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Art in the Parks

Through collaborations with a diverse group of arts organizations and artists, Parks brings to the public both experimental and traditional art in many park locations. Please browse our list of current exhibits below, explore our archives of past exhibits or read more about the Art in the Parks Program.

Current Exhibits

Citywide

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Danh Vo, We The People
May 16, 2014 to December 5, 2014
City Hall Park, Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridge Park, Brooklyn

Description:

We the People is a life size copper replica of the statue in over 250 individual parts fabricated over the course of three years using the original techniques and materials. As a conceptual artist, Vo does not stipulate how many of the components should be shown together and refers to each presentation as a “detail” of the entire project. However, Public Art Fund’s exhibition featuring more than 50 pieces in Lower Manhattan’s City Hall Park and Brooklyn Bridge Park represents the largest public presentation of We the People to date. While components have been shown in exhibitions across the globe, this presentation of the work at two of New York City’s quintessential outdoor spaces invites audiences to consider the symbolic resonance of the Statue of Liberty in the city that is its home.

This is a project by the Public Art Fund.

LEAP opening reception in Union Square, Courtesy of NYC Parks

LEAP, A View from the Lunch Table: Students Bringing Issues to the Table
June 2, 2014 to August 25, 2014

Description:

Students from ten New York City public middle schools, with two schools representing each borough, have transformed school lunchroom tables into personalized canvases and created colorful works of public art that touch upon critical social issues in their community and across the globe. The tables, which have been installed in ten community parks across the five boroughs, are a way of giving young teens the chance to voice their opinions and reach out to the public in hopes of inspiring social change through their art. This exhibition was created by LeAp’s Public Art Program in cooperation with NYC Parks and marks the largest student exhibition in the history of NYC Parks and the first to span five boroughs. The program has included visits with distinguished artists such as Jenny Holzer, Crash, Emma Amos, Christo, and Lorna Simpson among many others. For 34 years, LeAp (Learning through an Expanded Art Program) has provided arts–based education to over two million students K-12 throughout New York City.

Artworks can be found through August at: Sara D. Roosevelt Park and Cherry Tree Park Playground in Manhattan; JJ Byrne Playground and Detective Joseph Mayrose Park in Brooklyn; St. Mary’s Park and Claremont Park in the Bronx; Juniper Valley Park and Evergreen Park in Queens; and Clove Lake Park and Snug Harbor Cultural Center in Staten Island.

For more information visit the LEAP website.

Bronx

Courtesy of the Art Students League

Art Students League, Tree of Life
June 12, 2014 to June 1, 2015
Van Cortlandt Park, Bronx
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with NYC Parks that has culminated in the installation of the monumental sculpture, Tree of Life, at Van Cortlandt Park.

The sculpture was created by an international team of seven selected League students during a nine-month program. In its fourth year, ASL created worked closely with the naturalists from Van Cortlandt Park to identify specific invertibre that are native to the area. The information they discovered was used by the artists to recreate artistic interpretations of the specimens. These interpretations are attached to a 12 foot tree-like structure. Tree of Life will be an educational experience for park visitors. The artists are: Laura Barmack, Janet Fekete-Bolton, Ana Sofìa Martì, Lindsay McCosh, Phyllis Sanfiorenzo, Natsuki Takauji, and Minako Yoshino.

A collaborative installation created by the team is also on concurrently on view in Riverside South Park in Manhattan. This exhibition is presented with the Art Students League.

Brooklyn

Nick Hornby, Bird God Drone, Courtesy of the artist

Nick Hornby, Bird God Drone
November 1, 2013 to October 31, 2014
Clumber Corner, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

In Hornby’s Bird God Drone, the outline of Michelangelo’s David – one of the most famous and widely reproduced sculptures in the world – has been extruded vertically over 12 feet to converge at a single point. In Bird God Drone, the silhouette of David’s conquering and classical Renaissance body lies horizontally, flush with the ground, and visible from above: by workers peering out of windows, tourists crossing the Brooklyn Bridge, birds, gods, and drones.

The sculpture is robotically carved from a synthetic composite to the accuracy of a fraction of a millimeter. The figurative perfection of Michelangelo’s sculpture is juxtaposed against the Platonic ideal of geometry.

Hornby has derived his outline, not from the original marble carving, but from a white plaster copy from the late 1800s located in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Here, in Brooklyn, Hornby’s sculpture is repositioned in another historical moment of belief in technological progress. It is no longer God and nature alone that view from above, but also drones and satellites, the components of our industrialization of space.

Accompanying this sculpture is a video of the work shot from above by a surveillance drone. The sculpture is designed specifically for this bird’s-eye view, inverting the ‘man on a plinth’ monument which is traditionally viewed from below. The video will be available on YouTube, accessible via smart-phones, and disseminated by social media, revealing Michelangelo’s outline dropped like a Google pin point (the hallmark of contemporary travel) in the urban landscape. www.birdgoddrone.com

This exhibition is presented by Two Trees Management Co.

Gilberto Aceves Navarro, Las Bicicletas
July 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014
Bartel-Pritchard Square, Brooklyn
Cadman Plaza Park, Brooklyn
Fruit Street Sitting Area, Brooklyn
Trinity Park, Brooklyn
Valentino Pier, Brooklyn

Description:

This summer, Las Bicicletas celebrates both art and bicycle riding in one of the most important cultural hubs of the world. Aceves Navarro said his inspiration for the bicycles came from a growing need for alternative transportation, especially in urban spaces. He also refers to the structures as “vehicles of happiness and health.”

One hundred twenty-two “bicicletas&rquo; sculptures will be installed in ten public spaces throughout Brooklyn and lower Manhattan from July through September. The public will be encouraged to visit the exhibit on bicycle, following a route of approximately ten miles of bicycle lanes and paths.

For a full list of sites please visit Las Bicicletas.

This project is in partnership with the New York City Department of Transportation.

Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, Geolocations: DUMBO, Photo courtesy of the artists

Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman, Geolocation: DUMBO
September 18, 2013 to September 17, 2014
Washington Street and Prospect Street, Brooklyn
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Geolocation: DUMBO is a new Twitter-inspired public art piece from photographers and self-described “virtual flâneurs” Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman. Wrapping 190ft around the corner of Washington and Prospect, this work was commissioned by the DUMBO Improvement District in collaboration with United Photo Industries.

Geolocation: DUMBO embraces the neighborhood’s digital culture. To create the piece, Larson and Shindelman used publicly available embedded GPS information in Twitter updates to track the locations of user posts and take photographs to mark the location in the real world. Each of the photographs is taken at the site of the update and paired with the originating text. According to the artists, the “act of making a photograph anchors and memorializes the ephemeral online data in the real world and also probes the expectations of privacy surrounding social networks.” Local sites depicted in the piece include Brooklyn Bridge Park, Etsy and the parking garage at 20 Jay.

The piece was commissioned by the DUMBO Improvement District and United Photo Industries in partnership with NYC Parks. For additional information about the project, click here.

Manhattan

Phyllis Sanfiorenzo, Atabey's Land Haven, photo courtesy of NYC Parks

Art Students League, Model to Monument (M2M)
June 12, 2014 to May 15, 2015
Riverside Park South, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Art Students League of New York, one of America’s premier art schools, presents the Model to Monument Program (M2M), a collaboration with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation that has culminated in the installation of seven sculptures on view along Riverside Park South from 59th to 69th Streets.

The sculptures were created by an international team of selected League students during a nine-month program. The pieces for this exhibition explore “The Architecture of Nature.”  The artists are: Laura Barmack, Janet Fekete-Bolton, Ana Sofìa Martì, Lindsay McCosh, Phyllis Sanfiorenzo, Natsuki Takauji, and Minako Yoshino.

This work was made possible by the Art Students League’s Model to Monument Program and the Riverside Park Fund.

Isabelle Cornaro, God Box (column), courtesy of Friends of the High Line

Various Artists, Archeo
April 17, 2014 to March, 2015
The High Line, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

An outdoor group exhibition about technology and obsolescence, Archeo brings together the work of artists who employ outmoded technologies and outdated machinery as a reflection on humanity’s continuous fascination and frustration with technology.

Today, many young artists engage with technology by exposing both its fragilities and merits. Their artworks embody an attitude that is simultaneously critical and nostalgic, in which the optimistic idealism of technological progress is countered by a disenchanted skepticism. Some of the works in the exhibition describe a recent past which resembles a dystopian future, featuring a wasteland of discarded machines and castaway objects. Other artists are more enthusiastic about the potential of technology but warn us against its dangerous side effects and its planned obsolescence. Some of the artworks on view disclose a return to the handmade and an attraction to organic forms and materials. These sculptures resemble relics and findings of an archaeology of the future.

Archeo features international artists including: Antoine Catala, Isabelle Cornaro, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Yngve Holen, Gavin Kenyon, Josh Kline, Marianne Vitale

This exhibition is presented by the Friends of the High Line.

Chuck Ginnever, Medusa, 1986

Charles Ginnever, Medusa and High Rise
December 6, 2013 to November 30, 2014
Riverside Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Charles Ginnever’s piece Medusa (1986) is located at 145th Street in Riverside Park and echoes his sculpture High Rise, sited on a neighboring lawn.   This exhibition marks Ginnever’s return to Parks, having exhibited in Carl Schurz Park in 1967 as part of Sculpture in Environment, one of the city’s first public art exhibitions. Charles Ginnever was born in San Mateo, CA in 1931. He is best known for his large-scale, open form works for the outdoors. He created the first of these in 1958 with abandoned railroad ties and structural steel. The result was a deconstruction of prevailing sculptural spatial concepts that he continues to examine. A contemporary of Mark di Suvero and Richard Serra, who also exhibit monumental steel pieces,  Ginnever’s sculptures have a trick of the eye and appear to warp as someone looks at the pieces from different angles.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Dean Monogenis, City Pillars, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 2014 to November 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

Monogenis’s City Pillars is comprised of seven striped rectilinear forms in varying dimensions, hovering just above the ground along the southern shoreline of Randall’s Island Park. Five vertical structures represent the boroughs of New York City and two horizontal forms will represent the East and Hudson Rivers. The work begins with the concept of the genius loci: originating in classical Rome, the term describes the protective spirit or divine guardian of a place. In Southeast Asia, similar shrines or “city pillars” are vertical, totemic monuments, dedicated to the specific deity of a location. FLOW.14 also includes Robert Raphael’s Untitled Folly, Jessica Sander’s Ground, andKant Smith’s Ghost House.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Kant Smith, Ghost House, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 2014 to November 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

Smith’s Ghost House sits on a bluff overlooking the Wards Meadow Fields at Randall’s Island Park. Constructed entirely of chain link fence, the sculpture will translate the vernacular of the baseball backstop into an ethereal and slightly surreal contemplation of the American home. FLOW.14 also includes Dean Monogenis’ City Pillars, Robert Raphael’s Untitled Folly, andJessica Sanders’ Ground.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Jessica Sanders, Ground, Flow.14 Art and Music at Randall’s Island
June 2014 to November 2014
Randall's Island Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

To install Ground, Sanders created ten sculpted earth chairs, in a variety of forms, within sight of one another along the coastline of Randall’s Island Park. The chairs are bound by Kentucky Bluegrass, chosen for its suitability to the Island’s ground and climate, as well as for its balance of softness and durability. The installation offers an unmitigated phenomenological experience, the opportunity to interact with a living material in a simultaneously nostalgic and atypical way. FLOW.14 also includes Dean Monogenis’ City Pillars, Robert Raphael’s Untitled Folly, andKant Smith’s Ghost House.

This exhibition is presented by Randall’s Island Parks Alliance, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, and Made Event.

Gimhongsok, Bearlike Construction, Photo Courtesy of NYC Parks

Gimhongsok, Bearlike Construction
May 5, 2014 to November 21, 2014
Tribeca Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Humorous and ironic, Gimhongsok’s work challenges the viewer to consider the contradictions and blurred boundaries of fact and fiction, originality and the copy, banality and the spectacular. He often uses everyday materials to engage his audience in a dialogue about preconceived and conventional values found in communities and in art. In Bearlike Construction, the form is immediately recognizable as a teddy bear, but is assembled out of cast bronze garbage bags rather than the conventional soft fur. The piece, which measures over five feet square also wittily echoes the ubiquitous piles of garbage bags found on street corners throughout New York City.

Courtesy of the artist

Rudy Shepherd, Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber
May 22, 2014 to November 15, 2014
First Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Black Rock Negative Energy Absorber is from a series of sculptures Rudy Shepherd has been working on since 2006, the first having been installed in Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, NY. Shepherd describes the Black Rock Negative Energy Absorbers as a group of sculptures with magical functions: to expunge negative energy from viewers – in the form of prejudice, racism, or even quotidian disdain – and allow them to respond to life with the more open, compassionate, and positive aspects of their personalities. The series reinterprets practices culled from new age mythology and ancient religions to heal the negative energies in society.

The exhibition is brought to you by First Street Green.

Juanli Carrion, Outer Seed Shadow #01
June 4, 2014 to November 15, 2014
Duarte Square, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Outer Seed Shadow #01 was conceived by Spanish artist Juanli Carrión in 2012 when after years of living in New York he started to consider permanent residence in the United States. He wanted to revisit the long-established idea of the American “melting pot” and investigate the new realities of immigrant life in 2014, particularly in New York, the most symbolic of immigrant cities. Carrión conducted a series of on-camera interviews with immigrants living throughout Manhattan about their personal experiences of arriving to the city. At the end of the discussion, each interviewee selected a plant that exists both in their country of origin and in the United States, which represents both them and their community in the public garden.

The 1,000 square foot garden is in the shape of Manhattan and features dozens of plants selected by immigrants living in the borough. Placed according to the interviewees’ real-life locations on the island, the plants represent the diversity of the city. The garden will host a series of free public programs beginning June 7 that includes artist-led tours, lectures, hands-on garden workshops and “Open Garden” days. For the complete schedule of programming visit: www.outerseedshadow.org/public-program.

This project is in partnership with the Horticultural Society of New York

Jim Rennert, THINK BIG
June 3, 2014 to October 31, 2014
Union Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Jim Rennert’s THINK BIG stands at over 12-feet tall serving as an inspiration to everyone who works hard every day to achieve their dreams and goals. The monumental businessman gazes up at the sky and the Manhattan skyline, reminding us that if we “think big” we can attain anything and that the American Dream is still very much alive and possible. Businessman or not, everyone can still relate to the themes in their own personal ways. THINK BIG is the culmination of positive thinking, as the original concept started as a two-inch sculpture. Rennert is excited to bring the sculpture to New York so that everyone can indeed, “think big.”

The project is made possible by the Cavalier Gallery and Union Square Partnership.

Courtesy of NYC Parks

Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas, Arch III
May 2014 to September 2014
Dag Hammarskjold Plaza, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Strong-Cuevas, whose work has been acclaimed by critics around the world and whose powerful, dramatic sculptures are in numerous public and private collections internationally, is exhibiting a large bronze, ARCH III, at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza. The arch is a symbolic gateway to peace and cooperation represented by the United Nations, which is at the east end of 47 Street.

Joshua Ruff, the Long Island Museum’s Director of Collections and Interpretations, wrote: “The monumental scale of her sculptures holds their own. But regardless of size, Strong-Cuevas’ art has an enormous, captivating grip... [her] work is both thought-provoking and energetic, the result of many years of careful and inspired artistic evolution and wonderfully diverse influences...Her work really must be seen and enjoyed in person for a full appreciation.”

Rachel Feinstein, Folly
May 7, 2014 to September 7, 2014
Madison Square Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Marking Rachel Feinstein’s first public art exhibition in the U.S. and comprising her largest sculptural works to date, the installation consists of three follies–structures that were popular in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century architecture, built with decorative rather than functional purpose. Feinstein’s sculptures are executed in graphically printed and detailed panels of thin metal, ranging from eight to 26 feet tall. The three structures include a house perched on a towering cliff, a Rococo-style hut, and a flying ship moored high in a tree, supported by a mast extending to the ground.

Best known for her fanciful sculptures, Feinstein’s stage-set follies for Mad. Sq. Art are made of powder-coated aluminum with applied surface illustration. They are not inhabitable as the works are sculptural reliefs: they have active, three-dimensional facades and flat backs with structural supports. Installed on three park lawns, the structures will evoke theatrical scenery in which the park visitors are the actors.

This exhibition is presented by Mad. Sq. Art.

Olaf Breuning, Clouds
March 4, 2014 to August 24, 2014
Doris C. Freedman Plaza
Central Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:
?Olaf Breuning’s largest public art installation in the United States to date, the work features six clouds rendered as childlike drawings made of polished blue aluminum towering nearly 35 feet above the plaza and mounted on seemingly makeshift steel supports. Blending reality with fiction and refined forms with a do-it-yourself aesthetic, this new work is a whimsical addition to the Midtown Manhattan skyline.

This exhibition is presented by the Public Art Fund

Courtesy of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council

Caraballo-Farman, The Signs of Paradise
June 20, 2014 to August 23, 2014
Battery Park, Manhattan
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Since 1886, the Statue of Liberty has invited immigrants from across the world to seek out their own piece of worldly paradise here in the United States. Today, each of the 50 states has its own town called “Paradise.” With this installation, celebrated artist Caraballo-Farman offers visitors to Battery Park directions and distances to each of the 50 Paradises within eye-shot of Lady Liberty.

The exhibition is brought to you by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Queens

Courtesy of the artist

Bundith Phunsombatlert, Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures
May 15, 2014 to November 15, 2014
Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Wayfinding: 100 NYC Public Sculptures is a site-specific project that invites the public to embark on guided journeys through NYC to find public sculptures. Phunsombatlert researched all existing public sculptures in New York City and identified 100 sites to be incorporated in his final work. He then created small drawings of each sculpture and developed directional signs and maps that resemble standard U.S. National Park Service signage. The artwork is made up of signage for 100 public sculptures that contain distances drawn from GPS coordinates between each sculpture and the group of wooden posts outside of the Queens Museum at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

The project is made possible by the generosity of the Athena Foundation, Awesome Foundation, Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Location One, New York Foundation for the Arts’ Opportunity Grants, Puffin Foundation, Ltd., Puffin Foundation West, Ltd., Socrates Sculpture Park, Mark di Suvero, Anne Dunning, Rob Herschenfeld, James T. MacGregor & Claire Montgomery, Ivana Mestrovic, and Jan Mun.

Courtesy of Socrates Sculpture Park

Pawel Althamer, Queen Mother of Reality
May 11, 2014 to August 3, 2014
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Queen Mother of Reality by Pawel Althamer is a monumental, mixed media sculpture of an elegant figure that is peacefully reclining in the shaded southern section of the park overlooking the East River waterfront. Althamer’s sculpture is dedicated to and inspired by “Queen Mother” Dr. Delois Blakely, a U.S. Ambassador of Goodwill to Africa,who has been the Community Mayor of Harlem since she was sworn in by Mayor Rudolph Giuliani in 1995. Queen Mother of Reality serves as a call to highlight the numerous displaced and homeless of New York City – Dr. Blakely’s paramount cause.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park in collaboration with Performa, and in partnership with the Polish Cultural Institute New York.

Courtesy of Socrates Sculpture Park

Zilvinas Kempinas, Scarecrow
May 11, 2014 to August 3, 2014
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Scarecrowis a new site-specific installation by artist Zilvinas Kempinas and the largest installation in Socrates’ 28-year history. Minimal and magical, the sculpture will be a 250-foot-long, thirteen-foot-high kinetic pathway composed of 200 stainless steel, mirrored poles connecting energetic slopes of silver Mylar ribbon overhead. With two simple elements – poles and tape – Scarecrow activates the invisible forces of nature. Scarecrow will reflect its surrounding environment and thus will continuously change throughout the exhibition. The perpetual motion of the ribbon, as it responds to the wind of its environment, will echo the natural flowing of the nearby East River, while the mirrored material will reflect momentary shifts of light and sky like a shimmering horizon along the waterfront.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Courtesy of Socrates Sculpture Park

Austin + Mergold, SuralArk
May 11, 2014 to August 3, 2014
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

SuralArk by Jason Timberlake Austin and Aleksandr Mergold, of the Philadelphia-based architectural firm Austin+Mergold, is the winning proposal for Folly 2014, an annual design / build competition co-organized by The Architectural League of New York and Socrates Sculpture Park. This residency and exhibition explores the intersections among architecture, design, and sculpture through an interpretation of the architectural folly. The project was selected from over 170 submissions by a jury of architects and artists, including Chris Doyle, artist; John Hatfield, Socrates Sculpture Park; Enrique Norten, TEN Arquitectos; Lisa Switkin, James Corner Field Operations; and Ada Tolla, LOT-EK.

The 2014 Folly program is made possible by a generous grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park.

Courtesy of Socrates Sculpture Park

Meshac Gaba, Broadway Billboard: Citoyen Du Monde
May 11, 2014 to August 3, 2014
Socrates Sculpture Park, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

Citoyen du Monde, the park’s spring Broadway Billboard by the Beninese artist Meschac Gaba, is the artist’s vision for a global flag. Created by elongating individual flags from every country in the world into narrow triangles that converge at a central point, this optically spectacular work presents a humorous image of idealism and optimism for resolutions to the difficulties and crises that divide our world. The singularity of each flag is lost in the rhythm of the composition as is the case in the age of globalization where national borders merge into the international. Greeting visitors at the entrance to the park, this large scale utopic graphic broadcasts a message of unity that reflects Socrates’ mission to introduce art to the broadest spectrum of people possible.

This exhibition is presented by Socrates Sculpture Park, Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg, and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York.

Jade Chan, In Flight, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Jade Chan, In Flight
July 2013 to July 2014
Shorefront Parkway between Beach 77 Street and Beach 107 Street, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project is the longest mural in New York City, covering a 1.5 mile stretch of road along the beach in Rockaway, Queens. NYC Parks invited artists and designers to envision the surface of these ordinary barriers as canvases for art. Members of the community helped to select the top three designs that grace the surface of these barriers and paint the murals.

This project was made possible thanks to a partnership between NYC Parks and the NYC Department of Transportation, the Community Affairs Unit (CAU) of the Office of the Mayor, NYC Service, and community groups, including the Rockaway Beach Civic Association, Rockaway Artists Alliance, and Friends of Rockaway Beach. Benjamin Moore generously donated 420 gallons of paint to the Mayorâ??s Fund to Advance New York City for this initiative.

Jade Chan's design for the Rockaway barriers is titled In Flight. When she visited Rockaway Beach, she was inspired by the warmth, the sun and the colors that jumped out at her from the sky, water and sand. The sound of the surf and the breeze upon her skin was exhilarating. She observed the birds in flight and was inspired by this free and liberating vision. Chan sees In Flight as a representation of the freedom and strength of the human spirit.

Learn more about the Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project.

Patty Harris, Ride the Wave, Courtesy of NYC Parks

Patty Harris, Ride the Wave
July 2013 to July 2014
Shorefront Parkway, Between Beach 74 Street and Beach 107 Street, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project is the longest mural in New York City, covering a 1.5 mile stretch of road along the beach in Rockaway, Queens. NYC Parks invited artists and designers to envision the surface of these ordinary barriers as canvases for art. Members of the community helped to select the top three designs that grace the surface of these barriers and paint the murals.

This project was made possible thanks to a partnership between NYC Parks and the NYC Department of Transportation, the Community Affairs Unit (CAU) of the Office of the Mayor, NYC Service, and community groups, including the Rockaway Beach Civic Association, Rockaway Artists Alliance, and Friends of Rockaway Beach. Benjamin Moore generously donated 420 gallons of paint to the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City for this initiative.

As an artist, Patty Harris has created animations of floods and is fascinated by the way water moves. Experienced in looking closely at the sea, she pulled a few simple forms that suggest the movement and pattern of a wave. For the Shore Parkway barrier, Patty painted shapes that express the undulating movement of a wave. She added curved shapes that hold water of a slightly different color—just as actual water displays a range of hues. To this rhythmical simple pattern, Harris included the silhouetted forms of surfers at the crests of the waves.

Learn more about the Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project.

John Garcia, Untitled, Courtesy of NYC Parks

John Garcia, Untitled
July 2013 to July 2014
Shorefront Parkway, Between Beach 74 Street and Beach 107 Street, Queens
Map/Directions (in Google Maps)

Description:

The Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project is the longest mural in New York City, covering a 1.5 mile stretch of road along the beach in Rockaway, Queens. NYC Parks invited artists and designers to envision the surface of these ordinary barriers as canvases for art. Members of the community helped to select the top three designs that grace the surface of these barriers and paint the murals.

This project was made possible thanks to a partnership between NYC Parks and the NYC Department of Transportation, the Community Affairs Unit (CAU) of the Office of the Mayor, NYC Service, and community groups, including the Rockaway Beach Civic Association, Rockaway Artists Alliance, and Friends of Rockaway Beach. Benjamin Moore generously donated 420 gallons of paint to the Mayorâ??s Fund to Advance New York City for this initiative.

As a surf regular of Rockaway Beach, John Garcia pays tribute to Rockaway Beachâ??s surf culture in his barrier mural. He has painted images of Rockaway surfers riding waves, along with the birds that often keep them company on the water and on the shore. These images of birds and surfers sit on top of an aquatic abstract backdrop that captures the mystery and beauty of the ocean. The barriers also include the text â??Welcome to the Rockawaysâ? as an invitation for others to experience the waves and serenity of Rockaway Beach.

Learn more about the Rockaway Barrier Beautification Project.

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