

Brooklyn

Ruth Hofheimer, Lenape Variations, Photo by the artist

Ruth Hofheimer,Lenape Variations
November 15, 2015 to November 15, 2016
Washington Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Ruth Hofheimer’s design contains imagery of the Lenape tribe that once inhabited the Brooklyn area, as well as native plant life and abstract forms. These elements are rendered in a flat style to evoke Native American art and pattern which was typically flat and symbolic.

This project is presented by Arts Gowanus  and the Old Stone House & Washington Park

Photo credit: Etienne Frossard

Deborah Kass,OY/YO
November 11, 2015 to August, 2016
Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Walking the line between respectful homage and brazen appropriation, Brooklyn-based artist Deborah Kass mimics and reworks the signature styles of iconic 20th century male artists —including Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock, Ed Ruscha, and Robert Indiana – often with a feminist twist. OY/YO is sourced from urban and Brooklyn slang, the statement “I am” in Spanish, and the popular Yiddish expression, as a riff on Ruscha’s iconic word paintings.

OY/YO has been a significant and reoccurring motif in Kass’ work since its first appearance in 2011, taking form in paintings, prints, and tabletop sculptures. Set alongside the iconic bridges of Brooklyn’s waterfront and visible to viewers from Manhattan, Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Main Street lawn is an apt location for a monumental installation of OY/YO. Similar to the City of New York’s “Leaving Brooklyn: Oy Vey!” sign at the Williamsburg Bridge and the “Leaving Brooklyn: Fuhgeddaboudit” sign on the BQE, OY/YO references Brooklyn’s ethnic communities with whimsy and warmth.

Commissioned by Two Trees and presented in partnership with Brooklyn Bridge Park, the work will be on view through August 2016 and is presented on the occasion of the artist’s exhibition No Kidding opening at Paul Kasmin Gallery in Chelsea December 9, 2015. For more information about this artwork, please visit the Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy’s website.

Michael Clyde Johnson, Untitled Benches, Patios, Planters in Arrangement (Parklet for Ennis Playground), photograph by Patryce Bak

Michael Clyde Johnson,Untitled Benches, Patios, Planters in Arrangement (Parklet for Ennis Playground)
August 31, 2015 to August 30, 2016
Ennis Playground, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

As a parklet within a park, the goal of Untitled Benches, Patios, Planters in Arrangement (Parklet for Ennis Playground) is to provide additional public amenities to Ennis Playground, and by extension to the wider Gowanus neighborhood. These amenities are multi-faceted: the project includes three modular components – patios, benches, and planters – which, when combined, serve to create additional distinct lounge and play areas within the park. By extending the idea of a parklet – generally conceived as an extension of sidewalk space into the street to provide additional seating and green space – to encompass the extension of these same functions within an existing public space, Parklet for Ennis Playground serves to augment existing facilities.

This project was made possible with funding from Councilmember Brad Lander, in partnership with Arts Gowanus and the Old Stone House & Washington Park

Manhattan

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Blind Idealism Is...), 2016

Barbara Kruger,Untitled (Blind Idealism Is...)
March 21,2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan

Description:

Barbara Kruger is an American artist who works with pictures and words. Kruger uses the fluency she developed as a graphic designer for publications such Mademoiselle, House & Garden, and Aperture, to inform her work as an artist, insistently addressing the issues of power, property, money, race, and sexuality. Over the past three decades her work has ranged from the photographic merging of image and text, to immersive video installations, to room-wrapping textual exhibitions, to large-scale outdoor displays of words and images. Two of her best-known works – Your body is a battleground and I shop therefore I am – also showcase the feminist overtones of her artworks, and her concentration on women as a lucrative site for advertising and consumerism.

For the High Line, Kruger presents Untitled (Blind Idealism Is…), a new work realized as a hand-painted mural. Continuing her unabashed criticism of culture and power, the mural features the slogan “BLIND IDEALISM IS REACTIONARY SCARY DEADLY,” an adaptation of a quote from Afro-Caribbean philosopher and revolutionary thinker Frantz Fanon, which has appeared in multiple works by the artist. The original statement by Fanon, “Blind idealism is reactionary,” suggests that political and religious convictions stem from the situations from which they grow, not from the inherent nature of individual human beings. According to Kruger, the work reflects “how we are to one another” within “the days and nights that construct us.” These texts, along with Kruger’s own writings, resonate with particular potency in today’s political climate.

Dee Briggs, 6 Plates, 5' x 10' x .5

Dee Briggs,Dee Briggs in Foley Square
April 11, 2016 to March 31, 2017
Thomas Paine Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Dee Briggs’ three new sculptures for Dee Briggs in Foley Square directly address her fascination with geometry and the particular operation of symmetry called chirality or three-dimensional handedness. Chirality is defined by a three dimensional entity that has no internal plane of symmetry along the x, y or z-axis.

Briggs states that her work “grows out of mathematics and architecture – geometry, symmetry and rhythm – line, plane and volume – visual perception and spatial understanding. They are three-dimensional patterns that are at once familiar and foreign. Heavy forms that imply weightlessness creating a tempting and engaging spatial experience.”

Nari Ward,Smart Tree
April 2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Inspired by a building adjacent to the High Line that had been transformed into an indoor parking lot, Nari Ward reconfigures a memory from his childhood for his High Line Commission, Smart Tree. Returning to his father’s home in Jamaica after fifteen years away, Ward remembers finding one of two abandoned cars in the front yard sprouting a lime tree. He reimagines this fantastical story for the High Line in the form of a Smart car refinished with strips of tire treads and propped up on cinder blocks. In place of a lime tree, Smart Tree will feature an apple tree growing out of its roof, adapted out of necessity for its North American context. With the car’s cinderblock base representing stasis, and its coating of tire treads suggesting perpetual movement, Ward’s Smart Tree holds up a mirror to the flux surrounding the High Line itself and reminds viewers of the High Line’s history as a major transportation artery in Manhattan.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Kathryn Andrews,Sunbathers I & II
May 2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

For the High Line, Kathryn Andrews presents her first public art commission, responding to two contrasting aspects of the elevated park: its relationship to nearby billboards and to the natural landscape. Andrews describes the High Line’s environment as a “hyper-surreal image world,” composed of large-scale advertisements and commercial signs that surround park visitors as they stroll high above the bustling cityscape. Andrews notes, by contrast, that the High Line’s physical design offers visitors a chance to develop awareness of the body in relation to extreme natural weather conditions including intense winds, rain, snow, and sun.

Andrews’s first sculpture, Sunbathers I, is a towering box-like structure, silkscreened with a black-and-white stock image of a public beach sign that announces, “Beyond This Point You May Encounter Nude Sunbathers.” Installed at West 18th Street, the sculpture houses misting nozzles that spray water intermittently at passers-by. Placing this work on the High Line, where nudity is not allowed draws attention to the more risqué social mores displayed on nearby billboards. The second sculpture, Sunbathers II, installed under The Standard, High Line, is a large, horizontal aluminum box containing a giant fan and featuring a photograph of an ice cream cone. The fan’s movement is juxtaposed with the adjacent static image, mirroring the park itself.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Various Artist,Wanderlust
April 21, 2016 to March 2017
The High Line, Manhattan

Description:

Wanderlust is a group exhibition that explores the themes of walking, journeys, and pilgrimages. Inspired by the High Line as an ambulatory space experienced most naturally in motion, Wanderlust extends the tradition of Conceptual art wherein the act of walking served as an inspiration for many artists who explored life both in the urban context and in an ambivalent confrontation with nature.

On the High Line, itself an urban promenade that combines nature and architecture, the act of walking is both celebrated and taken for granted. Wanderlust invites viewers to remember the many implications of the journeys and walks they take every day, placing them within a secular tradition that expands beyond art into both everyday life and our shared cultural histories.

Wanderlust will feature eleven international artists: Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Valentin Carron, Iman Issa, Matt Johnson, Marie Lorenz, Tony Matelli, Paulo Nazareth, Mike Neslon, Roman Ondak, Susan Philipsz, and Rayyane Tabet.

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Suprina Kenney,DNA Totem
March 28, 2016 to September 30, 2016
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The DNA Totem is a 10’ tall spiral in the shape of a DNA helix that is embedded with detritus and discarded items donated by community residents as well as found objects from the artist. The looming structure serves as an historical reference to human evolution and the footprint humans leave behind. The DNA Totem will be on view on the southern overlook terrace near the Fifth Avenue and 120th Street entrance to Marcus Garvey Park, a historic Harlem park located at the intersection of East and Central Harlem just 10 blocks north of Museum Mile.

According to the artist, “The DNA Totem is meant to bring up for discussion the seemingly unconscious disregard for how we affect our planet. I do this by showing a very small sampling of unwanted objects on the iconic, universal structure that is life itself; the DNA strand. Even though this symbol represents all living things, we have forced our compulsion for ‘the next best thing’ onto all others we share this planet with, usually with bad result. Using visual mapping I celebrate us, and our absurdity. We are beautiful, horrid, tragic, and profoundly funny.”

This exhibition is presented by the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance and Art in FLUX.

Isa Genzken, Two Orchids, photo by NYC Parks

Isa Genzken,Two Orchids
March 1, 2016 to August 21, 2016
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Once a rare and exotic flower, the orchid has become one of the world’s most ubiquitous indoor plants. From corporate offices to domestic interiors, from upscale florists to Home Depot, this tropical plant can now be seen anywhere–and acquired by anybody. It’s a striking and decorative flower without any dominant symbolism, except perhaps a hint of luxury left over from the 19th century when orchids were seen as “the chosen ornaments of royalty.”

For eminent German artist Isa Genzken, the mass-produced white orchid has become the quintessential flower of our age: global, accessible, and open to interpretation. Rising to 28 and 34 feet respectively, the paired stems of Genzken’s towering sculpture wind elegantly skyward, capturing light and casting shadows in a play of rhyming forms. Two Orchids heralds the entrance to Central Park in voluptuous full flower, its pristine white petals free from any blemishes. It stands as an idealized, colossal version of the familiar plant: a civic monument to the perfect orchid, now the chosen ornament of contemporary culture.

This exhibition is presented with the Public Art Fund

Tom Friedman, Looking Up; photo by Daniel Avila, NYC Parks

Tom Friedman,Looking Up
January 28, 2016 to July 2016
Park Avenue Malls at 53rd Street
Park Avenue Malls, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Looking Up, a 33.3-foot-tall stainless steel sculpture by the American artist Tom Friedman, is by far the most ambitious sculpture from Friedman’s ongoing body of work involving the use of crushed aluminum foil roasting-pans to create figures, which, through a process of molding and lost wax casting, retain the original material’s imprint and markings. A charming yet magnificent piece, the quasi-human figure gazes up to the heavens, inviting others to stand at its base and do the same. The first example of this edition is permanently installed at the Laguna Gloria Campus of The Contemporary Austin in Texas.

This exhibition is presented with Luhring Augustine, New York; Stephen Friedman Gallery, London; NYC Parks; and the Fund for Park Avenue.

Eirini Linardaki, Whattoseesottahw, photo courtesy of the artist

Eirini Linardaki,Whattoseesottahw
August 15, 2015 to July 7, 2016
Tompkins Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Eirini Linardaki’s public art installation Whattoseesottahw is inspired by children’s drawings created during artist-led workshops in the park. Her work often concentrates on creating beautiful, unexpected moments within urban and abandoned spaces. As a resident of the East Village, she continues this exploration inher installation Whattoseesottahw, where sheembraces the often ambiguous nature of children’s drawings. In her workshops, children and families visiting Tompkins Square were encouraged to create images of familiar wildlife that they encountered in the park. These drawings and paintings may appear indecipherable at a first glance, similar to a Rorschach test; however, when children are asked to elaborate they create joyful stories about the natural elements they observed.

Several of these drawings were collected and combined to create images that were transferred onto wood panels. The images were then either cut out of the panel, revealing glances of the park, or partially removed with half of the drawing still visible. Some of the cutouts were painted with chalk paint so kids can complete the drawing. The panels, located in the Slocum Memorial Fountain Plaza, are low on the fence in order to maintain a relationship with children’s eye level. Linardaki will periodically conduct workshops throughout the exhibition in the sitting area behind the park house.

All of the paintings that inspire the installation will be uploaded to her website.

Petros Chrisostomou,Sky Feather
June 11, 2015 to June 10, 2016
Riverside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Petros Chrisostomou’s sculpture Sky Feather, Located at the Riverside Park Bird Sanctuary at 116th Street, aims to bring awareness to this vibrant, natural bird community.Ã? Sky Feather, formerly exhibited at 124th Street and Lennox Avenue, will act as a meeting point in the park and a point of discussion amongst park visitors and birders. Though feathers appear fragile and weightless, sculpture was fabricated with stained and sealed birch plywood and stands at 12 feet tall.Ã? He notes that a feather is the symbolic remains of a journey or flight. Bird migration gracefully parallels the journey taken by people around the world. The diversity of New York City makes it an interesting and fertile arena for this homage to cultural diversity and migration. He also hopes that the sculpture will draw people from other neighborhoods to the park, adding an additional layer of movement.

The Riverside Park Bird Sanctuary runs from 116th Street to 124th Street. Since 1997, the approximately 10 acres of the Sanctuary have been undergoing reforestation, and over 3,000 plants have been added. In the last thirty years 177 species of birds have been seen in or around the Sanctuary, with a yearly average of about 120 species. Visitors can expect to see the blue grosbeak, summer tanager, hooded warbler, mourning warbler and nine species of sparrows, among others. For more information on the Bird Sanctuary and optimal birding times visit NYC Audubon’s website.

Summer on the Hudson, the NYC Parks’ annual outdoor arts and culture festival in Riverside Park, will organize an artist talk with Chrisostomou and a bird walk in conjunction with this exhibition. Program dates will be listed on the Summer on the Hudson website.

This exhibition was kindly supported by the Riverside Park Conservancy and the International Studio & Curatorial Program (ISCP).

Mike Whiting, Bomber, Photo by NYC Parks

Mike Whiting,Bomber
December 12, 2015 to June 10, 2016
Finn Square
GREENSTREET, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Michael Whiting creates playful sculptures drawing from the forms and imagery of early video gaming and computer graphics. Whiting attempts to communicate as much visual information as possible with his essential forms that combine the reductive simplicity of the minimalist movement and the sensibility of pop art in re-contextualizing cultural icons.

The exhibition is presented by Causey Contemporary.

Stuart Ringholt, Signpost (2007-2015), Photograph courtesy of OSMOS Adress

Stuart Ringholt,Signpost (2007-2015)
November 10, 2015 to June 1, 2016
First Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

In conjunction with his exhibition nudes, signs, and a contract at OSMOS Address, Stuart Ringholt, Ringholt installed an accompanying large-scale sculpture entitled Signpost (2007-2015) in nearby in First Park. Using the standard materials for a street sign, the artist facilitates an unexpected encounter with the range of emotions named on arrows pointing in different directions.

This exhibition is presented by Milani Gallery, Brisbane, OSMOS Address and First Street Green.

Beverly Pepper, My Circle, Photo by Devon Johnson, © Beverly Pepper, courtesy Marlborough Gallery, New York.

Beverly Pepper,My Circle
October 23, 2015 to May 31, 2016
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

In special recognition of Beverly Pepper’s 93rd birthday, the monumental sculpture My Circle, 2008 is on view in Union Square. The sculpture continues the artist’s contemplation of time, materiality and place, and is part of Curvae, her series of curved forms. By using Cor–Ten steel, a corrosion–resistant material that naturally and quickly develops a weathered–looking patina, Pepper is able to speed up the oxidation process, and in so doing suggest the concept of elapsed time through the sculpture’s skin of rust.

Like many of her monumental works, My Circle engages the viewer through the interplay of convex and concave forms. The use of opposing forces – vertical and horizontal, interior and exterior – creates a lyrical meditation of space that is at once dominant and intimate. The artist has stated that “Seeing, touching, and the physical sensory engagement is the way into my sculpture; my intention is that the meaning of my work rests in experiencing it, similar to the performing arts where listening and seeing the moments of a performance where meaning is revealed through experience.” She notes that My Circle, standing at fourteen feet tall in Cor–Ten steel, for her recalls an image from years ago relating to the symbolic character in Zen Buddhism where it is known as the Enso, a drawing in ink of an open or closed circle. The closed circle represents the totality of experience and life. The open circle represents the imperfection found in all things, and is known as the circle of enlightenment, its symbolism referring to the beginning and end of all things, the circle of life, and the connectedness of existence. What Pepper is drawn to within this narrative is the notion of the “connectedness of existence” and how we can connect people and populations through art.

This exhibition is presented by Marlborough Gallery and the Union Square Partnership.

Henry Kielmanowicz, The Space Between Us, photo courtesy of the artist

Henry Kielmanowicz,The Space Between Us
December 2015 to May 2016
First Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Henry Kielmanowicz creates sculptures from manmade objects that enter the waste cycle, specifically glass bottles. The bottles are transformed in a labor-intensive process by breaking, crushing and separating the glass into multiple sizes creating a new raw material. Not only is Kielmanowicz reusing waste from society, he also incorporates waste produced in his own studio.

The Space Between Us, a sculpture of a moon that has been created with repurposed bottles and resin, lights the park at night.

This exhibition is presented by First Street Green.

Various Artists,FLUX Public Art Projects: FLUX Art Fair
May 3, 2016 to May 31, 2016
Marcus Garvey Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

FLUX Public Art Projects, a FLUX Art Fair initiative, features over 40 public art installations for its second annual show. The fair will take place in several locations throughout Harlem’s parks and boulevards, concentrated in and around Marcus Garvey Park. The only contemporary art fair mounted in the neighborhood, FLUX embodies Harlem’s creative spirit and cultural significance by bringing together original works, from large sculptural works and sound pieces to performance art and thought-provoking installations in rocks, fences, and light-poles, by over 40 innovative artists.

This exhibition is presented by Art in FLUX, FLUX Art Fair, and Marcus Garvey Park Alliance.

Jorge Luis Rodriguez, Palenque, photo by NYC Parks

Jorge Luis Rodriguez,Birdhouse, Fish Spine, Hummingbird and Palenque
June 20, 2015 to May 30, 2016
Harlem Art Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Birdhouse, Fish Spine, Hummingbird and Palenque are Rodriguez’s early works that are on view for the first time. He created these works shortly after Growth with scrap metal from the metal shop where his permanent work was fabricated. They equally represent Rodríguez’s interest in nature and the cultural exchange derived from travel to different countries. They are fabricated in painted welded steel, one of his favored techniques, and stand between seven and nine feet tall.

Birdhouse was inspired by Pablo Neruda’s poem “Las aves maltratadas,” (“The Brutalized Birds”) references the conduct of birds that assemble en masse in public places. Fish Spine references Rodríguez’s recollection of fishing adventures in the Caribbean Sea with his brother. The symbiotic relationship between fauna and flora is captured in Hummingbird. Palenque is inspired by Mayan architectural devices used to record the passing of celestial events.

In addition to the installation at East Harlem Art Park, Rodriguez’s sculpture The Oracle of the Past, Present and Future is on view at Tompkins Square. The Oracle of the Past, Present and Future in the East Village and Birdhouse, Fish Spine, Hummingbird and Palenque in Harlem celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Growth, Rodríguez’s large-scale, permanent work that was New York City’s first completed Percent for Art commission.

Ken Shih, Can love pervade space?, Photo by NYC Parks

Art Students League,Model to Monument (M2M)
June 11, 2015 to May 15, 2016
Riverside Park South, Manhattan

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation that has culminated in the installation of seven sculptures on view along Riverside Park South from 59th to 69th Streets.

The sculptures were created by an international team of selected League students during a nine-month program. The pieces for this exhibition explore Patterns in Nature. The artists are: The sculptors participating in the fifth year of the M2M program are Lee Apt (Jubilation!), Caroline Bergonzi (Metamorphosis), Kate Jansyn (Fragment of an Angel), Sukyung Kim (Flow 1 – Cascade), Donat King (Man and Fish), Paola Morales (Thrive), and Ken Shih (Can love pervade space?). The collaborative sculpture in Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx for 2015 is entitled Gift of Life.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program and the Riverside Park Conservancy.

Queens

Jade Chan, In Flight, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Jade Chan,In Flight
July 2013 to present
Shorefront Parkway between Beach 77 Street and Beach 107 Street, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project is the longest mural in New York City, covering a 1.5 mile stretch of road along the beach in Rockaway, Queens. NYC Parks invited artists and designers to envision the surface of these ordinary barriers as canvases for art. Members of the community helped to select the top three designs that grace the surface of these barriers and paint the murals.

This project was made possible thanks to a partnership between NYC Parks and the NYC Department of Transportation, the Community Affairs Unit (CAU) of the Office of the Mayor, NYC Service, and community groups, including the Rockaway Beach Civic Association, Rockaway Artists Alliance, and Friends of Rockaway Beach. Benjamin Moore generously donated 420 gallons of paint to the Mayorâ??s Fund to Advance New York City for this initiative.

Jade Chan's design for the Rockaway barriers is titled In Flight. When she visited Rockaway Beach, she was inspired by the warmth, the sun and the colors that jumped out at her from the sky, water and sand. The sound of the surf and the breeze upon her skin was exhilarating. She observed the birds in flight and was inspired by this free and liberating vision. Chan sees In Flight as a representation of the freedom and strength of the human spirit.

Learn more about the Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project.

Patty Harris, Ride the Wave, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Patty Harris,Ride the Wave
July 2013 to present
Shorefront Parkway, Between Beach 74 Street and Beach 107 Street, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project is the longest mural in New York City, covering a 1.5 mile stretch of road along the beach in Rockaway, Queens. NYC Parks invited artists and designers to envision the surface of these ordinary barriers as canvases for art. Members of the community helped to select the top three designs that grace the surface of these barriers and paint the murals.

This project was made possible thanks to a partnership between NYC Parks and the NYC Department of Transportation, the Community Affairs Unit (CAU) of the Office of the Mayor, NYC Service, and community groups, including the Rockaway Beach Civic Association, Rockaway Artists Alliance, and Friends of Rockaway Beach. Benjamin Moore generously donated 420 gallons of paint to the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City for this initiative.

As an artist, Patty Harris has created animations of floods and is fascinated by the way water moves. Experienced in looking closely at the sea, she pulled a few simple forms that suggest the movement and pattern of a wave. For the Shore Parkway barrier, Patty painted shapes that express the undulating movement of a wave. She added curved shapes that hold water of a slightly different color—just as actual water displays a range of hues. To this rhythmical simple pattern, Harris included the silhouetted forms of surfers at the crests of the waves.

Learn more about the Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project.

John Garcia, Untitled, Courtesy of NYC Parks

John Garcia,Untitled
July 2013 to present
Shorefront Parkway, Between Beach 74 Street and Beach 107 Street, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project is the longest mural in New York City, covering a 1.5 mile stretch of road along the beach in Rockaway, Queens. NYC Parks invited artists and designers to envision the surface of these ordinary barriers as canvases for art. Members of the community helped to select the top three designs that grace the surface of these barriers and paint the murals.

This project was made possible thanks to a partnership between NYC Parks and the NYC Department of Transportation, the Community Affairs Unit (CAU) of the Office of the Mayor, NYC Service, and community groups, including the Rockaway Beach Civic Association, Rockaway Artists Alliance, and Friends of Rockaway Beach. Benjamin Moore generously donated 420 gallons of paint to the Mayorâ??s Fund to Advance New York City for this initiative.

As a surf regular of Rockaway Beach, John Garcia pays tribute to Rockaway Beachâ??s surf culture in his barrier mural. He has painted images of Rockaway surfers riding waves, along with the birds that often keep them company on the water and on the shore. These images of birds and surfers sit on top of an aquatic abstract backdrop that captures the mystery and beauty of the ocean. The barriers also include the text â??Welcome to the Rockawaysâ? as an invitation for others to experience the waves and serenity of Rockaway Beach.

Learn more about the Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project.

Wendy Klemperer,Shadow Migration
November 7, 2015 to November 7, 2016
Court Square Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Shadow Migration exhibits animal silhouettes cut from steel plates and installed throughout the park. Klemperer investigates animal populations that were threatened in the 20th century, but are now rebounding and showing up in “our backyard.” Wild animals are finding their way into suburban and urban environments as human populations sprawl into their natural habitats. While many species have been devastated, some are adapting and thriving on the largesse of urban life. Hawks dive from high rise cornices to feast on the rich urban population of pigeons and rats; bears walk through New Jersey neighborhoods; and just several blocks from Court Square Park, a coyote found its way to a rooftop in Long Island City.

Klemperer’s animal silhouettes are steel forms, punctuated with cutouts in the shape of countries from around the world. Each animal is a melting pot, bearing countries on its body that are also represented in Queens’ population—the most diverse community in the world.

This exhibition was made possible by the Clare Weiss Emerging Artist Award.

Staten Island

DB Lampman, The Dance, photo courtesy of NYC Parks

DB Lampman,The Dance
November 9, 2015 to November 9, 2016
Conference House Park, Staten Island
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Dance consists of five figures floating 15 feet above the ground. The figures, formed with steel and wrapped in nylon, hold hands and dance whimsically within a rectangular steel structure.  At night the figures light up and cast a glow around the neighboring trees. The Dance is inspired by Henri Matisse’s painting by the same name. Similar interlocked figures can be found throughout art history, including Mayan art, African tribal sculptures, and ancient Mesopotamia, among others, to symbolize family, community, and spiritual or universal connectivity. Lampman uses this symbol for the coming together of the Staten Island community.

Lampman lives and works in Staten Island and has embraced the diverse community made up of residents from around the world. In the exhibition, the five figures are entwined in a dance—they could be Flamenco dancers from Mexico, Kandyan dancers from Sri Lanka, or  a dance from West Africa such as the Yankadi, or the Makru.

Many Staten Island neighborhoods were flooded during Hurricane Sandy, and sadly lives and homes were lost in the storm.  However, Staten Island came together during this crisis—strangers dropped everything and join people from around the island and all over the world to rebuild the community.  The neighborhoods’ joint effort is an integral part of the inspiration for Lampman’s public artwork.  Additionally, Lampman hopes that the installation will inspire additional community development, as the informal pavilion can be used for public dance and music performances by community members.

Was this information helpful?